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Dustin Kelley

hyperlite | Listener Since 2009

1
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 3 reviews
  • 11 ratings
  • 78 titles in library
  • 5 purchased in 2014
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  • The End of Your Life Book Club

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 40 mins)
    • By Will Schwalbe
    • Narrated By Jeff Harding
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (422)
    Performance
    (372)
    Story
    (372)

    >"What are you reading?" That's the question Will Schwalbe asks his mother, Mary Anne, as they sit in the waiting room of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. In 2007, Mary Anne returned from a humanitarian trip to Pakistan and Afghanistan suffering from what her doctors believed was a rare type of hepatitis. Months later she was diagnosed with a form of advanced pancreatic cancer, which is almost always fatal, often in six months or less. This is the inspiring true story of a son and his mother.

    Mark says: "A good book, but not really for me."
    "Highly Recommend"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    This book is a must-read for people wanting to know more about Afghan culture. Rory Stewart is a Scottish historian and writer who culminates a walk across the Middle East with a roughly month-long walk across Afghanistan in the weeks immediately following the fall of the Taliban. He walks through deserts, mountains and valleys. He meets new government officials and soldiers, simple village folk, mullahs, Taliban-loving villagers, etc. He only survived because he spoke Persian, was respectful of Afghan culture, and was given a dog for protection in remote and dangerous areas. After reading this, I realize more than ever that Afghanistan is a bit of every stereotype. He encountered jihadists (quite few in comparison) and peaceful villagers who didn’t even know about the United States. It is a misunderstood country that needs to be met with fresh eyes.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • DOC: The Rise and Rise of Julius Erving

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 40 mins)
    • By Vincent Mallozzi
    • Narrated By David Crommett
    Overall
    (4)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (3)

    Julius Erving, aka Dr. J, was a wizard with the basketball, performing feats the world had never seen before: midair spins and whirls punctuated by powerful slam dunks, which he was the first to glamorize. In a career that lasted from the 1970s well into the 1980s, he was one of the first players to make extemporaneous individual expression an integral part of the game, setting the style of play that has prevailed ever since. He's also long been respected as a gracious, dignified, and disciplined man. As there are great men of history, there are great men of sports, and Dr. J is just such a man.

    Dustin Kelley says: "Just watch ESPN's documentary"
    "Just watch ESPN's documentary"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    As the book began, Mallozzi gave the impression that this was an authorized biography. Near the end of the book, as he switched to the skeletons in Erving's closet, it suddenly became apparent that was not the case. In fact, Erving was not pleased by this rendering of his story. Overall, the book was ok I suppose, but Mallozzi used flowery language and was very repetitive. After reading this, I watched the documentary and ESPN tells most of the story in 1 hour as opposed to this 8 hour menace. And the documentary actually shows his dunks. Erving's life is made for a documentary. Baseball is better for books...

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Places in Between

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 39 mins)
    • By Rory Stewart
    • Narrated By Rory Stewart
    Overall
    (388)
    Performance
    (101)
    Story
    (101)

    In January 2002, Rory Stewart walked across Afghanistan, surviving by his wits, his knowledge of Persian dialects and Muslim customs, and the kindness of strangers. By day, he passed through mountains covered in nine feet of snow, hamlets burned and emptied by the Taliban, and communities thriving amid the remains of medieval civilizations. By night he slept on villagers' floors, shared their meals, and listened to their stories of the recent and ancient past.

    James says: "Nice Choice"
    "Highly Informative"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    This book is a must-read for people wanting to know more about Afghan culture. Rory Stewart is a Scottish historian and writer who culminates a walk across the Middle East with a roughly month-long walk across Afghanistan in the weeks immediately following the fall of the Taliban. He walks through deserts, mountains and valleys. He meets new government officials and soldiers, simple village folk, mullahs, Taliban-loving villagers, etc. He only survived because he spoke Persian, was respectful of Afghan culture, and was given a dog for protection in remote and dangerous areas. After reading this, I realize more than ever that Afghanistan is a bit of every stereotype. He encountered jihadists (quite few in comparison) and peaceful villagers who didn’t even know about the United States. It is a misunderstood country that needs to be met with fresh eyes.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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