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David

Ocala, FL, USA | Member Since 2001

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  • Objectivism: The Philosophy of Ayn Rand

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 5 mins)
    • By Leonard Peikoff
    • Narrated By Johanna Ward
    Overall
    (232)
    Performance
    (92)
    Story
    (96)

    This brilliantly conceived book is based on a lecture course given by Dr. Leonard Peikoff in 1976 entitled, "The Philosophy of Objectivism". The lectures were attended by Ayn Rand, who helped prepare them and who also joined Peikoff in answering questions.

    L. Hattery says: "The very best overview of Objectivism"
    "Electric reasoning"
    Overall

    I read the book three years ago. Now, listening to it has made an even stronger impression on me. Contrary to another review, I found it easier to follow the arguments by listening, even "on the go." Peikoff's arguments are tight and insightful. What is most impressive is how far the book goes in integration of the branches of philosophy and the truths within them. If you have ever read much 20th century philosophy, you may be familiar with the arbitrariness, the groundlessness, of virtually every piece of work done in the field. And you'll also find Peikoff's philosophy here alien from what you've experienced. Yet it is this work that starts with reality and proceeds to solve the problems that the mess of 20th Century philosophy has found intractable.

    My only qualms are the narrator's frequent mispronunciations. Most irritating is her mispronuncation of "processes" as "prah-cess-eez." There's no "eez," however many people butcher the word; that pluralization is used for Latin-based words whose singular ends in "is," e.g., "basis," "thesis." The purpose is to eliminate a messy buzz at the end of plurals ("baseses"? Like that?), so the "is" becomes "es" and is pronounced "eez." And oddly, about 40% through the book, she suddenly begins pronouncing it correctly--but not consistently. Another is her mispronunciation of "Aristotelian."

    Other than those qualms, I like the narrator.

    17 of 21 people found this review helpful

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