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Julie W. Capell

The audio books I get tend to be either 1) scifi or 2) things for my husband and me to listen to on long road trips--humor or history

Milwaukee, WI USA | Member Since 2007

394
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 123 reviews
  • 152 ratings
  • 303 titles in library
  • 22 purchased in 2015
FOLLOWING
5
FOLLOWERS
21

  • When You Are Engulfed in Flames

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 3 mins)
    • By David Sedaris
    • Narrated By David Sedaris
    Overall
    (4485)
    Performance
    (1871)
    Story
    (1867)

    Once again, David Sedaris brings together a collection of essays so uproariously funny and profoundly moving that his legions of fans will fall for him all over again. He tests the limits of love when Hugh lances a boil from his backside, and pushes the boundaries of laziness when, finding the water shut off in his house in Normandy, he looks to the water in a vase of fresh cut flowers to fill the coffee machine.

    Kelley says: "Smokin'"
    "Another great entry in the Sedaris ouvre"
    Overall

    Hysterical in many parts . . . great of course to hear Sedaris reading it himself.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • The Alchemist and the Executioness

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 36 mins)
    • By Paolo Bacigalupi, Tobias S. Buckell
    • Narrated By Jonathan Davis, Katherine Kellgren
    Overall
    (755)
    Performance
    (376)
    Story
    (376)

    It is a world where magic is forbidden – yet practiced in secret every day. But each small act of magic exacts a dreadful price – for it brings the bramble, which chokes farmland, destroys villages, and kills with its deadly thorns. In this world an alchemist believes he’s found a solution to the curse. But will the cure be worse than the disease? And a woman is forced to take up the mantle of her father, the Executioner. But it will not be the only death that she faces.

    Rand says: "Not What I Expected..."
    "What if magic polluted the world?"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I absolutely loved the world these two authors co-created for these linked novellas. That there would be negative consequences to magic is a completely unique idea, in my experience of fantasy literature. Bacigalupi took the concept and ran with it. His story, The Alchemist, featured a fully realized main character and was beautifully written, only faltering slightly at the end, which seemed to not really fit the rest of the story. The Executioness suffered in comparison. It felt one-dimensional and skirted dealing head-on with the essential dilemma. At the end, I was left with an unfinished feeling, as if there should have been a third story that would have solved the problem once and for all.

    [I listened to this as an audio book read by Jonathan Davis and Katherine Kellgren. Both did excellent jobs narrating. It seemed they coordinated their performances, deciding that the denizens of this world would speak with vaguely African sounding accents. This helped me feel like I had been transported to another realm and made the world of the book more real.]

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Birthright: The Book of Man

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 57 mins)
    • By Mike Resnick
    • Narrated By Tom Weiner
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (11)
    Performance
    (9)
    Story
    (9)

    This brilliant science fiction novel constructs a blueprint of mankind’s history - social, political, economic, scientific, and religious - for the next 18,000 years. Through a series of adventures, it illustrates clear, focused ideas about our birthright and our destiny. Since this 1982 debut, Mike Resnick has emerged as one of the most honored science fiction authors of his time, picking up 40-odd Hugo and Nebula nominations and awards. He has set 25 novels and a novella in the future that was outlined in this book.

    Julie W. Capell says: "B-O-R-I-N-G"
    "B-O-R-I-N-G"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What disappointed you about Birthright?

    I love scifi but this book just didn't work for me. Too negative.


    What was most disappointing about Mike Resnick’s story?

    I only made it through the first story and part of the second one. No female characters, everything very negative, stories not connected except by the world being constructed by the author. Maybe if I had knowledge of other books set in this world I would have liked it more, but as a first "toe in the water" it just didn't hold my interest.


    What three words best describe Tom Weiner’s performance?

    Okay but not memorable.


    You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

    Ummmm . . . not really


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Humans: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 11 mins)
    • By Matt Haig
    • Narrated By Mark Meadows
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (153)
    Performance
    (135)
    Story
    (137)

    The critically acclaimed author of The Radleys shares a clever, heartwarming, and darkly insightful novel about an alien who comes to Earth to save humans from themselves. When an extraterrestrial visitor arrives on Earth, his first impressions of the human species are less than positive. But as time goes on, he starts to realize there may be more to this weird species than he has been led to believe. Eventually, the narrator sees hope and redemption in the humans' imperfections and begins to question the very mission that brought him there.

    cristina says: "Adorable alien story"
    "Easy, funny and insightful"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Funny and scifi seldom go together, but when they do and it works, it is a wonderful thing. “The Humans” managed to make me laugh out loud, many times. The observations about the human condition were often spot-on, going beyond the trite to really make me think in a few cases. Overall, an enjoyable read that I think is particularly accessible to people who wouldn’t normally read scifi.

    [I listened to this as an audio book read by Mark Meadows, who did a fantastic job. I think this is a case in which listening would be better than reading the book, because Mr. Meadows’ delivery added a lot to the droll nature of the humor.]

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Circle

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 42 mins)
    • By Dave Eggers
    • Narrated By Dion Graham
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1362)
    Performance
    (1219)
    Story
    (1229)

    When Mae Holland is hired to work for the Circle, the world's most powerful internet company, she feels she's been given the opportunity of a lifetime. The Circle, run out of a sprawling California campus, links users' personal emails, social media, banking, and purchasing with their universal operating system, resulting in one online identity and a new age of civility and transparency. As Mae tours the open-plan office spaces, the towering glass dining facilities, the cozy dorms for those who spend nights at work, she is thrilled with the company's modernity and activity.

    Suzn F says: "Big Brother Employer"
    "Not for hard-core scifi fans"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Maybe I have read too many dystopian sci-fi novels, but this book just did not capture my interest. However, after listening to my book club discuss it, I realize that for people who do not spend a lot of time thinking about the “dark side” of technology and social media, “The Circle” can be a real revelation. What I thought was trite and hackneyed, most of the people in my book club thought was brilliant, revelatory and scary. One person came up to me after the meeting and said “I never knew science fiction could be like this! I want to read more!” If that was your reaction to this book, I would recommend you pick up “The Traveler” by John Twelve Hawks. And if you already love science fiction and were disappointed by “the Circle,” go ahead and pick up “The Traveler,” because it will restore your faith in the ability of scifi to warn us about dangers ahead without hitting us over the head with a sledge hammer.

    [I listened to this as an audio book performed by Dion Graham. As has happened before when I listen to a book for my book club that most others read in hard copy, my experience of the book was significantly different. I don’t attribute that entirely to the performance, but I did question the decision to have a man read a book in which the main character is a young woman in her early 20’s, as are many of the other characters. On top of that, the narrator made all these millennials, including the male characters, sound like valley girls—everything they said came out like questions. It was all pretty annoying and diminished my enjoyment of the novel.]

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Burgess Boys: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 29 mins)
    • By Elizabeth Strout
    • Narrated By Cassandra Campbell
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (651)
    Performance
    (554)
    Story
    (559)

    Haunted by the freak accident that killed their father when they were children, Jim and Bob Burgess escaped from their Maine hometown of Shirley Falls for New York City as soon as they possibly could. Jim, a sleek, successful corporate lawyer, has belittled his bighearted brother their whole lives, and Bob, a Legal Aid attorney who idolizes Jim, has always taken it in stride. But their long-standing dynamic is upended when their sister, Susan - the Burgess sibling who stayed behind - urgently calls them home.

    Molly-o says: "Loved, loved, loved it!"
    "Was I supposed to care about these characters?"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I decided after the first hour that I just didn’t care about the characters in this novel. The first warning sign was when I had to listen to the prologue three times. The first two times, when I got to the end of the chapter, I realized my attention had wandered so much that I didn’t know what was going on. I didn’t know who was who, who was telling the story about who, what the time frames of the different stories were. I don’t think my confusion was due to anything particularly complex about the story. It’s just that all the people were so bland I couldn’t tell them apart. The characters have the names “Jim” and “Bob” and “Sue” and “Margaret” and “Helen.” Someone has had multiple marriages. Someone has a son that suffered a mysterious tragedy. Or maybe it’s the whole family that has suffered a mysterious tragedy. At the end of the prologue, you are supposed to care enough about these individuals to want to listen to another 13 hours. It reminded me a little bit of the setup in the fabulous “The Dinner” by Herman Koch but without the hilarious snarkiness and unshakeable sense of impending disaster. I don’t know if it was the performance or the book or both, but I simply couldn’t muster up enough interest in the Burgess family to want to know what happened to them.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 25 mins)
    • By David Sedaris
    • Narrated By David Sedaris
    Overall
    (4107)
    Performance
    (3730)
    Story
    (3710)

    From the unique perspective of David Sedaris comes a new collection of essays taking his listeners on a bizarre and stimulating world tour. From the perils of French dentistry to the eating habits of the Australian kookaburra, from the squat-style toilets of Beijing to the particular wilderness of a North Carolina Costco, we learn about the absurdity and delight of a curious traveler's experiences.

    FanB14 says: "Devout Fan Disappointed"
    "Good until the last couple of stories"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Another very enjoyable “listen” from Sedaris. I love listening to his essays on long car rides; this book was everything I have come to expect from him, generating lots of chuckles and several laugh-out-loud moments. The only part I was disappointed in was the last couple of stories. He introduces them by saying he can’t understand why kids in forensics use his stories, because he doesn’t think they’re “performable.” Huh? This from a guy who makes a tidy living performing his essays out loud? As if that weren’t confusing enough, he then says he wrote the rest of the essays just for the kids in forensics, and goes on to read some of the absolute worst, most un-funny stories I have ever heard from him. I knocked this down to three stars because of these weird and inappropriate stories at the end.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Heart of Darkness: A Signature Performance by Kenneth Branagh

    • UNABRIDGED (3 hrs and 51 mins)
    • By Joseph Conrad
    • Narrated By Kenneth Branagh
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1875)
    Performance
    (1588)
    Story
    (1594)

    A Signature Performance: Kenneth Branagh plays this like a campfire ghost story, told by a haunted, slightly insane Marlow.

    Harold says: "From Civilization into Darkness"
    "Undeserving time-honored classic"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I found this novella mostly incomprehensible. Oh, there is clearly a critique of imperialism, as many reviewers point out. But it seems to me, the critique is not that the colonizers (in this case, Belgians) are raping Africa of its natural resources (ivory) and enslaving its people. Rather, the book seems to be lamenting that good, white Europeans become tainted upon encountering Africa. The Africans are all depicted as sub-human, and the continent as a malevolent entity. I understand that attitudes were far different when Conrad wrote this in 1898 than they are today. Reading novels from other time periods allows one to better understand how thinking has changed . . . or not changed. However, I fail to understand the attention this novella has attracted . . . most of what happens just makes no sense at all. Reviews from readers who appear to be deeper thinkers than myself indicate that Kurtz is somehow the embodiment of Evil, but whatever it is he did is never explained. Characters go on and on about how eloquent he is, how smart he is, how he has a Grand Plan . . . but we are never shown any evidence that these things are the case. The viewpoint character, Marlow, alternates between admiration of the evil Kurtz, and abhorrence of . . . whatever horrible unnamed thing Kurtz has done. The most overrated 200 pages I have ever read. The only thing that made me finish it was the fact that I was listening to it as an audiobook performed by Kenneth Branagh, and I just didn’t want to turn off his fabulous voice.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Moonrise

    • UNABRIDGED (18 hrs and 20 mins)
    • By Ben Bova
    • Narrated By Stefan Rudnicki
    Overall
    (229)
    Performance
    (168)
    Story
    (168)

    A 21st century U.S. aerospace company has developed the first permanent human settlement on the Moon, made possible by major scientific breakthroughs, particularly in the practical use of nanotechnology. But conflict within the company's founding family and growing protests against the technology from radical environmentalists and religious fundamentalists on Earth put Moonbase in danger of closure

    Brian says: "A worthy read / listen"
    "For moon enthusiasts only"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    For those of us who were just the right age when the first astronauts stepped onto the moon, who have never stopped being spellbound by the thought of setting foot on other worlds, who still believe humanity will make it to the stars . . . this book is for us.

    Bova is at his best when describing the scientific and technological aspects of a lunar colony, such as nanotechnology and the very real dangers of living on an atmosphereless rock. But he can also wax poetic when describing the lunar landscape, the hard-edged horizon, the Earth hanging overhead, the scoured rock below.

    The characters and plot lines were a bit thin, and if you want a really compelling take on lunar survival, I would recommend “The Martian” by Andy Weir, but hard-core sci-fi readers will want to add Moonrise to their reading list.

    [I listened to this as an audio book read by Stefan Rudnicki. I love Rudnicki’s voice, but I am glad I followed the advice of other listeners—I listened at 1.5 speed and that felt perfect.]

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 55 mins)
    • By Malala Yousafzai
    • Narrated By Archie Panjabi
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1276)
    Performance
    (1122)
    Story
    (1128)

    When the Taliban took control of the Swat Valley in Pakistan, one girl spoke out. Malala Yousafzai refused to be silenced and fought for her right to an education. On Tuesday, October 9, 2012, when she was fifteen, she almost paid the ultimate price. She was shot in the head at point-blank range while riding the bus home from school, and few expected her to survive. Instead, Malala's miraculous recovery has taken her on an extraordinary journey from a remote valley in northern Pakistan to the halls of the United Nations in New York.

    Jan says: "So much more than expected..."
    "Nonviolent resistance through a girl's eyes"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is the first book I have ever read about Pakistan, and so it was fascinating to get some insight into the history of this country that has loomed so large in the news ever since 9/11. There are brief touches of the colonial era, such as when Malala tells the story of her namesake, Malalai, a young Afghan girl who died in the war her country fought against the British in the late 1800s.

    But mainly, the book focuses on the recent history of Pakistan. Anyone deeply interested in Pakistani history will want to find a more academic source, but for the average American reader who doesn’t know much about this part of the world (like me) there is just enough detail here to contextualize Malala’s personal experience.

    Of course, the most interesting parts of the book are when Malala describes her own feelings about what it was like to live under the Taliban. Because she was extremely young--in her early teens—during the events she describes, her life revolved around school and family. Therefore it is through these lenses that the reader experiences her struggle, the struggle to keep schooling open and available for girls.

    I guess that is the thing I liked most about the book, that it is revolution and resistance told through a young woman’s story. Whether she knew it at the time or not, Malala was using nonviolent methods to defy the Taliban, who were (and are) some of the most violent sects of Islam. They tried to shut her down by killing her, but she survived. I am glad I read Malala’s story. Hopefully, she will continue to work for equal education and other basic human rights for women and girls for decades to come.

    [I listened to this as an audio book narrated by Archie Panjabi. There is a short introduction in Malala’s own voice, which is nice to hear, but she does have a pretty strong accent. The narrator is recognizably Pakistani but completely clear and understandable. The reading was a bit slow for my taste; by speeding my player up to 1.25 speed, it felt just right.]

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • A House in the Sky: A Memoir

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 17 mins)
    • By Amanda Lindhout, Sara Corbett
    • Narrated By Amanda Lindhout
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (420)
    Performance
    (373)
    Story
    (373)

    Amanda Lindhout reads her spectacularly dramatic memoir of a woman whose curiosity about the world led her from rural Canada to imperiled and dangerous countries on every continent, and then into 15 months of harrowing captivity in Somalia - a story of courage, resilience, and extraordinary grace. In August 2008, she traveled to Mogadishu, Somalia - "the most dangerous place on Earth." On her fourth day in the country, she and her photojournalist companion were abducted.

    Eric Schurr says: "Incredible story! Very well written and delivered"
    "Brave and riveting"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Merely by writing the story of the 460 days she spent in captivity in Somalia, Amanda Lindhout exhibits the strength that allowed her to live through the ordeal. As I read, I quickly lost track of the number of times I caught myself thinking how hard it must have been for her to dwell on those memories in order to get them on paper. She does not make herself out to be a hero, rather the opposite. Beginning with her life pre-kidnapping, she reveals herself as a somewhat vapid twenty-something who did not believe anything bad could ever happen to her. She does not paint a pretty picture of herself, yet beneath the cluelessness, her yearning to expand her horizons and improve her lot in life helped me sympathize with her and understand why she traveled to such a dangerous place as Somalia. It’s really a case of “there but for the grace of God . . .” Readers who want to blame Lindhout for going to Somalia are either people who have never taken a risk in their lives, or haven’t got the good sense to realize that everyone is vulnerable.

    Once she is in the hands of her kidnappers, the story is riveting. Here again, Lindhout does not paint a picture of herself as valiant, just an ordinary person in an extraordinary situation. That she is able to sympathize with her captors has less to do with “Stockholm Syndrome” and more with Lindhout’s own dawning understanding of the immense privileges most Westerners enjoy when compared to the powerlessness of people living in failed countries such as Somalia. As a result, some of the most heartbreaking sections of the book are not those in which Amanda is being tortured, but those in which her captors reveal their small dreams of getting married or going to school, and the realization that the only way they think they can achieve their dreams is by kidnapping Westerners.

    The religious aspects of the book were also very compelling, as Lindhout gives the reader a ground-level view of Jihad by describing her captors and her captivity. Improbably, her story does not paint all Muslims as evil, rather, she manages to show the contradictions that exist within and between Muslims.

    [I listened to this as an audio book read by the author, something I usually avoid because authors are seldom trained performers. Ms. Lindhout’s reading was serviceable, and I understand the attraction of hearing a memoir in the voice of the person who wrote it, but I do think the story would have benefitted from the use of a voice actor. Increasing the speed of my player to 1.25 speed made the listening more bearable.]

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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