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Janice

ratings
24
REVIEWS
3
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
0
HELPFUL VOTES
4

  • Through the Eye of a Needle: Wealth, the Fall of Rome, and the Making of Christianity in the West, 350-550 AD

    • UNABRIDGED (31 hrs and 15 mins)
    • By Peter Brown
    • Narrated By Fleet Cooper
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (105)
    Performance
    (87)
    Story
    (84)

    Jesus taught his followers that it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter heaven. Yet by the fall of Rome, the church was becoming rich beyond measure. Through the Eye of a Needle is a sweeping intellectual and social history of the vexing problem of wealth in Christianity in the waning days of the Roman Empire, written by the world's foremost scholar of late antiquity.

    Jacobus says: "A learned, well-balanced postmodern history"
    "Striking reinterpretation of the fall of Rome"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Peter Brown is one of the best historians of Christianity today. In this book, he reexamines the role of Christianity in the collapse of the western Roman empire. Strikingly, he finds that christianity was part of the late Roman world not an attacking outsider. I really enjoyed it but I am a historian so I do like more academic approaches to history.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • America's First Great Depression: Economic Crisis and Political Disorder After the Panic of 1837

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 46 mins)
    • By Alasdair Roberts
    • Narrated By Kevin Young
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (13)
    Performance
    (10)
    Story
    (10)

    For a while, it seemed impossible to lose money on real estate. But then the bubble burst. The financial sector was paralyzed and the economy contracted. State and federal governments struggled to pay their domestic and foreign creditors. Washington was incapable of decisive action. The country seethed with political and social unrest. In America's First Great Depression, Alasdair Roberts describes how the United States dealt with the economic and political crisis that followed the Panic of 1837.

    Timothy says: "Excellent Story"
    "Interesting Political and Economic History"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I have to admit I was looking for a social history, focusing on how people responded to the depression, and this wasn't it. However, it is an interesting look at this turning point in American history. Robert's persuasively argues that this economic crisis pushed Americans to reconceive the role of state governments and their assumptions about economic growth. Most interestingly, Roberts demonstrates the complicated interrelationships between American popular belief in their destiny to expand across the continent, the military and diplomatic aspects of this expansion, and the reality that antebellum America economically depended on British investments, banks, and customers. Politicians might be guided by popular enthusiasm but they also had to contend with economic realities that might contradict the will of the people.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Black Death: A Personal History

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 24 mins)
    • By John Hatcher
    • Narrated By Geoffrey Centlivre
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (71)
    Performance
    (45)
    Story
    (45)

    In this fresh approach to the history of the Black Death, John Hatcher, a world-renowned scholar of the Middle Ages, recreates everyday life in a mid-14th-century rural English village. By focusing on the experiences of ordinary villagers as they lived - and died - during the Black Death (A.D. 1345-50), Hatcher vividly places the reader directly into those tumultuous years and describes in fascinating detail the day-to-day existence of people struggling with the tragic effects of the plague.

    N. Barnes says: "Beautiful narration for history geeks"
    "Riveting story"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    As a historian, I'm probably biased but I loved this as a work of microhistory -- taking a huge event and looking at its impact in a small world. If you are looking for a novel, it may be too dry but if you want a work of history, it's wonderful.

    4 of 5 people found this review helpful

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