Call anytime(888) 283-5051
 

You no longer follow Jan Rice

You will no longer see updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can re-follow a user if you change your mind.

OK

You now follow Jan Rice

You will receive updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can unfollow a user if you change your mind.

OK

Jan Rice

Member Since 2010

1
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 1 reviews
  • 1 ratings
  • 104 titles in library
  • 1 purchased in 2014
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
0

  • Empires of Trust: How Rome Built - and America Is Building - a New World

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 25 mins)
    • By Thomas F. Madden
    • Narrated By Richard Poe
    Overall
    (140)
    Performance
    (44)
    Story
    (43)

    In Empires of Trust, Professor Thomas F. Madden explores surprising parallels between the Roman and American republics. By making friends of enemies and demonstrating a commitment to fairness, the two republics - both "reluctant" yet unquestioned super-powers - built empires based on trust. Madden also includes vital lessons from the Roman Republic's 100-year struggle with "terrorism."

    Thomas says: "A real eye opener"
    "Power, advocacy and half-truths"
    Overall

    Three years ago I listened to the author's Modern Scholar lecture on early Christianity. On that basis I bought this book. Maybe I would hear that lecture with different ears now, but at the time I thought he was focused on facts.

    I agree with the reviewer who said some correction in perspective on America is needed. But do it through facts, not through oversimplification and slip-sliding over inconvenient truths. I just have room here for a couple of examples.

    First, re Judah Maccabee, Madden seemed to want to paint him as a friend of the Empire, so since he's painting Hellenized Jews as the good Jews, friends of the Empire, he didn't mention that Judah Maccabee's revolt was in large part a civil war against the radical Hellenizers among the Jews and he didn't go so easy on the moderate Hellenizers, either.

    Second, re Jesus, Madden avoided the fact that to the Romans he was just another one of those Jewish Messiah figures--not in this case a military leader--but if, as Madden says, the main threat to the Empire was religious insurrection, then it would be him & others like him the Romans and their Hellenized friends among the Jews especially wanted to execute during those tumultuous years. Not so consistent with who were the good guys according to Madden!

    I read a quote from Madden in a Modern Scholar catalog to the effect that knowing the past will help you not to repeat it, but the reverse is not true--current events do not help in explaining the past. If you retroject them back into the past you will get distortions. I think Madden breaks his own rule, and anyway I think it's too easy to make unpleasant generalities about people his audience loves to hate while cutting them--his audience--slack. He just bends over backward to be an apologist for Rome--and America.

    When the author gets to the end and talks about the fall of the Roman Empire, he finally says, It's complicated! Well, it's all complicated. More history, less polemic, please!

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.