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Snoodely

Member Since 2009

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  • 152 reviews
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  • Subterranean

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs)
    • By James Rollins
    • Narrated By John Meagher
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (200)
    Performance
    (85)
    Story
    (86)

    Travel to the bottom of the earth...to a place you never dreamed existed. Beneath the ice...a hand-picked team of specialists makes its way toward the center of the world. They are not the first to venture into this magnificient subterranean labyrinth. Those they follow did not return....

    David says: "Great story, funny Ausrtalian accent"
    "Claustrophobics: Avoid this book!"
    Overall
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    Story

    All other thriller-lovers might want to give this audiobook a listen ... especially since "Subterranean" is James Rollins first novel. As other reviewers have noted, this work does not show Rollins writing in his top form; but, rest assured, he keeps getting better and better. If, like me, you enjoy watching an author develop, then you should start watching Rollins with "Subterranean" ... unless you have claustrophobia. Claustrophobics should probably avoid Rollins altogether: Many of Rollins' novels take place under ground or underwater, in confined, dark spaces (not surprising, since Rollins is an amateur spelunker and scuba diver!). They provide plenty of thrills and chills for anyone with a moderate tolerance for far-fetched plots. Yes, "Subterranean" does postulate a slightly improbable scenario -- marsupial hominids (oops! Sorry, spoiler-haters.), undiscovered until now -- but, as Hamlet said, “There are more things in Heaven and Earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.” In his subsequent novels, Rollins unfolds many other fascinating, unlikely-yet-possible speculations. If you enjoy Preston/Child, then you will, most likely, enjoy Rollins.

    As for the reader, John Meagher, I say: Give him a try. At first his tenor voice put me off a bit, I admit. However, he turns out to have pretty good acting skills; and, like Rollins, he gets better. I have to take the Australian reviewer's word for Meagher's unconvincing Australian accent (it sounded O.K. to me); but, hey, Australian accents are hard to do!

    Not a bad thriller, for a first novel.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Safe House: A Burke Novel #10

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 14 mins)
    • By Andrew Vachss
    • Narrated By Phil Gigante
    Overall
    (19)
    Performance
    (11)
    Story
    (11)

    In Burke, Andrew Vachss gave readers of crime fiction a hero they could believe in, an avenger whose sense of justice was forged behind bars and tempered on New York’s meanest streets. In this blistering thriller, Burke is drawn into his ugliest case yet, one that involves an underground network of abused women and the sleekly ingenious stalkers who’ve marked them as their personal victims. Burke’s client is Crystal Beth, a beautiful outlaw with a tattoo on her face and a mission burned into her heart. She’s trying to shield one of her charges from a vengeful ex with fetishes for Nazism and torture.

    Snoodely says: "Not for Women ..."
    "Not for Women ..."
    Overall
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    Story

    ... unless you enjoy pornography, which I don't. Nonetheless, I am listening to Vachss entire Burke series, in sequence, because it does have some significant redeeming qualities: excellent writing, excellent plotting, and excellent narration. If only Andrew Vachss would stop indulging in his ridiculous male sexual fantasies .... (His books would end up a lot shorter!) You stand forewarned: You will hear the "F" word quite a lot. You will have to put up with a lot of misogyny. The female characters are constantly not only offering themselves to Burke, but literally 𝙛o𝙧𝙘𝙞𝙣𝙜 themselves upon him, poor guy. (Burke is described as not too good looking, not in very good shape, and he chain-smokes all day long. I guess that he must have something else going for him ....) We hear frequently about how much Burke is enjoying felatio, but not how he is offering the corresponding service to his partner. The female characters act dingy, and Burke calls them "little girl," or "bitch," interrupts them in the middle of their attempts to communicate with him, and treats them like dirt. ("I have had so much sex with so many women in my life. Some of them I even liked.") The only other author to whom I could even remotely compare Andrew Vachss would be James Ellroy; but Vachss writes even darker and angrier. I probably would never read the Burke series in print; but Phil Gigante's narration has me totally addicted. Gigante can do 𝙖𝙣𝙮𝙩𝙝𝙞𝙣𝙜. He has the most amazing vocal repertoire of any narrator that I have listened to. I don't even know, for sure, what his natural voice sound like, because he can do so many voices and so many accents so well. It almost justifies the purchase of one of Vachss' Burke series audiobooks just to hear Gigante doing Mama -- the Chinese matriarch of Burke's gang-𝘤𝗎𝘮-family. He does Mama spot-on. Gigante can not only do many different male voices in conversation with each other, but also many different female voices as well; and switch between them instantly when they interrupt each other. In short, I would recommend Vachss' Burke series to anyone who loves good acting, and to most male listeners; but don't start with "Safe House." You need to listen to the Burke series in chronological order, starting with "Flood," otherwise you will miss out on a lot of the ongoing story. Brace yourself for dark, angry, grimy, hard-boiled violence.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Footsteps of the Hawk

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 36 mins)
    • By Andrew Vachss
    • Narrated By Phil Gigante
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (20)
    Performance
    (11)
    Story
    (11)

    In Footsteps of the Hawk Burke himself is in danger of becoming a victim. Two rogue cops are stalking him. The coolly seductive Belinda Roberts wants him to free a man charged with a grisly string of rape-murders. The brutal and half-crazy Detective Jorge Morales may be trying to frame Burke for the same crimes.

    Snoodely says: "X-Rated Family"
    "X-Rated Family"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    In Burke's world, the word "family" means something different from what most of us think of as family. See, Burke never had a biological family -- his mother threw him away at birth, his father was unknown, and the State of New York (its orphanages, foster homes, and prison system) raised him -- so he had to grow a soul-family: fellow convicts, prostitutes, con artists, chiselers, and other bottom-feeders. I am just listening to Vachss' amazing Burke series for the first time in sequential order; and I am watching several penetrating qualities emerge, in the process. First: The Burke series is dark, savage, violent, not easy to listen to, and not for everybody. Second: The Burke series is all about 𝙛𝙖𝙢𝙞𝙡𝙮, according to Burke's definition. Third: Andrew Vachss is a brilliant, talented, sex-obsessed, angry, misogynistic author. Fourth (and this is what keeps me listening): Phil Gigante is a brilliant, immensely talented narrator; and the Vachss/Gigante team was made in heaven. Fifth: The Burke series really, 𝙧𝙚𝙖𝙡𝙡𝙮 needs to be listened to in sequence. Don't start here, with "Footsteps of the Hawk" (the eighth book in the series). It is not the best entry in the series, and you will miss a lot of character development. (The "family" members in this long-running saga -- and the ways in which they each get adopted into the "family" -- play an important role in the Burke series.) If you want to dive in, start at the beginning, with "Flood," and brace yourself for the chill.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Blue Belle: A Burke Novel #3

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 1 min)
    • By Andrew Vachss
    • Narrated By Phil Gigante
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (36)
    Performance
    (19)
    Story
    (20)

    In Andrew Vachss’s tautly engrossing novel, Burke is given a purse full of dirty money to find the infamous Ghost Van that is cutting a lethal swath among the teenage prostitutes in the hood. He also gets help in the form of a stripper named Belle, whose moves on the runway are outclassed only by what she can do in a getaway car.

    Rachel Malcolm says: "not enough story to stay interested"
    "Too much porn, smoking, anger, misogyny, ..."
    Overall
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    ... and 𝙬𝙖𝙮 too much filatio. Although Andrew Vachss' Burke series started promisingly with "Flood;" by "Blue Belle" -- the third entry in the series -- Vachss has sunk far too deeply into male sexual fantasies and outright pornography, marring his otherwise excellent writing and plotting. I think that I will continue listening to a few more entries in the Burke series only because I enjoy narrator Phil Gigante's amazing acting skills so much, and because I am hoping that Vachss will eventually get over it. (I am currently listening to "Blossom" -- the fifth entry in the series -- and I think that it may be taking a turn for the better.) Also, if Burke doesn't stop chain-smoking pretty soon, he is going to die, anyway. (The Burke series went on for 18 entries, up to 2008's "Another Life," so maybe both Vachss and his protagonist got their acts together.) I am not quite ready to give up on Burke just yet ... but "Blue Belle" gets pretty disgusting sometimes.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Flood: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 10 mins)
    • By Andrew Vachss
    • Narrated By Christopher Lane
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (146)
    Performance
    (66)
    Story
    (70)

    Burke's newest client is a woman named Flood, who has the face of an angel, the body of a high-priced stripper, and the skills of a professional executioner. She wants Burke to find a monster for her - so she can kill him with her bare hands. In this thriller, Andrew Vachss's renegade private eye teams up with a lethally gifted avenger to follow a child's murderer through the catacombs of New York, where every alley is blind and the penthouses are as dangerous as the basements.

    A User says: "This is a great book!"
    "Noir!"
    Overall
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    Story

    Think "Sin City." (If you have not yet seen the remarkable 2005 movie, "Sin City," see if you can rent it or borrow it. If you like "Sin City," you will like "Flood.") Imagine Clive Owen playing Burke. Somebody (Quentin Tarantino or Robert Rodriguez) should film this book. Talk about New York's 𝙨𝙚𝙖𝙢𝙮 𝙪𝙣𝙙𝙚𝙧𝙗𝙚𝙡𝙡𝙮! "Flood" combines the hard-boiled detective fiction of the '40s and '50s (think Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler on steroids) -- including all the smoking (OMG, Burke, will you quit smoking before you kill yourself?) with "Sin City"'s over-the-top noir -- including the (unintentionally?) funny male sexual fantasies. Our protagonist, Burke (just one name, thank you very much ... how cool is 𝙩𝙝𝙖𝙩?) has had a hard life, which has made him tough and cynical. He now mixes with the dregs of society -- the hookers (with hearts of gold, of course), the thieves, the con artists, the convicts, the rejects, the bottom-feeders, and the low-lifes. But wait: Burke has 𝙨𝙩𝙖𝙣𝙙𝙖𝙧𝙙𝙨! You will enjoy watching him take out the trash. What you need to know about author Andrew Vachss is that he is a practicing attorney who devotes himself to protecting abused children; and his protagonist in the Burke series had been abused in childhood. Now Burke deals out revenge to all abusers. I rank narrator Christopher Lane as one of my favorite voice actors: He has a beautiful voice 𝙖𝙣𝙙 chops. I liked "Flood" so much that, before I had even finished listening to it, I went ahead and purchased the next audiobook in the series, "Strega," to which I have almost finished listening now. I recommend "Flood" to any aficionado of old-fashioned, hard-boiled noir.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Identical

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 52 mins)
    • By Scott Turow
    • Narrated By Henry Leyva
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (260)
    Performance
    (215)
    Story
    (215)

    Identical, based loosely on the myth of Castor and Pollux, is the story of identical twins, Paul and Cass Giannis, and the complex relationships between their family and their former neighbors, the Kronons. The audiobook focuses principally on events in 2008, when Paul is a candidate for Mayor of Kindle County, and Cass is released from the penitentiary, 25 years after pleading guilty to the murder of his girlfriend, Athena Kronon.

    Jacqueline says: "Courtroom Drama Takes a Back Seat"
    "Turow Fans: Don't Get Stuck."
    Overall
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    Yes, "Identical" presents us with a bit of a departure for Turow, particularly if you love his wonderful courtroom scenes; but try to keep your mind open to something new from Turow. You will still find some good courtroom scenes here -- actually, some pretty brilliant legal thinking from Judge Du Bois Lands -- but mostly, in "Identical," Turow is branching off into something like Jeffrey Archer territory: a family drama enacted over decades. For example, if you liked Archer's "Sons of Fortune," then you might enjoy Turow's "Identical." Of course, identical twins present a wealth of plot possibilities for a novelist; and Turow takes full advantage of them to create an intriguing mystery. For instance, did you know that identical twins do not have 𝒆𝙭𝙖𝙘𝙩𝙡𝙮 identical DNA, nor 𝒆𝙭𝙖𝙘𝙩𝙡𝙮 identical fingerprints? Turow uses this phenomenon to construct a legal puzzle. I would not call "Identical" a legal thriller, like Turow's previous offerings. Rather, I would put it more into the legal mystery/drama genre, á 𝘭𝘢 Jeffrey Archer. Although I wouldn't rank narrator Henry Leyva among my favorite narrators, he does have a nice voice, and does an adequate job of reading "Identical" for us. Overall, I would recommend "Identical" to mystery-lovers, and even to Turow fans, as long as you keep your mind open to a departure from form.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Murder Inside the Beltway

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 9 mins)
    • By Margaret Truman
    • Narrated By Patrick Lawlor
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (16)
    Performance
    (6)
    Story
    (6)

    A Washington call girl is found bludgeoned to death in her Adams-Morgan apartment. As police detectives scour the apartment, they find a digital video camera nestled high among books on a shelf. Had she used the camera to video some of her clients during their sexual romps? Then they discover a small, book-sized DVD case, full with the exception of two slots. Could they possibly get lucky? Is the murder on one of those disks?

    Brenda says: "Awful Narrator"
    "Political Cynicism from One who Ought to Know"
    Overall
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    "Murder inside the Beltway" was Margaret Truman's final entry in her long-running Capital Crimes series. (She died in 2008 -- the year of this novel's publication -- although the popular series is now being continued by other authors.) All of the Capital Crimes novels are murder mysteries set in Washington, D.C., with its attendant political backdrop. I have listened to many of the Capitol Crimes audiobooks, and someday hope to listen to them all, in chronological order. (Most of them have not yet been recorded, and Audible does not carry many of those that have, as of this writing.) I have noticed that, as the series progressed, so did Ms Truman's cynicism with Washington politics. "Murder inside the Beltway" takes political cynicism to its inevitable conclusion. See if this quote from the novel reminds you of any recent events:

    “The Pyle administration had set the standard for lying away its misdeeds: a callous economic policy, leaving millions behind; disastrous foreign incursions sold to the American public through out-and-out falsehoods; abject corruption in myriad agencies and departments; and a litany of disasters that would seem to ensure a one-term presidency.”

    Regarding Washington politics, Margaret Truman frequently quotes her famous father's statement: "If you want a friend in Washington, get a dog." As with the other Capital Crimes entries, in "Murder inside the Beltway" Truman weaves police procedurals in with the political shenanigans. Here, we have some police shenanigans woven in, as well, including a bad cop on the take. I deducted a star from my overall rating of this audiobook, only because the character development of this bad cop -- Walt Hatcher, a bigoted, foul-mouthed, corrupt veteran of the D.C. Metropolitan Police Department -- has a sweet, but inconsistent and unbelievable relationship with his wife. Otherwise, "Murder inside the Beltway" has a well-developed, intriguing plot.

    The narrator, Patrick Lawlor, does have an odd voice, as some other reviewers have pointed out; but he does have some acting chops, including the perfect, raspy voice for the unlikable Walt Hatcher. What he lacks in vocal repertoire he can frequently compensate for with inflection. I didn't mind his voice; but I suggest that, if you are contemplating purchasing this audiobook, you listen to the 4-minute sample that Audible provides, to see if Lawlor's voice bothers you. Otherwise, I recommend this audiobook to all mystery/thriller fans.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Night Monster: A Novel of Suspense

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 27 mins)
    • By James Swain
    • Narrated By Peter Jay Fernandez
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (18)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    Tough-as-nails abduction specialist Jack Carpenter is not easily spooked. But when he witnesses his daughter's college basketball teammate being violently abducted, Jack cannot suppress his horror. The kidnapper's face is one Jack recognizes from an unsolved case early in his career on the police force. With a deadly clock ticking, Jack is determined to rescue the abducted girl before it's too late.

    Snoodely says: "Jack Carpenter meets Tony Valentine: Yay!"
    "Jack Carpenter meets Tony Valentine: Yay!"
    Overall
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    Story

    "The Night Monster" is the third -- and, as of this writing, the most recent -- entry in Swain's Jack Carpenter series. However, I do not think that Swain will let the series end here; because in this novel our hero -- Jack Carpenter -- meets and works with Swain's previous protagonist, Tony Valentine (whom I miss, and gladly welcomed back). In case you have not yet listened to any of the Jack Carpenter audiobooks -- or any of the Tony Valentine audiobooks, for that matter -- I would suggest backtracking a bit before you start "The Night Monster," and listen to some of Swain's previous entries in both series. Swain started off with the captivating Tony Valentine series, which followed the adventures of a P.I. specializing in catching gambling cheaters. The Tony Valentine series had seven fascinating entries, running through 2006, and ranging all over the U.S. map -- wherever gambling casinos can be found. Then Swain began the Jack Carpenter series (with only three episodes, so far), following a South Florida P.I. with an entirely different specialty: locating missing children. Then, in 2012, Swain entered the burgeoning supernatural detective genre with his wonderfully entertaining Peter Warlock series, taking place in New York City. Is this author versatile, or what? He not only has versatility, he also possesses 𝙩𝙖𝙡𝙚𝙣𝙩: in both the writing and plotting departments. Plus, he keeps getting better. I have not regretted for a moment having invested in Swain's entire audiobook o𝙚𝒖𝙫𝙧𝙚. However -- recognizing that you may not want to make such a large investment sight unseen -- I would suggest listening to "Sucker Bet" before starting "The Night Monster," just so you can first meet Tony Valentine in approximately the same environment where you will re-encounter him here.

    I like narrator Peter J. Fernandez' voice and acting skills just fine in "The Night Monster." I appreciate that he reads slowly and enunciates clearly; however, I suspect that his slow delivery may irritate some listeners. I would suggest listening to the sample that Audible provides, before purchasing "The Night Monster," if you think that slow narration may turn you off. Otherwise, I recommend this audiobook to anyone who enjoys mystery-thrillers with ingenious, complex plots.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Loaded Dice

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 52 mins)
    • By James Swain
    • Narrated By Paul Boehmer
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (21)
    Performance
    (3)
    Story
    (3)

    Hard-boiled ex-cop Tony Valentine has a new profession: spotting casino cheats and exposing a casino's flaws to the owners. Now he must unravel the mystery of an amateur player impossibly raking in the dough on blackjack. However, his investigation stirs up a hornet's nest worth of problems.

    Snoodely says: "Terrorists in Vegas"
    "Terrorists in Vegas"
    Overall
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    Although Audible has not yet designated it as such, "Loaded Dice" actually comes fourth in Swain's Tony Valentine series. Unfortunately, the first two entries in the series -- "Grift Sense" and "Funny Money" -- have not yet been recorded on audiobooks, as far as I know; so we have no choice but to start in the middle of this entertaining series. (I always prefer to listen to series novels in chronological order.) I recommend listening to "Sucker Bet" (#3 in the Tony Valentine series) before starting "Loaded Dice," just to pick up some backstory: Tony Valentine, retired Atlantic City cop, now works as a consultant to gambling casinos, exposing grifters. I enjoy this series a great deal. Swain clearly knows whereof he speaks, showing us the many -- frequently cunningly clever -- ways in which people can cheat the gambling establishments out of large sums. Most of these tricks involve deft sleight-of-hand, almost like that practiced by magicians. In "Loaded Dice," we get the additional element of Muslim terrorists thrown in, as well. Clearly this series will not suit everybody; however, I think that anybody who enjoys poker or craps or Las Vegas will probably get a kick out of all of James Swain's Tony Valentine novels. Narrator Paul Boehmer does not have a beautiful voice, but does a better-than-adequate job narrating "Loaded Dice."

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Triple Cross: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 17 mins)
    • By Mark T. Sullivan
    • Narrated By Lloyd James
    Overall
    (17)
    Performance
    (3)
    Story
    (3)

    It's New Year's Eve at the Jefferson Club, a luxurious private ski resort in the mountains of southwestern Montana. Seven of the world's wealthiest men and a U.S. senator are among the guests gathered in the ballroom of the club's spectacular main lodge for a private party. Expensive champagne flows, and multibillion-dollar deals are getting done, when, at the stroke of midnight, a ruthless and well-armed militia attacks the club.

    Snoodely says: "Right Goal, Wrong Method. No! Wrong Goal, Too!"
    "Right Goal, Wrong Method. No! Wrong Goal, Too!"
    Overall
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    Story

    The title, "Triple Cross," has a dual meaning, here, referring not only to the 14-year-old triplet children of protagonist Mickey Hennessy -- who play a significant part in the story -- but also to the three-phase unfolding of the villains' motives. At first, we kind of get behind the invaders' stated goals:

    "The government has become a mouthpiece for the corporations, no matter what political party holds power. ... The future lies in a third direction, through a dangerous crossroads, where global corporate power has to be challenged, held accountable, and defeated."

    Indeed, the invaders call themselves "The Third Position Army," allegedly offering an alternative to international corporate greed and corruption. They propose to try the worst offenders in the Court of Public Opinion -- live over the internet -- allowing the People to vote on the guilt of these Bad Boys, then proposing appropriate punishment. Accordingly, a fat cat senator is tried first, his indiscretions exposed, the People vote him guilty by the millions, and the Third Position Army sentences him to humiliating public exposure. Just deserts, right?

    But wait -- then the Army starts going overboard, killing people. Oops. Now they are behaving as badly as the Bad Guys. We feel betrayed! By the end, we get betrayed yet again: Triple Cross.

    "Triple Cross" is not a deep, important book; but it entertains well. It has a plausible, interesting, exciting plot with likable protagonists. Narrator Lloyd James does not have a beautiful voice, but does a pretty good job distinguishing the characters from one another. I recommend this audiobook to anyone looking for fun escape fiction.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • The Skorpion Directive: A Micah Dalton Thriller

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 49 mins)
    • By David Stone
    • Narrated By Jason Culp
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (102)
    Performance
    (22)
    Story
    (22)

    In Vienna for a top-secret meeting with ex-Mossad agent Issadore Galan, Micah Dalton senses that something is very wrong on the streets of the Ring District. Dalton's aggressive response to enemy surveillance makes him the target of a complex plot with the potential to shatter America's strategic alliances with the rest of the civilized world.

    Robert says: "Stone delivers another excellent adventure "
    "'Delusions of Adequacy'"
    Overall
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    Story

    First, I think that I should tell you why you might 𝙣o𝙩 want to purchase "The Skorpion Directive," as this novel will not suit everyone. Don't buy this audiobook if you have not yet listened its Micah Dalton series predecessors -- starting with "The Echelon Vendetta" (2007) -- because you will miss out on the continuity and some of the allusions. Secondly, don't buy this audiobook if you object to right-wing proselytizing. Yes, David Stone has a right-of-center political stance ... but, then, so do Tom Clancy, Patrick Robinson, Stephen Hunter, and most of the other Military Thriller writers. I consider myself to have pretty liberal sensibilities -- and I am sticking to them! -- but I would regret missing out on these writers who, despite their right-wing stances, offer us some pretty exciting stories. Stone, in particular, is not only a good story-teller, but also a surprisingly good writer. Some of his descriptions qualify as poetry ... but he does proselytize:

    "Here, at the end of my life, I've come to realize that the only reliable law is the law of unintended consequences. This new administration [referring to the Obama administration], for the most part, is neither stupid nor blindly partisan ... although some of the younger staffers at the White House seem to think it clever to act like junkyard dogs, as if political combat were the same as actual combat. But, then, when the young Turks in any new government aren't prating to their elders, they're preening in their shaving mirrors. They all share the same delusions of adequacy. The previous administration persuaded itself that it had the power to impose a kind of Junior-League Republicanism on murderous tribal theocracies. The new one imagines that it can impose the asinine Marcusian sophistries of Norm Chompsky and the Harvard faculty of humanities on the people of America; as if Socialism had not already been tried many times before, only to collapse in ruins -- frequently very bloody ruins. And God only knows what sort of grotesque ideological calliope the next army of enthusiasts will ride in on, horns blatting and banners ablaze. My consolation is that I'll probably not be around when the wheels fall off again."

    In his Micah Dalton series, Stone consistently pursues an agenda: The C.I.A. should be allowed to do its job, unencumbered with liberal fetters. He makes a pretty good case for this agenda, showing through Micah Dalton's tribulations how the C.I.A. agents are hampered by government restrictions. In his Micah Dalton series, Stone has Dalton endure some hair-raising, terrifyingly realistic adventures. Don't buy 𝙖𝙣𝙮 of Stone's Micah Dalton audiobooks if graphic descriptions of violence make you queazy.

    The narrator of "The Skorpion Directive," Jason Culp, has a slightly odd voice, but very good acting skills. He has many voices and accents at his command to distinguish all the characters from one another. I would recommend "The Skorpion Directive" to anyone who enjoys the Military Thriller genre, with the above-mentioned caveats.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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