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Snoodely

Santa Barbara, CA United States | Member Since 2017

1736
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 179 reviews
  • 298 ratings
  • 1227 titles in library
  • 39 purchased in 2018
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  • Betrayal: A Dismas Hardy Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 43 mins)
    • By John Lescroart
    • Narrated By David Colacci
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (187)
    Performance
    (105)
    Story
    (103)

    When Dismas Hardy agrees to clean up the caseload of recently disappeared attorney Charlie Bowen, he thinks it will be easy. But one of the cases is far from small-time - the appeal to overturn the murder conviction of National Guard reservist Evan Scholler, who has been sentenced to life without parole for the murder of an ex-Navy SEAL and private contractor named Ron Nolan. Two rapid-fire events in Iraq conspired to bring the men into fatal conflict.

    Cholmondeley says: "Not enough Dismas; too much back-story"
    "The best Lescroart yet"
    Overall

    With "Betrayal," John Lescroart departs a bit from his ongoing San Francisco series of novels. For one thing, part of the action takes place -- as a flashback -- in Iraq, unveiling some of the sobering corruption taking place there at our government's expense. Secondly, much of the subsequent action takes place not in San Francisco, but down the Peninsula in Redwood City. We still have Lescroart's perennial protagonists -- best friends Dismus Hardy and Abe Glitsky, defense attorney and cop -- working together to discover the hidden machinations that sent an innocent man to prison. But this time they don't enter center stage until midway through the story. Lescroart definitely did his homework for this novel, delving deep beyond his legal and law-enforcement expertise into the ugly underbelly of the Iraq war and the unscrupulous contractors capitalizing on it. But, as always, he also delves deep into the hearts and minds of his characters, making them real to us, and making us care about them. Also, as always, David Colacci does a magnificent job narrating this audiobook. He has a wide range of voices and accents to draw upon, clearly distinguishing the characters from each other. I recommend this audiobook to anybody who enjoys legal thrillers with heart.

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • In the Crosshairs: A Sniper Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 29 mins)
    • By Jack Coughlin, Donald A. Davis
    • Narrated By Luke Daniels
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (223)
    Performance
    (209)
    Story
    (209)

    The Central Intelligence Agency is under attack, and so is its top field operative, Kyle Swanson. The highly decorated former marine corps gunnery sergeant is attending the funeral of a friend when a terrorist blows up the grave. A week later he narrowly survives a grenade attack in Berlin. In Washington, Congress is being told that Swanson has been turned, his private employer is corrupt, and the agency itself cannot be trusted.

    Mischasmom says: "YAY! Welcome Back Luke Daniels!"
    "Bummed 'cause I Have to Wait for the Next Episode!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I just listened to this entire series, episode-by-episode, and now I want to go on to the next one … Only, it has not been published yet! Don't you hate it when that happens?

    I recommend the "Sniper" series to all fans of military thrillers. It has the bonus that you can start listening anywhere in the series without feeling lost: Coughlin and Davis do a good job of filling us in on all the characters and backstory that we will need to enjoy the current episode. Fans of Daniel Silva’s Gabriel Allon series will see a certain similarity between the two series: Both tell us exciting, well-plotted stories about an aging assassin-with-a-heart. You will not find the literary caliber of the Gabriel Allon series here in the Sniper series; but, in some ways, the Sniper series offers us more escape-fiction enjoyment. After all, Reality kinda sucks sometimes, right? Think of the Sniper series as Summer Blockbuster-ready material, or a really good graphic novel: Boom! Pow! Oof! All the bad guys are unconditionally, irredeemably bad; so we do not mind at all when our hero, Kyle Swanson, blows them away, even with the explicit description. At the same time, Coughlin and Davis give us, in Kyle Swanson, a believable and likable hero, who does not get away unscathed by the way he earns his living.

    Now, I am going to pay Luke Daniels the highest compliment that you can pay to an actor: You hardly notice him. He is that good. He has so many voices and so many accents that you feel like you are listening to a multi-actor performance. I think that he could make a bad book sound good … and here, he has good material to work with!

    If you are OCD, like me, start at the beginning of this series -- with "Kill Zone" -- and watch how the episodes keep getting better and better. On the other hand, if you are ADD, start here, with "In the Crosshairs" -- or anywhere you like in the series, for that matter -- and listen to the episodes in any order you please. Enjoyment guaranteed, either way.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Long Shot: A Sniper Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 39 mins)
    • By Jack Coughlin, Donald A. Davis
    • Narrated By Scott Sowers
    Overall
    (223)
    Performance
    (217)
    Story
    (217)

    A top Russian intelligence agent has defected to the West, and the only man with whom he will speak is Kyle Swanson, who busted him out of the US Marine Corps Scout/Sniper School years ago. The defector proves to be an Edward Snowden-type gold mine of amazing secrets about the when, where and how of President Vladimir Pushkin's next grab for lost Soviet territory. But Swanson, now a special contractor with the CIA, soon begins to believe that it is all fool's gold being sprinkled by Moscow to ignite an open military fight with NATO and the United States.

    nolynn says: "Narrator killed it for me."
    ""Sniper" Series Just Keeps Getting Better"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I would recommend this entire series to anyone who enjoys military thrillers. Unlike most other thriller-genre series, you can actually get away with listening to the "Sniper" series out of order: Coughlin and Davis do a good job of filling us in on all the characters and back-story that we need to know. In fact, I would recommend starting with "Long Shot", so you will not experience the narrator-change-in-the-middle-of-the-series shock that everyone is complaining about. Fear not: Scott Sowers does a fine job of narrating "Long Shot". I dare say that, had he been narrating this series from the beginning, few of us would have given him a bad rating. Only, we are comparing him with an impossibly high standard. Sowers does not have quite as nice a voice as Luke Daniels, and he uses a different style and timing than Daniels does, but he still has a wide range of voices and accents at his disposal, and does an excellent job distinguishing all the characters. If other reviewers’ bad ratings are giving you pause, I would suggest that you listen to the five-minute sample that Audible provides here, and see if Sowers’ performance really bothers you. I have no hesitation giving him five stars, while still looking forward to getting Luke Daniels back.

    By the way: If the Publisher’s Summary above leads you to believe that our Sniper hero makes a 100-mile shot in "Long Shot", and you are going, "Yeah, sure" … Don’t worry — It is even better than that! Check it out.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Charlatans

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 58 mins)
    • By Robin Cook
    • Narrated By George Guidall
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (503)
    Performance
    (456)
    Story
    (456)

    Newly minted chief resident at Boston Memorial Hospital Noah Rothauser is swamped in his new position, from managing the surgical schedules to dealing with the fallouts from patient deaths. Known for its medical advances, the famed teaching hospital has fitted several ORs as "hybrid operating rooms of the future" - an improvement that seems positive until an anesthesia error during a routine procedure results in the death of an otherwise healthy man.

    donna says: "Social engineering at its best"
    "Something to Offend Everybody"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I agree with other reviewers that "Charlatans" might not qualify as Robin Cook’s best effort to date … although, in general, his medical thrillers have been improving with each outing since his first 1977 effort, "Coma". With the exception of "Charlatans", Dr. Cook’s thrillers always address some important, urgent, frequently egregious issue relating to our dysfunctional medical care system. These issues generally boil down to human greed introducing corruption into the system: the insurance racket, big Pharma, hospital politics, and the like. However, in "Charlatans", Cook addresses the evils of … social media? … nutritional supplements? Yeah, I know.

    Listeners who have had trouble relating to Cook’s previous novels might find "Charlatans" a bit more accessible than the others, because it indulges in less "medical-speak" than they do. None-the-less, I hesitate to recommend this novel to anyone who has not listened to any other samples of Dr. Cook’s oeuvre, because it just does not represent the captivating story-telling caliber that he normally offers us. On the other hand, veteran, silky-voiced, master narrator George Guidall delivers his usual skillful performance, given the material he has to work with here. Bottom line: Skip this one, unless — like me — you are a long-time Robin Cook fan.

    8 of 9 people found this review helpful
  • The Lost Order: Cotton Malone, Book 12

    • UNABRIDGED (32 hrs and 11 mins)
    • By Steve Berry
    • Narrated By Scott Brick
    Overall
    (855)
    Performance
    (785)
    Story
    (787)

    The Knights of the Golden Circle was the largest and most dangerous clandestine organization in American history. It amassed billions in stolen gold and silver, all buried in hidden caches across the United States. Since 1865 treasure hunters have searched, but little of that immense wealth has ever been found. Now, 160 years later, two factions of what remains of the Knights of the Golden Circle want that lost treasure - one to spend it for their own ends, the other to preserve it.

    Snoodely says: "History Lesson … So’s You’ll Enjoy It!"
    "History Lesson … So’s You’ll Enjoy It!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    If you are looking for lyrical prose … look elsewhere. Each time I start a Steve Berry audiobook, his awkward writing style drives me nearly to distraction for a while … until I loosen up my pedantic OCD a bit, and resign myself to just enjoying the story’s plot. If good writing matters to you, but you also love intelligent thrillers, then here is your dilemma: Steve Berry is not a natural-born writer, like, say, Cormac McCarthy, or Elizabeth Peters, or James Lee Burke. However, he is a natural-born historian, and his passion for history shines through in his Cotton Malone thrillers. If, like me, you had a history allergy in school, let Steve Barry make it fun and exciting for you. Each Cotton Malone episode teaches us a fascinating history lesson by way of a hair-raising, nail-biting, edge-of-your-seat adventure. At the end of each story in the Cotton Malone series, Mr. Berry provides us with an author’s note revealing which aspects of the plot were drawn from actual historical events, and which aspects derived from his imagination. I predict that this revelation will surprise you: Frequently the most far-fetched parts of the novel turn out to have actually happened. In “The Lost Order” I learned more about the Civil War, the Smithsonian Institution, and the United States Government than I ever absorbed in school. As an extra, added bonus for Cotton Malone fans: We finally learn, here in “The Lost Order”, how Cotton got his moniker! So, here is my advice to all thriller-lovers contemplating purchasing “The Lost Order”: Temporarily forget everything you learned in English class, and prepare yourself for a Dan-Brown-esque thriller, with cryptic maps, puzzles, codes, clues, cyphers, multi-generational secret societies, and even a secret hand-shake. BTW: This Audible version of “The Lost Order” offers you two renderings of this audiobook: the first one without Mr. Berry’s interspersed commentary, and the second with it. I listened to both renderings, and recommend that you consider doing so, too, in the prescribed order. Mr. Berry’s commentary supplies both enlightening and entertaining historical insight into the story.

    23 of 23 people found this review helpful
  • The Prisoner: A John Wells Novel, Book 11

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 22 mins)
    • By Alex Berenson
    • Narrated By George Guidall
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1142)
    Performance
    (1055)
    Story
    (1047)

    Evidence is mounting that someone high up in the CIA is doing the unthinkable - passing messages to ISIS, alerting them to planned operations. Finding out the mole's identity without alerting him, however, will be very hard, and to accomplish it Wells will have to do something he thought he'd left behind forever. He will have to reassume his former identity as an al Qaeda jihadi, get captured, and go undercover to befriend an ISIS prisoner in a secret Bulgarian prison.

    Snoodely says: "Another Winner from Berenson"
    "Another Winner from Berenson"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    If you love thrillers, than you have probably already discovered Alex Berenson’s John Wells series, and you already know Well’s backstory. If not, I recommend that you start at the beginning of this series, with “The Faithful Spy,” and, ideally, listen to all the prior episodes in this series before beginning “The Prisoner.” Otherwise, this audiobook might seem to move a bit quickly.

    Like most thrillers, “The Prisoner” tells a fantastic story involving a super-human protagonist in an impossible situation. Berenson enriches this recipe with his encyclopedic knowledge of history, government, geo-politics, current events, and geography. He seasons the pot with more than a dash of cynicism and good writing skills. All his descriptions of locales — which, by the way, span the globe in this series — convey spot-on detail and accuracy, conjuring up a vivid movie in the listener’s mind’s eye.

    In “The Prisoner,” we get to know the identity of the CIA mole almost from the beginning of the story, while John Wells and Ellis Shafer must struggle against the clock for the rest of the book, trying to track the traitor down. Berenson gives us some understanding of the mole’s motives for betraying his country — if not for his methods — by describing the horrors that he witnessed the CIA perpetrating in Iraq and Afghanistan. (“Buy off anyone who is for sale, and kill the rest.”) We also get disturbingly vivid descriptions of the even worse horrors that the Islamist jihadists are perpetrating on those who hold opinions or ideologies that differ from their own. (We can clearly see the source of Berenson’s cynicism.)

    As always, masterful George Guidall delivers an excellent performance of “The Prisoner,” with his beautiful, mature voice, perfect timing, and subtle inflections.

    11 of 11 people found this review helpful
  • The Twenty-Three

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 24 mins)
    • By Linwood Barclay
    • Narrated By Richard Poe, Brian O’Neill
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (110)
    Performance
    (100)
    Story
    (99)

    Everything has been leading to this. It's the Saturday of Memorial Day weekend, May 23rd, and the small town of Promise Falls, New York, has found itself in the midst of a full-blown catastrophe. Hundreds of people are going to the hospital with similar flu-like symptoms - and dozens have died. Investigators quickly zero in on the water supply. But the question for many, including private investigator Cal Weaver, remains: Who would benefit from a mass poisoning of this town?

    Snoodely says: "Don’t Drink the Water ..."
    "Don’t Drink the Water ..."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    ... and never visit Promise Falls! Promise Falls, Upstate NY, is having a really bad month. Okay, I am pretty sure that Promise Falls does not really exist (I could not find it in my Maps app); but Mr. Barclay makes it feel awfully real in his Promise Falls series. In any case, I suggest that you visit there only virtually, via this audiobook series, because Promise Falls is turning into a dangerous place to live! However, you really, really must start from the beginning, with “Broken Promise.” In fact, if you want to get properly diligent about it, you should first listen to Barclay's “Too Close to Home,” “Never Look Away,” and “A Tap on the Window,” in order to learn the full back-story on the characters that re-appear in the Promise Falls series. (BTW: I suspect that we will be hearing more from Barclay about Promise Falls, because he leaves a few plot threads dangling here in “The Twenty-Three.” I cannot wait for the next episode!)

    Mr. Barclay uses a clever technique in this Promise Falls series, where each entry features a different character, who gets to speak in the first person. First, out-of-work newspaper reporter David Harwood (whom we learned about in “Never Look Away”) tells the story from his point-of-view in “Broken Promise.” Then, private investigator Cal Weaver (from “A Tap on the Window”) picks up the story in “Far from True.” Finally, police detective Barry Duckworth (introduced in “Too Close to Home”) tells us about Promise Falls’ poisoned-water mystery here in “The Twenty-Three.” You will like Barry Duckworth. He has smarts, intuition, diligence … and an inordinate sweet-tooth. What’s not to like?

    In each of the Promise Falls series so far, the publishers used two narrators: one to voice the featured character, and one to narrate the rest of the story. “The Twenty-Three” has the best pair of narrators in this series, in my opinion. I especially liked Richard Poe’s depiction of Detective Barry Duckworth. Poe believably conveys not only Duckworth’s investigative thought processes, but also his — funny! — battle with doughnuts; and Poe capably voices the other characters with whom Duckworth dialogues.

    Bottom Line: If you like mysteries, then buy this audiobook … but first listen to its prequels in the Promise Falls series.

    6 of 6 people found this review helpful
  • A Tap on the Window

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 15 mins)
    • By Linwood Barclay
    • Narrated By Mark Zeisler
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (501)
    Performance
    (454)
    Story
    (453)

    International best-selling author Linwood Barclay delivers pulse-pounding suspense that puts him among the masters of the genre. A Tap on the Window finds private investigator Cal Weaver making an ill-advised decision to pick up a young female hitchhiker who reminds him of his dead son. But something is off about the girl, and Cal is soon drawn into a host of nightmarish secrets.

    shelley says: "5 Stars for Tap on the Window"
    "Deceit, Sadness, Anger … & World-Class Plotting"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    When I wrote, “World-Class Plotting,” I was referring to Linwood Barclay’s masterful story-telling; however, I could just as well have been describing his characters’ sneaky, deceitful shenanigans within the plot. Yikes! This audiobook has positively Deaver-esque twists, red herrings, and tangles-within-tangles. When you listen to any of Barclay’s novels, do not ever think that you have solved the mystery: I guarantee you — you have been cleverly misled.

    I only recently discovered Mr. Barclay’s oeuvre. (I started with his 2012 novel, “Trust Your Eyes,” and I liked it so much that I back-tracked and purchased all of the Barclay audiobooks that I could get on Audible!) I have discovered a few dark themes that seem to penetrate all of his works: They all seem to tell us stories about families, with some sub-current of sadness, tragedy, deceit, loss, and anger running through their lives. Double that for “A Tap on the Window.” This darkness disturbs me a bit — because my audiobook listening always affects me emotionally — but Barclay’s magnificent plotting and excellent writing overcomes all of my emotional hesitation. (When I rate an audiobook, I always ask myself: Will I be listening to this book/series/author again? Well, I will definitely be listening to all of Barclay’s audiobooks again, plus all of his future offerings.)

    Narrator Mark Zeisler has an attractive, slightly husky, mature voice, and he does a good job of narrating “A Tap on the Window.” However, he does not have the range of voices to distinguish the characters from one another adequately, in my opinion: Sometimes I felt a little confusion as to which character was speaking during the dialogues. For this reason — because I value the Performance as much as the Story in my audiobooks — I have docked Mr. Zeisler's narration one star in my rating. Nonetheless, I recommend “A Tap on the Window” to all mystery lovers — fans of Jeffery Deaver, especially, will like all of Barclay’s novels — as long as you can tolerate a bit (well … more than a bit, actually) of darkness and sadness in the story.

    10 of 11 people found this review helpful
  • The Tears of Dark Water

    • UNABRIDGED (18 hrs and 6 mins)
    • By Corban Addison
    • Narrated By Korey Jackson
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (137)
    Performance
    (121)
    Story
    (123)

    Daniel and Vanessa Parker are an American success story. He is a Washington, DC power broker, and she is a doctor with a thriving practice. But behind the facade, their marriage is a shambles, and their teenage son, Quentin, is self-destructing. In desperation, Daniel dusts off a long-delayed dream - a sailing trip around the world. Little does he know that the voyage he hopes will save them may destroy them instead.

    Snoodely says: "Best of Both: Entertainment & Learning"
    "Best of Both: Entertainment & Learning"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I thank Audible for offering “The Tears of Dark Water” as a Deal-of-the-Day, because I probably would never have discovered this audiobook otherwise. I do not know if I would recommend “The Tears of Dark Water” to everyone — nor even to all thriller lovers — because it gives the listener a bit of a harrowing ride. Although it does qualify as a thriller, I would never call it Escape Fiction. I do not think that you will want to take this audiobook to the beach, for example. Corban Addison clearly knows his subject matter — which includes Somalian piracy, all things maritime, human rights advocacy, and some recent appalling African history — and delivers it to us in a most enthralling manner. (I do not know about you, but I prefer my history and current events education spoon-fed to me via the humans — albeit fictional humans — who actually experienced these events.) Addison builds a lot of character development into “The Tears of Dark Water,” which renders the story both believable and compelling. Narrator Korey Jackson has a beautiful voice, and does an excellent job of distinguishing all of the diverse characters in this excellent audiobook. He was perfectly chosen to tell us this story. I recommend "The Tears of Dark Water" to anyone who does not mind a bit of education mixed in with their entertainment, and I plan to look for other audiobooks by this author and narrator.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Night School: A Jack Reacher Novel, Book 21

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 7 mins)
    • By Lee Child
    • Narrated By Dick Hill
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (7770)
    Performance
    (7076)
    Story
    (7047)

    It's 1996, and Reacher is still in the army. In the morning they give him a medal, and in the afternoon they send him back to school. That night he's off the grid. Out of sight, out of mind. Two other men are in the classroom - an FBI agent and a CIA analyst. Each is a first-rate operator, each is fresh off a big win, and each is wondering what the hell they are doing there. Then they find out: A jihadist sleeper cell in Hamburg, Germany, has received an unexpected visitor - a Saudi courier seeking safe haven while waiting to rendezvous with persons unknown.

    Phil says: "Disappointing"
    "I just spent a month with Jack Reacher!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    You simply cannot go wrong with Lee Child — This man can write. Every couple of years I go back and listen to the whole series all over again from the beginning, picking up the new episodes that have come along in the interim. Well, I just finished another go-around, and I still love Jack Reacher. Color me ready for the next one. If you have not listened to any of the previous Jack Reacher novels, you could probably enjoy starting with “Night School” — all of the novels in the Jack Reacher series stand alone fairly well, unlike most other thriller series — but I would recommend against it, because “Night School” is one of the series’ flashback novels. However, if you cannot afford to start at the beginning of the series, here is what you need to know about Jack Reacher:
    1) Jack Reacher is BIG.
    2) Jack Reacher is STRONG.
    3) Jack Reacher is SMART.
    4) Jack Reacher takes out the trash.
    You should also know that most of the novels in this series take place in contemporary time, now long after Reacher mustered out of the U.S. Army (in 1997), where he had served as a Military Police Officer. Nowadays, Reacher travels around the contiguous U.S. (so far, he has not made it to Alaska or Hawaii) — carrying nothing but his folding toothbrush — setting things right. He never knows where he is going to fetch up next; but, rest assured, wherever he lands, they need him. However, every so often — including “Night School” — we get to go back to Reacher’s Army days, to hear about how he got this way. In “Night School,” Reacher teams up with his totally awesome sergeant, Frances Neagley (I especially love the episodes that include her!), to deal with some bad guys in 1996 Germany. Men gotta love Jack Reacher, because he is the manliest man imaginable. Women gotta love this series, because Frances Neagley is even tougher than Reacher! (No misogyny here, ladies!) I want Lee Child to start a new series telling us all about Frances Neagley.
    Listening to the whole Jack Reacher series through again for about the fourth time, I noticed the gradual change in narrator Dick Hill’s voice. He definitely is starting to sound like an old man, now (which might, sadly, disqualify him for many future Jack Reacher narrations), but he still retains all his acting chops. I am having a little trouble understanding why other reviewers are expressing such dislike for his narration. True, he never did do accents well; but, he makes up for that with his acting skill, his range of voices, and his precision timing. I give “Night School” five stars, across the board.

    7 of 9 people found this review helpful
  • Easy Innocence: The Georgia Davis PI Series, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 54 mins)
    • By Libby Fischer Hellmann
    • Narrated By Beth Richmond
    Overall
    (21)
    Performance
    (20)
    Story
    (20)

    When pretty, smart Sara Long is found bludgeoned to death, it's easy to blame the man with the bat. But Georgia Davis - former cop and newly-minted PI - is hired to look into the incident at the behest of the accused's sister, and what she finds hints at a much different, much darker answer. It seems the privileged, preppy schoolgirls on Chicago's North Shore have learned just how much their innocence is worth to hot-under-the-collar businessmen.

    Snoodely says: "Corruption, Greed, and Prostitution …"
    "Corruption, Greed, and Prostitution …"
    Overall
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    Story

    … in affluent, upper-class suburbia! Yeah, “Easy Innocence” gets a bit gritty … and disturbing. Talk about innocence — I must be a complete ingenue! I had no idea that some of this stuff was going on … I mean, really — voluntary, organized, upper-class teenage prostitution and pandering? Golly … when I think about my teen years … well, let us just say that things must have changed since then. However, I have listened to enough of Ms Hellmann’s audiobooks now to know that she ALWAYS knows whereof she speaks. So I am taking her word for it. The plot of “Easy Innocence” goes well beyond the teen vice angle, though. Newly-minted P.I. Georgia Davis — recently dismissed from the Chicago Police Department for thinking outside the box — is investigating an — allegedly — “Open-and-Shut” murder case, when she stumbles upon some dodgy real-estate shenanigans that lead her into more dodgy political shenanigans that … guess what? … come around full-circle, tying right back into her murder investigation. As always, Ms Hellmann writes well, creating believable characters and plot complexities that will keep you riveted. Narrator Beth Richmond has a perfectly gorgeous voice, and acting chops, to boot! She has the repertoire of voices, accents, and timing to bring this audiobook to life. I recommend “Easy Innocence” to all mystery/thriller enthusiasts.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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