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eag

ratings
47
REVIEWS
10
FOLLOWING
3
FOLLOWERS
2
HELPFUL VOTES
3

  • Carpe Jugulum: Discworld, Book 23

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 48 mins)
    • By Terry Pratchett
    • Narrated By Nigel Planer
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (533)
    Performance
    (328)
    Story
    (331)

    Mightily Oats has not picked a good time to be a priest. He thought he'd come to the mountain kingdom of Lancre for a simple little religious ceremony. Now he's caught up in a war between vampires and witches, and he's not sure there is a right side. There are the witches - young Agnes, who is really in two minds about everything, Magrat, who is trying to combine witchcraft and nappies, Nanny Ogg, who is far too knowing . . . and Granny Weatherwax, who is big trouble.

    David says: "laugh til you understand"
    "Very enjoyable, just not the best of Discworld"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I like the witches, Nanny Ogg and Granny Weatherwax in particular, and so I enjoyed this book. It is not a standout Discworld title, but it's enjoyable, especially to fans who know a little bit already about these characters and the setting (in Lancre).

    Nigel Planer does a fine job with the reading, my problem is with the mixing more than anything. The sound quality changes at a couple of places, and neither is better than the other, but the transition is very jarring. It happens maybe 4 times, so certainly not every paragraph, but still...

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Just One Damned Thing After Another: The Chronicles of St Mary's, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By Jodi Taylor
    • Narrated By Zara Ramm
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (904)
    Performance
    (814)
    Story
    (816)

    Behind the seemingly innocuous façade of St Mary's, a different kind of historical research is taking place. They don't do 'time-travel' - they 'investigate major historical events in contemporary time'. Maintaining the appearance of harmless eccentrics is not always within their power - especially given their propensity for causing loud explosions when things get too quiet. Meet the disaster-magnets of St Mary's Institute of Historical Research as they ricochet around History.

    Sires says: "Action Adventure Time Travel Novel w/ Good Reader"
    "I ultimately returned this book..."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Yes, as other reviewers have mentioned, the narrator/protagonist is likeable, but she's not very complete. None of the characters are, which is again something that many reviewers have mentioned, that it's not character driven. And the writing is mediocre, with a lot of disjointed, badly done exposition that is often pretty heavy handed.

    Just one damned thing after another aptly describes this book, as it is very episodic, very much "and then this, and then this, and then this..." There is a tenuous story arc, but it feels like a TV series where there's a season long story arc that is briefly touched on in each episode, but each episode is nonetheless a standalone unit, until the season end when the final few episodes are devoted to that arc. The action in this book is a lot like that.

    The narrator would be better suited to something without different voices or moments of danger, something more even keel, because she sounds very monotonic throughout. It's usually difficult to tell who's talking, and there's no difference between her drinking a cup of tea and fighting for her life.

    I did give this a good chance, listening to over half, enough to see what the plot was driving at. But I found that, with a little under 4 hours left to listen, I just didn't care.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: A Signature Performance by Elijah Wood

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 12 mins)
    • By Mark Twain
    • Narrated By Elijah Wood
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2686)
    Performance
    (2159)
    Story
    (2143)

    A Signature Performance: Elijah Wood becomes the first narrator to bring a youthful voice and energy to the story, perhaps making it the closest interpretation to Twain’s original intent.

    james d. thomas says: "Worthy "signature" premiere"
    "Brilliant novel, brilliantly narrated"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The story, of course, is familiar to most, so I won't comment on that. Elijah Wood is an absolutely flawless narrator! There is a lot of dialect in this book, and it's important to character development, to creating nuance, time and place. In short, the dialects aren't trivial. Elijah Wood does a masterful job of rendering each character in their unique voice, of capturing the subtle difference that Mr. Twain himself identifies as important. This is a telling that merits repeated and regular listenings.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Agent to the Stars

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 49 mins)
    • By John Scalzi
    • Narrated By Wil Wheaton
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3628)
    Performance
    (3143)
    Story
    (3146)

    The space-faring Yherajk have come to Earth to meet us and to begin humanity's first interstellar friendship. There's just one problem: They're hideously ugly and they smell like rotting fish. So getting humanity's trust is a challenge. The Yherajk need someone who can help them close the deal. Enter Thomas Stein, who knows something about closing deals. He's one of Hollywood's hottest young agents.

    C. Paget says: "excellent"
    "It's not bad, I just didn't connect"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The story isn't bad, it's entertaining, but it's a little transparent, predictable. Wil Wheaton is a fine narrator who matches the book well, but there was nothing particularly outstanidng in his performance. It's not the best example of Scalzi's keen-eyed, sharp-witted modern sci-fi talent, nor of Wil Wheaton's gifts for ascerbic delivery. I found myself being entertained and listening to the end, but never really engaged or rivited or invested in this story or these characters.

    Not a bad listen, light and easy, but not exceptional.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Rithmatist

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 23 mins)
    • By Brandon Sanderson
    • Narrated By Michael Kramer
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1854)
    Performance
    (1698)
    Story
    (1709)

    More than anything, Joel wants to be a Rithmatist. Chosen by the Master in a mysterious inception ceremony, Rithmatists have the power to infuse life into two-dimensional figures known as Chalklings. Rithmatists are humanity’s only defense against the Wild Chalklings - merciless creatures that leave mangled corpses in their wake. Having nearly overrun the territory of Nebrask, the Wild Chalklings now threaten all of the American Isles.

    Brandon says: "Beware of the chalk!"
    "Entertaining, but..."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I know that most of the reviewers really enjoyed this book, and I found it enjoyable, but there was one important plot detail that I couldn't buy into. How would Joel, a 16-year-old non-specialist, have such a central role (or even unfettered access to the crime scene) in criminal investigation? For myself, it strained credibility, so that as much as I enjoyed the characters and the story, I just couldn't get past that. I've enjoyed other Sanderson books, and I will listen to others again, this just isn't something that I could connect to.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Maisie Dobbs

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 1 min)
    • By Jacqueline Winspear
    • Narrated By Rita Barrington
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1615)
    Performance
    (1025)
    Story
    (1023)

    Maisie Dobbs isn't just any young housemaid. Through her own natural intelligence - and the patronage of her benevolent employers - she works her way into college at Cambridge. After the War I and her service as a nurse, Maisie hangs out her shingle back at home: M. DOBBS, TRADE AND PERSONAL INVESTIGATIONS. But her very first assignment soon reveals a much deeper, darker web of secrets, which will force Maisie to revisit the horrors of the Great War and the love she left behind.

    A User says: "A delightful discovery"
    "Modestly paced, maybe it's perfect for commutes"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    A story that unfolds at its own pace can be really comfortable, something calming that you can look forward to. But at what point does "comfortable" become a bad thing? As I listen, I find that I like it well enough, and the heroine is charming and intelligent, and I like her, but I can only listen for about half an before I'm ready for a change. If I were a commuter, that'd be perfect, but my listening habits are not like that.

    The narrator is perfect, she really captures the time and the heroine in her performance. I think she's why I do enjoy it.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Modern Scholar: Rings, Swords, and Monsters: Exploring Fantasy Literature

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 50 mins)
    • By Michael D.C. Drout
    Overall
    (328)
    Performance
    (214)
    Story
    (212)

    In this course, the roots of fantasy and the works that have defined the genre are examined. Incisive analysis and a deft assessment of what makes these works so very special provides a deeper insight into beloved works and a better understanding of why fantasy is such a pervasive force in modern culture.

    Jefferson says: "An Informative, Stimulating, and Enjoyable Class"
    "Truly fascinating lecture (but some spoilers)"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The lecture format works particularly well for the ideas he's sharing, preserving a kind of conversational tone with a very conversational lecturer. He presents some fascinating background to modern fantasy and its links to oral tradition and the Victorian age; I had heard these ideas, but never heard them fleshed out quite as well as he does.

    One the strengths of this lecture is that he is a fan of fantasy literature, and he can talk about a series being heavily derivative of Tolkein and still say that he's read the series four times and enjoys it still. He also recognizes the magnitude and importance of Tolkein, appreciates his own enjoyment in Tolkein's work, but also reminds us that Tolkein didn't invent the genre, and there are others who have done some things better. Drout balances respect, recognition, criticism, and enjoyment really well.

    Listeners should be aware of some spoilers, as Prof. Drout goes through the plots of The Hobbit, Lord of the Rings, and the Silmarilion in some detail; all books in Ursula Le Guin's Earthsea series; Terry Brooks' Sword of Shannara series; Stephen Donaldson's Thomas Covenant series; Robert Holdstock's Mythago Woods series; Susan Cooper's Dark is Rising series; CS Lewis' Chronicles of Narnia; and TS White's the Once and Future King. He also goes through some Victorian tales in some detail, but these are things that most readers will be familiar with, like Peter Pan or Alice in Wonderland/Through the Lookinglass, or they're things that are pretty obscure, like the Princess and the Goblin or Waterbabies.

    That being said, his goal is not to remove our enjoyment as readers approaching a story for the first time. He doesn't tell the stories so that, if you read them yourself there will be no suspense, he just talks about how some of the themes that he's talking about, death and language and morality etc, are presented in these books. He really makes the point that fantasy works need to be considered as a whole when he talks about Harry Potter. The series had not been concluded when he gave this lecture, and so he says that it's not fair to consider the series until we know how it ends.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Tricked: The Iron Druid Chronicles, Book 4

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 41 mins)
    • By Kevin Hearne
    • Narrated By Luke Daniels
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (6047)
    Performance
    (5585)
    Story
    (5578)

    Druid Atticus O’Sullivan hasn’t stayed alive for more than two millennia without a fair bit of Celtic cunning. So when vengeful thunder gods come Norse by Southwest looking for payback, Atticus, with a little help from the Navajo trickster god Coyote, lets them think that they’ve chopped up his body in the Arizona desert. But the mischievous Coyote is not above a little sleight of paw, and Atticus soon finds that he’s been duped into battling bloodthirsty desert shape-shifters called skinwalkers.

    Nicholas says: "Hooked in an Instant"
    "This is my favorite in the series so far"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I like this book the best in the series so far. I really like Coyote and Frank as characters, and I appreciate that the belief system in question here is Navajo. The story is very much part of the continuum, picking up threads from the last book and laying a few down for the next. That being said, this story is more focused on one storyline than the first two and less fixated on one storyline than the third. Don't get me wrong, I enjoyed all three of the preceeding books, but I find this one the most balanced so far.

    Plus, it's got Oberon as his absolute most hilarious!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Hammered: The Iron Druid Chronicles, Book 3

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 40 mins)
    • By Kevin Hearne
    • Narrated By Luke Daniels
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (7322)
    Performance
    (6646)
    Story
    (6648)

    Thor, the Norse god of thunder, is worse than a blowhard and a bully - he’s ruined countless lives and killed scores of innocents. After centuries, Viking vampire Leif Helgarson is ready to get his vengeance, and he’s asked his friend Atticus O’Sullivan, the last of the Druids, to help take down this Norse nightmare.One survival strategy has worked for Atticus for more than two thousand years: stay away from the guy with the lightning bolts. But things are heating up in Atticus’s home base of Tempe, Arizona....

    Hallie says: "Love this series!"
    "Different from the first two, but still good"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book is structured a bit differently from the first two, in that the fight doesn't come to Atticus, he goes to the fight. I enjoyed this book, and there are some fantastic moments (Jesus and Atticus doing shots in the pub, for instance) but it's not my personal favorite. There's a little more depth and consequence and a little less Oberon that the first two.

    That being said, it is still a good lot of fun. I really enjoyed the fourth book in the series, Tricked, and there are things in that book that will make no sense without having read this book. And even though he does leave Arizona for a lot of the book, he still spends like 70% of the book in Tempe with all the regular characters. And of course his time in Tempe is never laid back and care free, so there's plenty of action throughout.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Hounded: The Iron Druid Chronicles, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 11 mins)
    • By Kevin Hearne
    • Narrated By Luke Daniels
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (10676)
    Performance
    (9539)
    Story
    (9515)

    Atticus O’Sullivan, last of the Druids, lives peacefully in Arizona, running an occult bookshop and shape-shifting in his spare time to hunt with his Irish wolfhound. His neighbors and customers think that this handsome, tattooed Irish dude is about twenty-one years old - when in actuality, he’s twenty-one centuries old. Not to mention: He draws his power from the earth, possesses a sharp wit, and wields an even sharper magical sword known as Fragarach, the Answerer. Unfortunately, a very angry Celtic god wants that sword, and he’s hounded Atticus for centuries....

    Chris says: "Finally, a modern day fantasy that really hits the"
    "I wish my dog could talk like Oberon!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is one of those really great, entertaining stories, not too heavy but enough meat to be engaging all the way through. My favorite stories are usually character driven, and this is no exception. Atticus is credible as a 2,100 year old Druid who has mastered the art of moving with the times, and his relationships with the witches, his attorneys (a vampire and a werewolf), the Irish Pantheon, and his fantastic dog keep this story moving right along.

    The dog, an Irish wolfhound named Oberon, needs a special mention, because he talks to Atticus, and as my sister describes him, he is a dog in a dog suit. He loves Atticus, he thinks werewolves are bitchy, he is a voracious sausage eater, and he dreams of French poodles. Best sidekick every!

    The story is never too graphic with either sex or violence, though both are part of it. There is swearing, but it's not every other word, and it's appropriate to the context. The author is still working, so there is one or two new stories every year, which is nice for a series. In short, this is a good choice for grown-up Neil Gaiman fans who want something with a little more levity.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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