You no longer follow DDTAN

You will no longer see updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can re-follow a user if you change your mind.

OK

You now follow DDTAN

You will receive updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can unfollow a user if you change your mind.

OK

DDTAN

“I'm on Aslan's side even if there isn't any Aslan to lead it. I'm going to live as like a Narnian as I can even if there isn't any Narnia."

ratings
58
REVIEWS
14
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
4
HELPFUL VOTES
29

  • Homeland: Legend of Drizzt: Dark Elf Trilogy, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 18 mins)
    • By R. A. Salvatore
    • Narrated By Victor Bevine
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1245)
    Performance
    (1147)
    Story
    (1165)

    This stunning new release of the classic R.A. Salvatore novel recounts the origins of Salvatore's signature dark elf character, Drizzt Do'Urden. This title kicks off The Legend of Drizzt series, which will showcase the classic dark elf novels in these new audiobook editions.

    Pi says: "Among the drow, all trust is foolish."
    "Fantasy at its Best!!!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you love best about Homeland?

    The world of Menzoberranzan, it is very creative and well written; the City of the Spiders is dark and brutal place that Drizzt must endure and not succumb to it's evil ways.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of Homeland?

    Drizzt rising up against Menzoberranzan evilness...and the sacrifice made at the end.


    What about Victor Bevine’s performance did you like?

    Victor Bevine did a wonderful job. He was a good choice to be narrator for this gruesome world.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    I thought the ending was pretty good in it's hinting of what is to come. After Drizzt's decision at the end, right after what Zaknafei had to do, I think the best is yet to come.


    Any additional comments?

    I have put of this series for awhile because of it sheer epicness. I knew if I started in on it, I might become hooked and would spend the next few months devoted to reading/listening to the rest of the series and doing not much else. I fear I am hooked. Yay.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Innocence: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 9 mins)
    • By Dean Koontz
    • Narrated By MacLeod Andrews
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (858)
    Performance
    (762)
    Story
    (778)

    He lives in solitude beneath the city, an exile from society, which will destroy him if he is ever seen. She dwells in seclusion, a fugitive from enemies who will do her harm if she is ever found. But the bond between them runs deeper than the tragedies that have scarred their lives. Something more than chance - and nothing less than destiny - has brought them together in a world whose hour of reckoning is fast approaching.

    Michael says: "Among Koontz’s Best Slow Interesting Books"
    "Started Strong but Lost It's Steam"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you like best about Innocence? What did you like least?

    The beginnings of the story was really intriguing to me, as it tells a story of a person living in solitude, for many years, beneath a metropolitan city with no human contact. He is an exile from society because his appearance is so abhorrent to the normal person, that when seen, drives them into a rage for his destruction. Dean Koontz's writing, once again, is so elegantly done, in its depiction of this grim world he has created, in which exist this exile of humanity, that it borders on poetic beauty. In fact, the whole story reads like a grim fairy tale.

    Now for the bad part. After such elegance, and work, in creating this dark setting, the author fails, in my opinion, to delve into the exploration of what the consequences are of a person existing in such a state. Instead, the author relies too much on superficial means as his escape out of the darkness he has put his protagonists in. Now, having read many Dean Koontz novels, one is to expect a certain amount of divinity sprinkled throughout his stories, but it's usually the characters in those stories that determine the outcome through their choices and actions; in "Innocence", I felt as though that was not the case.


    What was the most interesting aspect of this story? The least interesting?

    Once again, I felt the beginnings of the story was a beautifully created setup for, what I thought to be, some kind of precursor in the exploration of the human condition in its lowest levels, and that Dean Koontz was going prose something profound. Unfortunately, I felt like he fell short to deliver anything new. The whole story seemed to be blanketed by an aura of predestination and fate driven. So much so, that it took all suspense away from the story. I never felt once that the main characters were ever in any peril.


    What does MacLeod Andrews bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    I always think listening to audio, especially when the narrator is good, brings the story to a level of aliveness, that reading, sometimes, did not reach. Macleod Andrews did a good job bringing the story to life.


    Do you think Innocence needs a follow-up book? Why or why not?

    I don't believe so. I think Dean Koontz told what he wanted to tell in "Innocence". I can't imagine what more about this story that hasn't already been covered that would interest me enough to return to the world.


    Any additional comments?

    I had high hopes that this book might have been Dean Koontz's next ongoing series to replace the Odd Thomas series, which are my favorites. But now, I sincerely hope it was just a standalone, And that he has something else in the works that would rival the Odd Thomas series.

    3 of 6 people found this review helpful
  • The Legacy: Legend of Drizzt: Legacy of the Drow, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 51 mins)
    • By R. A. Salvatore
    • Narrated By Victor Bevine
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (313)
    Performance
    (296)
    Story
    (293)

    Having found a measure of peace among the dwarves in the reclaimed Mithral Hall, Drizzt begins to know contentment for perhaps the first time in his tumultuous life. But for a dark elf renegade from a city ruled by priestesses of a demon goddess, no peace can long last. It is Lolth herself, the dreaded Queen of the Demonweb Pits, who musters her followers to pour up from the black depths of the Underdark to reclaim for their goddess the one soul that had managed to elude her. The soul of Drizzt Do'Urden.

    derrick says: "Suspence action thriller"
    "The Adventure Continues"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you love best about The Legacy?

    The way R. A. Salvatore weaved the story together like a jigsaw puzzle, fitting each piece perfectly as he brought the story together.

    I was a little worried at first. I thought maybe Mr. Salvatore had lost his touch, as some of the characters weren't behaving like they normally do. But as I stated, like a jigsaw puzzle, with each piece connecting, things started to make more and more sense as Mr. Salvatore weaved his story together like a masterpiece painting.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of The Legacy?

    Wulfgar, Catie-brie and Bruenor's battle with the yochlol and the drow party from Menzoberranzan. It was a very powerful and emotional moment.


    Have you listened to any of Victor Bevine’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    I have listened to all of Victor Bevine's previous narration of this epic series. And once again, he does an amazing job. I can't imagine anyone else voicing Drizzt Do'Urden but him. I've gotten to the point where I hear his voice while reading the books in the series, when I am not listening to it that is.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    Yes, it was tough to stop listening. In fact, I had to buy the next book in the series right away after this one.


    Any additional comments?

    I thought I would have to wait for the next book in the series, like I had to wait for Audible to release this one after the Iced Dale Trilogy, which I admit was a tough wait. But to my surprise, Audible release all four books to this series on the same day. Celebration!!! Good job to Audible.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Soldiers Live: Chronicles of the Black Company, Book 10

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 29 mins)
    • By Glen Cook
    • Narrated By Marc Vietor
    Overall
    (141)
    Performance
    (107)
    Story
    (105)

    As Soldiers Live opens, Croaker is military dictator of all the Taglias, and no Black Company member has died in battle for four years. Croaker figures it can't last. He's right. For, of course, many of the Company's old adversaries are still around. Narayan Singh and his adopted daughter - actually the offspring of Croaker and the Lady - hope to bring about the apocalyptic Year of the Skulls. Other old enemies like Shadowcatcher, Longshadow, and Howler are also ready to do the Company harm.

    DDTAN says: "Finally, Croaker & The Black Company Returns!!!"
    "Finally, Croaker & The Black Company Returns!!!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you love best about Soldiers Live?

    The return of Croaker as annalist of The Black Company and also Marc Vietor as narrator.

    I soldiered through the last four books just to get to this one, because I knew The Black Company that I fell in love with in the first four books would finally return.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    It was Croaker by far. His annals/perspective of The Black Company, to me, is why I fell in love with the series in the first place.


    Which character – as performed by Marc Vietor – was your favorite?

    Marc Vietor, to me, is the best narrator of the series. He adds grittiness to The Black Company that the other narrators of the series could not match. His portrayal of Croaker is simply perfect.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    I found the phrase: "Soldiers live..." uttered throughout the book by Croaker, to be deeply profound. And it particularly moved me when Croaker uttered it for the last time: "Soldiers live and wonder why."


    Any additional comments?

    I now understand why Glen Cook wrote the last four books with different annalists. I think it was to give this well seasoned version of Croaker more flavor to contrast the younger Croaker from the earlier books.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Third Kingdom: Richard and Kahlan, Book 2

    • UNABRIDGED (17 hrs and 12 mins)
    • By Terry Goodkind
    • Narrated By Sam Tsoutsouvas
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (494)
    Performance
    (452)
    Story
    (460)

    "Three knives were buried up to their brass cross guards in the man's chest. Richard recognized the knife handles. All three were the style carried by the men of the First File. He looked from those blades that should have killed the big man, up to his face. That was when he realized the true horror of the situation, and the reason for the unbearable stench of death." Sequel to the #1 New York Times best seller The Omen Machine.

    Nimue says: "Good story, too much rambling"
    "Terry Goodkind Returns With Vengeance"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you love best about The Third Kingdom?

    What can I say, this is Terry Goodkind at his best. "The Third Kingdom" is finally the return of the Goodkind we've all been waiting for: character driven, compelling, action pack, emotional-joy-ride, suspense, all these factors will keep you reading/listening far into the late hours of the night.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of The Third Kingdom?

    The battle with the halfmen in The Third Kingdom during the escape. All I can say is "WOW!" Joyful, tear jerking, anger, despair, hope, hate, sadness, relief...'nuf said.


    What about Sam Tsoutsouvas’s performance did you like?

    Sam Tsoutsouvas does what he does best, he brings intensity and authority to voice of Richard Rahl. His narration, especially the battle scenes, had me on the edge of my seat as the intensity of them sent chills up my spine; I could feel the hot anger from the Sword of Truth, as though I was holding it, as Richard cut and cut and cut the enemies to pieces. lol.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    Yes. And there are so many questions left unanswered. I can't wait for the next book.


    Any additional comments?

    I got a little worried there towards the middle part of the book, it felt a little dragged out with the dialog between Richard and Sammy, but after that, wow, all hell broke loose. The intensity, which I didn't think was possible but Mr. Goodkind somehow did it, it reached another level.

    If this was any other book from a different author, I would have given the story five stars, but because Terry Goodkind has spoiled me with such books as Wizard's First Rule, Stone of Tears, and Faith of the Fallen, I hold Terry Goodkind to a higher standard, so I only gave this book four stars because, although it is very good, it's still not as good as his earlier books and pales in comparison to "Faith of the Fallen" which I consider is a masterpiece.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • The Servants of Twilight

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 46 mins)
    • By Dean Koontz
    • Narrated By Angela Dawe
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (161)
    Performance
    (145)
    Story
    (146)

    An ordinary parking lot in southern California. Christine Scavello and her six-year-old son are accosted by a strange old woman. "I know who you are," the woman snaps at the boy. "I know what you are." A scream, a threat - and then a grotesque act of violence. Suddenly Christine's pride and joy, her only son, is targeted by a group of religious fanatics. They've branded him the Antichrist. They want to kill him. And they are everywhere.

    Marg224 says: "Different spin"
    "Left Wanting"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you try another book from Dean Koontz and/or Angela Dawe?

    Yes, Dean Koontz writes great books, but this one: not so much. Angela Dawe did a pretty good job, especially voicing the boy, Joey.


    Would you ever listen to anything by Dean Koontz again?

    I have read/listen to numerous novels by Dean Koontz and have enjoyed most of them. Some of my favorites include: Odd Thomas, Hideaway, Intensity, Demon Seed, Frankenstein, Mr. Murder, Lightning and many more. Suffice to say, I have enjoyed pretty much most of his books for the most part. But I have to honestly admit I had to struggle to get through this one. The main characters lack depth, and Christine just started to annoy me more and more as the story went on. I mean the two, supposedly bad guys, if you can call them that: Grace Spivey and Kyle Barlow had more depth than the supposed good guys, if you can call them that, which are: Christine, Charlie, Joey, and the dog Chewbacca(or is it Brandy?) Lol, I grew to care more for the dog than I did for Christine and Charlie. Spoiler alert: The dog got bashed in the head twice and left for dead in a blizzard and still soldiered on to defend its master, never complaining once.

    Christine on the other hand just whined for the most part throughout the book, throwing tantrums here and there..."Oh life is so unfair, why me why me?! My mommy is so mean; she made me do my homework and work extra hard and she wants me to be humble. Me? No way, I am a supermodel, and I can strut if I want...Oh the injustice!!! Someone save me, preferably a handsome knight in shining armor."

    The only reason I kept going was because Mr. Koontz kept throwing in little teasers here and there of the boy possibly being the anti-Christ. Is he, or is he not? Keep reading/listening and you might find out. I don't want to spoil it for anyone, but the ending/answer left me wanting to pull my hair out in frustration. This book is like listening to a debate between a theist and an atheist, waiting for one of them to knock it out the park and prove once and for all who is right...but off course you always leave feeling disappointed, with uncertainly still firmly chained upon you, with questions left unanswered.


    Which scene was your favorite?

    Can't think of one in particular. All the scenes that started to developed, that could have developed into memorable scenes all fell short. They were all teasers, answering nothing, leaving the reader unsatisfied.


    Do you think The Servants of Twilight needs a follow-up book? Why or why not?

    Maybe. But it has to have a better ending. I don't want to waste my time again.


    Any additional comments?

    Dean Koontz always has something profound to say in all his books via his characters. But in this one, there was none, or if there was, it was beyond me. Unless his goal was to leave me frustrated and unsatisfied. In that, he did a superb job.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Best Served Cold

    • UNABRIDGED (27 hrs and 25 mins)
    • By Joe Abercrombie
    • Narrated By Michael Page
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1123)
    Performance
    (753)
    Story
    (769)

    It's springtime in Styria. And that means war. There have been nineteen years of blood. The ruthless Grand Duke Orso is locked in a vicious struggle with the squabbling League of Eight, and between them they have bled the land white. While armies march, heads roll, and cities burn, behind the scenes bankers, priests, and older, darker powers play a deadly game to choose who will be king.

    Lore says: "Solid, but not as good as the First Law trilogy."
    "Spank Me Some More, I Must Really Like It!!!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    If you could sum up Best Served Cold in three words, what would they be?

    Unwholesome gloomy fun.


    What did you like best about this story?

    This book is like driving by a horrid car crash. You know you shouldn't look, but you look anyways because of some deep morbid fascination that hypnotizes. That's what this book is like, even though you know you shouldn't turn the page, or in this case, to stop listening, but you end up listening/reading on anyways. Until, before you know it, you're at the bitter end and your like: "Yuck!!!" And then you laugh to prevent yourself from crying at the brutal and meaningless world. You know that saying that goes: "No good deed goes unpunished", well the author here seems to have taken that saying to heart. Indeed, whenever someone did something remotely good in this book, you started to expect hell would soon follow and exact punishment for such a righteous act. Mr. Abercrombie doesn't hold back, he punches you and punches you until your numbed all over, until you're as miserable as the characters are. LOL. Spank me some more, I must really like it. This book is a masterpiece on describing the human condition at it's lowest and most deplorable levels. I found myself cheering and almost weeping whenever even the smallest act of decency is displayed, but it's short lived at best, for such acts are quickly swept away by the onslaught of the brutally meaningless existence of the all the characters in this world. Which sadly, a lot of times, reflects our world.


    Would you listen to another book narrated by Michael Page?

    Yes I would. Normally I would give Michael Page a high rating because he did a good job, but I have been spoiled by Steven Pacey whom narrated the previous books by Abercrombie, so my rating of Michael Page is a bit tainted by extremely high expectations. It also didn't help that the sound quality was subpar to what I am use to by Audible. I tried listening to different formats but they all had this echoing sound to it, like the audio was EQ/set on: "Hall" or something, like listening to sounds in a cavern.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    I have to be honest and say this book sickened me, but entertained me all at the same time. I am not sure what this means yet, but it's somewhat frightening, like watching a scary movie and coming out saying, why did I just do that, but then can't wait to go watch another scary movie to subject myself to even more torment.


    Any additional comments?

    Once again, the sound quality was not up to the standards that I have become accustomed to with audiobooks from Audible.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Blade Itself: The First Law: Book One

    • UNABRIDGED (22 hrs and 20 mins)
    • By Joe Abercrombie
    • Narrated By Steven Pacey
    Overall
    (3635)
    Performance
    (2584)
    Story
    (2599)

    Inquisitor Glokta, a crippled and bitter relic of the last war, former fencing champion turned torturer, is trapped in a twisted and broken body - not that he allows it to distract him from his daily routine of torturing smugglers.Nobleman, dashing officer and would-be fencing champion Captain Jezal dan Luthar is living a life of ease by cheating his friends at cards. Vain and shallow, the biggest blot on his horizon is having to get out of bed in the morning to train with obsessive and boring old men.

    Jefferson says: "Violent, Ironic, and Absorbing Epic Fantasy Noir"
    "Bloody Fantastic Fun"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you consider the audio edition of The Blade Itself to be better than the print version?

    Yes, Steven Pacey's performance brought the characters to life for me in a way that the printed version could not.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    The Bloody Nine off course. His venture from wild barbarian of the North, to civilization, the heart of the Union itself, was a joy to follow. His dry humor, witty perspective of the world, and grim persona was well done. He is a reluctant hero, but seems to do the right thing when he is face with the choice, although he is far from perfect. Come on, you have to be realistic about these things. :)


    Have you listened to any of Steven Pacey’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    I have not.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    Yes, I kept listening late into the night when I should have been asleep for work the next day.


    Any additional comments?

    I can't say enough good things about Steven Pacey's performance. There are bad, average, good, and excellent narrators, and then there is Steven Pacey. There are not enough stars I can give that would sufficiently describe how good Steven Pacey's performance was for this book. Great Job!

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Exile: Legend of Drizzt: Dark Elf Trilogy, Book 2

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 12 mins)
    • By R. A. Salvatore
    • Narrated By Victor Bevine
    Overall
    (789)
    Performance
    (727)
    Story
    (740)

    Hostile in ways that a surface-dweller could never know, the tunnel-mazes of the Underdark challenge all who tread there. Among these souls are Drizzt Do'Urden and his magical cat, Guenhwyvar. Exiled from his drow homeland, Drizzt must fight for a new home in the boundless labyrinth. Meanwhile, he must watch for signs of pursuit - for the dark elves are not a forgiving race.

    Patrice says: "Excellent as Always"
    "Drizzt Do'Urden, a Light in the Underdark"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you love best about Exile?

    Drizzt and Belwar's exploration and journey through the Underdark.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    I was introduced to Drizzt Do'Urden and got to know him a little bit in "Homeland", but it's in "Exile" that I became emotionally invested in Drizzt and his moral integrity. His willingness to sacrifice to help his friends and, sometimes, even strangers is an example of his heroic nature. And that even though he dwells in the depths of, seemingly, a hell of world in Menzoberranzan, in the Underdark, he never gives in to the darkness but instead holds true to his standards and ideals.


    Which character – as performed by Victor Bevine – was your favorite?

    Drizzt Do'Urden of course. But I also like his protrayal of Belwar Dissengulp, he really brought that character to life for me.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    Yes, it was hard to stop because I wanted to know what happen next.


    Any additional comments?

    "Homeland" started in a measured pace as we were introduce to the world of Menzoberranzan and gradually picked up with the emergence of Drizzt.

    In "Exile", there was no need for conservativeness. The action starts of with a bang and bangs you to the end.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • 77 Shadow Street

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 9 mins)
    • By Dean Koontz
    • Narrated By Peter Berkrot
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (699)
    Performance
    (609)
    Story
    (606)

    Enter the world of the Pendleton: The original owner became a recluse - and was rumored to be more than half mad - after his wife and two children were kidnapped in 1896 and never found. The second owner suffered a worse tragedy in 1935, when his house manager murdered him, his family, and the entire live-in staff.... Craftsmen and laborers working on renovations disappear or go mad.... For years, the Pendleton is a happy place, until a bad turn comes again.... Voices in unknown languages are heard in deserted rooms....

    Carol says: "Disappointing, a total let-down."
    "OK, but Not Dean Koontz's Best"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Is there anything you would change about this book?

    There was to many characters. It felt like most of the book was focus on introducing characters, but didn't really focus much on any of them. Thus, I didn't feel any emotional attachment to any of them and didn't have any sense of peril or emotions for them when they were endangered.


    What was your reaction to the ending? (No spoilers please!)

    It was to simple and felt rushed. It did not meet my expections of the grandeur of the events taking place in the Pendleton that lead up to the end.


    Which scene was your favorite?

    Winny and Iris hiding from one of those creapy monster things. And then Winny ultimately deciding he had to fight it to protect Iris. To me, Winny and Iris saved this book.


    Do you think 77 Shadow Street needs a follow-up book? Why or why not?

    No...I did not become invested in any of the characters and have no desire to revisit them.


    Any additional comments?

    I think Dean Koontz should write more about Crispin and his dog Harley from his Novella: "Moonlit Mild". One of the main reasons why I picked up 77 Shadow St was in the hopes that the story somehow interweave with "Moonlit Mild", since they are both in the same world, and brought Crispin and Harly back again, and I was greatly disapointed that 77 Shadows St had nothing to do with Moonlit Mind.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

CANCEL

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.