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Darryl

Cedar Rapids, IA, United States | Member Since 2005

418
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 230 reviews
  • 935 ratings
  • 1 titles in library
  • 112 purchased in 2014
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20

  • Summer Crossing: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (3 hrs and 27 mins)
    • By Truman Capote
    • Narrated By Cassandra Campbell
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (36)
    Performance
    (8)
    Story
    (9)

    In late 2004, a trove of Truman Capote's abandoned papers went up for auction at Sotheby's. Included in the lot was the handwritten manuscript of Summer Crossing, a novel Capote began writing in 1943, and continued to tinker with on and off for a decade. Since the time of his death in 1984, Capote scholars and biographers had long believed this manuscript lost, never to be recovered. They were wrong.

    Marjorie says: "Summer doldrums"
    "quality writing"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    i would have to say Capote is a nice writer. though this is perhaps not his top form, it was very good and there is a quality to his writing that i can't quite define other than to say a smoothness. somewhat a coming of age type story i guess, or young love or rebellion. and i'm always interested to see what items were current culturally at the time, little things you don't think about. I would have to say that, of course it's a completely different type of "novel", but In Cold Blood was a masterpiece and totally riveting. i would go on to more Capote.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Redshirts: A Novel with Three Codas

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 41 mins)
    • By John Scalzi
    • Narrated By Wil Wheaton
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (5420)
    Performance
    (5052)
    Story
    (5048)

    Ensign Andrew Dahl has just been assigned to the Universal Union Capital Ship Intrepid, flagship of the Universal Union since the year 2456. Life couldn’t be better…until Andrew begins to pick up on the facts that (1) every Away Mission involves some kind of lethal confrontation with alien forces; (2) the ship’s captain, its chief science officer, and the handsome Lieutenant Kerensky always survive these confrontations; and (3) at least one low-ranked crew member is, sadly, always killed.

    Ken says: "It's all about the codas"
    "the good, the bad, the poor, and the ugly"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    this novel is like a spinning top that slowly winds down. great fun crazy action, then increasingly slow tedious slide toward a cliche ending coda to try to give it "gravitas". had I turned it off before the codas, i'd still be smiling.

    1st the Good: let me say that I thoroughly enjoyed the opening 1/3-half of the novel, the actual novel, not the Codas. I would even go so far as to say that I liked the whole thing up to about the 5:30 mark, which is, give or take, the end of the actual novel. The premise is very funny: the redshirt extra characters of a Star Trek-ian show who get killed willy-nilly as part of the away team, figure out that they are just that, expendable characters and thus try to survive long enough to figure out how to stay alive. The spoofing of Trek cliché’s is well done and funny and has been noted by every fan of the show. Then we get into some alternate reality stuff that still works fine towards explaining and resolving the issue.

    2nd the Bad: I’m sorry but all of the Codas are a waste. Not only do they detract from the actual humorous enjoyment of the Redshirt story, but they are by turns irritating, not as funny as Scalzi thinks they are, boring, and predictable. He thinks that this meta-fictional addendum/continuation raises the literary level of the novel into higher planes. Sorry. Not only has it been done before in various guises, some of which he mentions, some he doesn’t (Hubbard’s Typewriter in the Sky, the only good thing he ever did; John Candy’s Delirious; and many others) but for a professional job try the master, Vladimir Nabokov’s Invitation and/or Bend Sinister and others.

    3rd the Poor: I’m sorry but writing 101 should stipulate “do not give major characters names that are so similar they confuse the reader as to who is who”, which itself is compounded by Will Wheaton’s uniform narration which differentiates no voices, not even female/male and thus Dahl & Duvall are easily mixed up, except for when…

    4th The Ugly: incessant use of the attribution of dialogue in the “he said, she said, he said, she said"…ad infinitum…ad nauseum. This is plain and simple, UGLY writing . This smacks of laziness; of a lack of talent; of a poor editor; of a lack of respect for the reader.

    So, all in all, I’d say that the first 5 & ½ hours are fun for Trek fans and the satire and for the premise itself, and then shut it off. 2 friends hit the kill switch at that point, one because the story was over, and the other who tried a little of the 1st coda and called it quits. I, unfortunately, kept going and it spoiled my enjoyment of the actual novel.

    So I'd give the actual Redshirt novel 4 stars for being fun, I give the Codas 1 star though I'm sure Scalzi thinks they're precious, and I give Wheaton 2 stars as he lacks any type of vocal alterations for characters. I know some out there are going to say I'm being harsh, but there are excellent narrators out there, (Jim Dale who did Harry Potter has an amazing array of voices, Frank Muller's Moby is great, John Lee is very good, and recently the Bergmann Stand on Zanzibar was excellent) and Wheaton is at least at this point, not one of them.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • QB VII

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By Leon Uris
    • Narrated By John Lee
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (20)
    Performance
    (18)
    Story
    (19)

    In Queen's Bench Courtroom Number Seven, famous author Abraham Cady stands trial. In his book The Holocaust - born of the terrible revelation that the Jadwiga Concentration camp was the site of his family's extermination - Cady shook the consciousness of the human race. He also named eminent surgeon Sir Adam Kelno as one of Jadwiga's most sadistic inmate/doctors. Kelno has denied this and brought furious charges. Now unfolds Leon Uris' riveting courtroom drama - one of the great fictional trials of the century.

    Jean says: "Based on true story"
    "good yet a bit heavy handed courtroom drama"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Long ago I read a bunch of the early Uris and liked them very much and this was a favorite. While it is still good, and apparently based upon an actual libel suit against Uris concerning Exodus, it could do with some polishing.

    It is well researched, as all Uris were supposed to be, and detailed and sets up the opposing sides well with perhaps too lengthy biographical stories. But I'm not a fan of the Cady character, partially due to his being a rather overblown masculine chest thumper type, but also and unfairly because the voice for him by Lee reminds me too much of Matthew McConaughey and his slow southern drawl which I do not care for. Do not misunderstand me, I think Lee is an excellent narrator 99% of the time, it's just that this voice got on my nerves.

    Aside from that I don't have a problem with characters who are flawed or are unlikeable, but too many times i felt like Uris needed some more subtlety and less of Cady's speechifying which really went overboard. (Perhaps this was Uris way of spilling his feelings over his trial and while it is understandable, it is unfortunate that it gets in the way so often.) His blatant womanizing and near mysogyny was a bit much also.

    The story has enough power in it's own right without beating us over the head with moralizing. & with a couple of trims a little more suspense could have been easily obtained, but there were some predictable elements.

    I would be curious to revisit some other Uris for the historical drama and to see if they hold up. I kept thinking of Frederick Forsyth for some reason and how he might have done this, for there is an element to the style or content that's somehow similar, but early Forsyth was rather stripped down prose and I think this would have benefitted from that tightening up.

    Still very good and the courtroom stuff is excellent, but there is a little too much at the end, a tacked on feeling to the last chapter, and it dilutes what could have been a powerful ending.

    I remember Presumed Innocent and Anatomy of a Murder being exceptional courtroom dramas and at one time I thought QBVII was of their caliber, but perhaps not. Then again, it is hard to revisit any mystery or courtroom drama when you already know the surprise witness or testimony and the verdict and not feel a little let down. So I guess I'd say give it a try for the story despite some flaws.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • BUtterfield 8

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 7 mins)
    • By John O'Hara, Lorin Stein (introduction)
    • Narrated By Gretchen Mol
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    A masterpiece of American fiction and a best seller upon its publication in 1935, BUtterfield 8 lays bare with brash honesty the unspoken and often shocking truths that lurked beneath the surface of a society still reeling from the effects of the Great Depression. One Sunday morning, Gloria wakes up in a stranger's apartment with nothing but a torn evening dress, stockings, and panties. When she steals a fur coat from the wardrobe to wear home, she unleashes a series of events that can only end in tragedy.

    Darryl says: "a little drab for me"
    "a little drab for me"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    As much as I liked Appointment in Samarra, I was let down by this. Overall I tired of the pointless drunken existence of these people.

    On the other hand, I do think that it gives a sense of the times; the "lost generation"; the rote daily existence; those who don't take responsibility for their actions, or at least seek easy solutions; the constant alcoholism; double standards; aimlessness.

    I guess I felt it was rather directionless compared to other "classics" of the period, even his own Samarra. The style is very Hemingway-esque for the most part.

    Elements made me think of, and wish for the audio of, P.J. Wolfson's Three of a Kind (a great noir of the Cain Postman variety) but particularly for Is My Flesh of Brass?, (1934) a great novel concerning unscrupulous doctors and abortion that predates by a year Butterfield (1935).

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Under the Skin

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 15 mins)
    • By Michel Faber
    • Narrated By Fiona Hardingham
    Overall
    (99)
    Performance
    (92)
    Story
    (91)

    A “fascinating psychological thriller” (Baltimore Sun), this entrancing novel introduces Isserley, a female driver who scouts the Scottish Highlands for male hitchhikers with big muscles. She herself is tiny—like a kid peering up over the steering wheel. Scarred and awkward, yet strangely erotic and threatening, Isserley listens to her passengers as they open up to her, revealing clues about who might miss them should they disappear—and then she strikes. What happens to her victims next is only part of a terrifying reality.

    Tracy says: "weird & creepy, but interesting!"
    "stays with you, then get the film"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    novel: I very much like this one. It has some odd SF/horror elements that made me think of Well's Time Machine, not the time element, but the Morlocks and the Eloi. And then there is a little bit of the Man Who Fell to Earth identity confusion/struggle on the alien's behalf.

    I don't want to give too much away, but there is a "huntress" looking for men. I thought there'd be a little more of the Piers Anthony Firefly idea but it's not really that at all. I do think a couple of the hunt episodes maybe run long, but not horribly. There is a rather horrific scene involving the men but in general I think the ideas are more horrible than any particular scenes. And in an odd way you come to identify with the girl. Much can be said about the ideas of body image and sexual attraction/predation.

    film: If you are interested and want to see a very cool interpretation of this check out the film that just got released on disc/itunes. Artsy, impressionistic, very Kubrick-ian use of image, music, cinematography, and no easy answers and explanations. It is not a strict filming of the novel though but I thought it was fascinating.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Nightwings

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 58 mins)
    • By Robert Silverberg
    • Narrated By Stefan Rudnicki
    Overall
    (3)
    Performance
    (3)
    Story
    (3)

    For 1,000 years, mankind has lived under the threat of invasion from an alien race. After the oceans rose and the continents were reshaped, people divided into guilds - Musicians, Scribes, Merchants, Clowns, and more. The Watchers wander the Earth, scouring the skies for signs of enemies from the stars. But during one Watcher's journey to the ancient city of Roum with his companion, a Flier named Avluela, a moment of distraction allows the invaders to advance. When the Watcher finally sounds the alarm, it's too late: the star people are poised to conquer all.

    Richard L. Rubin says: "HUGO AWARD WINNING NOVELLA AND TWO SEQUELS!"
    "good not great "apocalyptic""
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    in general i like Silverberg but i think this one fizzles at the end. a friend listened at same time and he felt basically the same as i do on all these points.

    part one is the best section and contains the most interesting characters and aspects. it is the original short story/novella that won a hugo award and that is it's strength: it is an open-ended yet at least unified piece. there in lies the trouble, as he decided to continue or expand the story into a novel.

    part 2 suffers from a slow down of the narrative and moves from the Rome(Roum) of part 1 into a journey to Paris(Perris) and while it has some interesting things, it really suffers from the absence of Avluela the Nightwing of the title, one of the more interesting characters.

    Part 3 heads to Jerusalem(Jorslem) and picks up again with the help of the reappearance of Avluela but the novel ends with some interesting ideas that go undeveloped. The regeneration back to youth is good but I would have liked for that bit to come sooner and get worked with.

    I like a lot of the stuff within the story, the guild structure of the society, the apocalyptic setting, the alien threat, the characters (especially in the first 1/3).

    in fact there is a lot I like about this and if it had a re-worked middle, and a few things developed more at the end, it would have been very good. the main character Tomis, goes through some good development.

    it reminded me of Canticle for Liebowitz, mainly for the setting that i at least envisioned, though it is very different and not of that caliber.

    troublesome middle hinders this one i think.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Liberty

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 17 mins)
    • By Garrison Keillor
    • Narrated By Garrison Keillor
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (268)
    Performance
    (126)
    Story
    (128)

    Lake Wobegon is in a frenzy of preparations for the Fourth of July. The town is dizzy with anticipation - until they hear of Clint's ambition to run for Congress. They know about his episodes with vodka sours, his rocky marriage, and his friendship with the 24-year-old who dresses up as the Statue of Liberty for the parade and may be buck naked beneath her robes. In Keillor's words, "It is Lake Wobegon as you imagined it - good loving people who drive each other crazy."

    Christopher says: "Great for a long country drive."
    "funny Lake Wobegon story"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    in all honesty i am not a Keillor "fan" as his drawling voice gets on my nerves and so I never got into the show.

    however, I tried this on a friends recommendation who is a fan of the book and GK in general and my trepidation over his voice didn't come into play. I thought he read this very well and the story itself was very funny at times. as I said, i do not listen to the show, so there may be characters and such that will be familiar to fans, i do not know, but it didn't matter to the story for me.

    I enjoyed the odd small town characters and situations, though I think he missed a couple of opportunities for some real wacky incidents in the parade that would have been totally in keeping with the story. but i had fun with it, it did what it was supposed to and i may try another of the Wobegon stories.

    GK does have a great funny short baseball story in the funny shorts collection that he also narrates, so maybe he's better, at least for me, in this format as opposed to the slow paced radio show. though i think his readings of poetry with billy collins is hit and miss.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Guy Noir and the Straight Skinny

    • UNABRIDGED (4 hrs and 8 mins)
    • By Garrison Keillor
    • Narrated By Garrison Keillor, Tim Russell, Sue Scott
    Overall
    (25)
    Performance
    (21)
    Story
    (21)

    On the 12th floor of the Acme Building, on a cold February day in St. Paul, Guy Noir looks down the barrel of a loaded revolver in the hands of geezer gangster Joey Roast Beef, who is demanding to hear what lucrative scheme Guy is cooking up with stripper-turned-women's-studies-professor Naomi Fallopian. Everyone wants to know, and Guy faces them one by one, as he and Naomi pursue a dream of earning gazillions by selling a surefire method of dramatic weight loss.

    Darryl says: "funny noir spoof"
    "funny noir spoof"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    while I generally tire of Keillor's voice rather quickly, this is more of a radio play, i suppose taken from the Prairie Home broadcasts, and so has sound effects and several other players.

    I thought it was very funny at times, and enjoyed it, though I do think that it goes on just a little too long, which sounds odd given that it is only a few hours long, but I think in many instances certain stories that rely on a joke premise or odd setup, need to get to the "punchline" quickly as length only dilutes the premise and drains away the fun in favor of continuing for another episode, much like TV shows that go on too long after the initial creative surge runs out.

    but, in general i had fun with the first 2/3 for sure.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Martian Crown Jewels

    • UNABRIDGED (44 mins)
    • By Poul Anderson
    • Narrated By John W. Michaels
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    Sherlock Holmes on Mars? When the Martian Crown Jewels disappear, and the universe is in the brink of an interstellar incident, who else better to call then the universally famous three-eyed sleuth Syaloch to solve the crime.

    Darryl says: "ok sherlock pastiche"
    "ok sherlock pastiche"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    a lot of authors can't help trying a Sherlock type story and this is one. As it goes, it is ok, and i think it is considered one of the "classic" SF pastiches, but it may be a little more for devout fans of Sherlock and Poul Anderson.

    I do think that it is the type of story that benefits from a more light hearted, and quicker paced narration. This narrator is not very good at all and probably hinders (at least my) enjoyment of the tale.

    It appears this Mike Vendetti has formed his own narrative/audio company and is going through stories that may be in public domain and/or not optioned by bigger companies like Audible etc yet, and that is not necessarily a good thing as he is not a good narrator nor is this guy, in fact they may be same person, their slow ponderous style is so similar.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Roller Coaster

    • UNABRIDGED (17 mins)
    • By Alfred Bester
    • Narrated By John W. Michaels
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    This tale by Alfred Bester has a strong thread of plausibility running through it. Just enough conviction, if in fact, to wake up in the middle of the night with a feeling that someone stole the blankets.

    Darryl says: "Love Bester"
    "Love Bester"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I only encourage you to get this short piece which made me think of the robert Bloch Toy for Juliette story because I want to get Audible to do the classic Bester novels, Demolished Man, and Stars, My Destination.

    By itself it is ok, and I in general don't like this one short piece for $4 type crap that's happening all the time now, (though I wish I could have picked and chose 1 at a time of Ellison and saved $ and time getting 3-4 good ones instead of hours of his drek).

    Anyway, as I say, I only got it to show them an interest in Bester and hope for the 2 great ones.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Proteus Operation

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 13 mins)
    • By James P. Hogan
    • Narrated By Paul Christy
    Overall
    (16)
    Performance
    (15)
    Story
    (15)

    When malcontents from a utopian 21st century use their time gate to transform Hitler into an invincible conqueror, a band of freedom-fighting Americans launches the Proteus project and builds a second time gate.

    Michael says: "Where we're going, McFly, we WILL need roads!"
    "time travel that doesn't work"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I like the idea, and I like elements of the story, but it is so poorly written that I had trouble with it. Especially after having just come from To Say Nothing of the Dog, which is so well written.

    And the narrator doesn't do well, mispronouncing words, altering his pronunciation of the same word later; not doing voices well at all, not even trying to give Churchill a distinct voice and yet oddly enough trying to do it for Einstein.

    Aside from that, I didn't believe in the world at all. & here's why. If you compare To Say Nothing wherein the research into the period is so well done but also the characters are living in that world...But in this one, there are times when the description feels like, "oh, yeah, I need to describe that time period, so let me list elements in this picture I'm looking at". The characters don't really interact with the environment in a way that makes you believe in it.

    I really was hoping it would be good with the SF & Time Travel & WWII. Though I did like the multiple worlds/quantum physics aspect very much, but just can't recommend it; not when there is a superior Time Travel with the Willis To Say Nothing....

    I do think it would make an interesting film or mini series with good recreations of the time period etc. And there are a couple of ideas near the end which almost redeem it. With revision and a better narrator it could be good.

    I'm being a little hard on it, and I admit that it suffered mightily due to listening right after To Say Nothing which had pitch perfect narration also. Basically Willis does everything right, and Hogan misses on so many points.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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