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Hakan

OSLONorway

10
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 1 reviews
  • 18 ratings
  • 50 titles in library
  • 0 purchased in 2014
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  • The Dip

    • UNABRIDGED (1 hr and 33 mins)
    • By Seth Godin
    • Narrated By Seth Godin
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (664)
    Performance
    (272)
    Story
    (276)

    Every new project (or job, or hobby, or company) starts out exciting and fun. Then it gets harder and less fun, until it hits a low point: really hard, and not much fun at all. And then you find yourself asking if the goal is even worth the hassle. Maybe you're in a Dip: a temporary setback that you will overcome if you keep pushing. But maybe it's really a Cul-de-Sac, which will never get better, no matter how hard you try.

    Andrew says: "Seth Should Have Quit"
    "Touches to quitting, when to quit - just touches"
    Overall

    As an opening act, the book tries to convince you that you should aim to be best in the world. "If you are not sold on being the best in the world, you probably don't need the rest of what I am about to tell you.", author says around 12th minute, and this sentence was nerving. I am not interested in being sold on being the best in the world! I am interested in making smart decisions about quitting.

    The book keeps going on the being-the-best idea for quite a while. Making smart decisions about when to quit and when to persevere has no what-so-ever correlation with being the best. Therefore in my opinion the book does not deliver what its title implies (will teach you when to quit or stick).

    Examples I can remember either are too obvious: e.g. deciding to learn snowboarding,
    a. you do the brave thing, start and go through the tough parts, and complete
    b. you do the mature thing, evaluate and decide it is not something you want to do
    c. you decide to learn, spent a lot of money and time, and quit, which is the stupid thing to do.

    Or too vague: if you do not see light at the end of the tunnel, then maybe it is time to quit?

    Or logically faulty: Any of the 42000 graduates can become the best, but they did not, because they quit because of one reason or another.

    The author puts these in a much more attractive way than I did (and if you read all #1556# characters of my review, then, since you persevere as I do, you might still find the book worthy. After all, I am not saying it is totally worthless. Just don't have high hopes!)

    10 of 12 people found this review helpful

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