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John

New Orleans, LA, United States | Member Since 2014

8
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 6 reviews
  • 251 ratings
  • 0 titles in library
  • 8 purchased in 2015
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  • When Money Dies: The Nightmare of Deficit Spending, Devaluation, and Hyperinflation in Weimar, Germany

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs)
    • By Adam Fergusson
    • Narrated By Antony Ferguson
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (109)
    Performance
    (75)
    Story
    (74)

    When Money Dies is the classic history of what happens when a nations currency depreciates beyond recovery. In 1923, with its currency effectively worthless (the exchange rate in December of that year was one dollar to 4,200,000,000,000 marks), the German republic was all but reduced to a barter economy. Expensive cigars, artworks, and jewels were routinely exchanged for staples such as bread; a cinema ticket could be bought for a lump of coal; and a bottle of paraffin for a silk shirt....

    Mitch says: "Useless details, missing the big points"
    "Disappointed"
    Overall

    This book did have its interesting tidbits and the narrator is fine, so I didn't feel I wasted a credit or anything. But due to this being such a fascinating subject, I was rather disappointed. the writer wrote it like a boring history text and left me with more question then he answered. I hope I can find other books on this subject.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Autopilot: The Art & Science of Doing Nothing

    • UNABRIDGED (3 hrs and 51 mins)
    • By Andrew Smart
    • Narrated By Kevin Free
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (240)
    Performance
    (214)
    Story
    (214)

    Andrew Smart wants you to sit and do nothing much more often - and he has the science to explain why. At every turn we’re pushed to do more, faster, and more efficiently: That drumbeat resounds throughout our wage-slave society. Multitasking is not only a virtue, it’s a necessity. But Andrew Smart argues that slackers may have the last laugh. The latest neuroscience shows that the “culture of effectiveness” is not only ineffective, it can be harmful to your well-being.

    Oliver says: "One of the best books this year"
    "Pure Drivel"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    I got this from Audible's daily deal, and my word... I want my $2 back. the book made me feel abysmal and greatly put off. The abject vacuity of his reasoning, the question begging, leaps of logic, the ludicrous and adolescent diatribe against capitalism, the Protestant work-ethic, business, etc... his childish praise of laziness--it was... it was all more than I could stomach (and sadly I was already feeling sick before starting the book).

    If only the author followed his own advice and never under went the laborious and toilsome employment of writing this book and finding a publisher who would mass produce his drivel. Or better yet, If only he was acquainted with the profundity of his ideas earlier in life, and with idealistic fervor dropped out of school and immediately joined the cream of society; those with the healthiest and more vigorous brains, who sit doing nothing all day under the overpass. If it was during times of idleness, that the author's "creativity" and "insights" were sparked for this pathetic excuse for a book, then, my word.... we get to see the fruit of a slothful mind that has sunk a wee too deep into the mire of idiocy. Gee... this book is so ridiculous, bla... I wish I could give it minus 5 stars.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • When the Church Was Young: Voices of the Early Fathers

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 8 mins)
    • By Marcellino D'Ambrosio
    • Narrated By Marcellino D'Ambrosio
    Overall
    (35)
    Performance
    (34)
    Story
    (32)

    Marcellino D'Ambrosio dusts off what might have been just dry theology to bring you the exciting stories of great heroes such as Ambrose, Augustine, Basil, Athanasius, John Chrysostom, and Jerome. These brilliant, embattled, and sometimes eccentric men defined the biblical canon, hammered out the Creed, and gave us our understanding of sacraments and salvation. It is they who preserved the rich legacy of the early Church for us.

    Mike C says: "Masterful summary of the early Church Fathers"
    "When the church was young and catholic"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    D'Ambrosio is a good writer, the book moved along at a nice pace. I did quickly discover the book is written from an overtly catholic perspective and was likely intended for a catholic audience. The main emphasis of the book is how concepts like apostolic succession, Transubstantiation, prayer to saints, the emasculate conception, the elevation of Mary to the "Mother of God", paying penance, infant baptism, etc... were taught by the church fathers, and therefore, it should be assumed that they originated from the Jesus' apostles. However, some of the church fathers arguments, for these doctrine listed above, in response to the damnable "heretics" who opposed them, sounded absolutely illogical, silly and ridiculous, yet D'Ambriosio presented them as knock down irrefutable proofs for Catholic doctrine... but just because a beloved Saint says 2+2=5 doesn't make it so Joe. But yeah, overall, I did enjoy the book and I liked D'Ambrosio's high admiration for the church fathers, it helped bring the history to life.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Paul: In Fresh Perspective

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 41 mins)
    • By N. T. Wright
    • Narrated By Simon Vance
    Overall
    (67)
    Performance
    (44)
    Story
    (42)

    N.T. Wright's accessible new volume, built on his Cambridge University Hulsean Lectures of 2004, takes a fresh look at Paul in light of recent understandings of his Jewish roots, his attitude toward the Roman Empire, and his unique reframing of Jewish symbols in relation to his experience of the risen Christ. Then Wright attempts a short systematic account of the main theological contours of Paul's thought and its pertinence for the church today.

    Brenton says: "Like reading a commentary on audio"
    "Second time around"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    When I originally purchased this audiobook and gave it a listen, I couldn't follow it at all, for I was completely alien to the context, the scholars debates and the different perspectives out there. Without a basic awareness of these things, N.T Wrights writings on Paul, didn't have any shelf to rest on, it was all Greek to me. But now several years later, having become a little more familiar with the issues, I listened to the book again and found it really interesting, so good in fact, that I may listen to it again and take notes.This work compilation of of lectures on matters of what Wright expounds on much more elsewhere, some of Wrights insights are subtle; that don't necessarily stick out or seem ground-breaking on the surface, even now I can follow him, if I am not paying close attention, what he writes brush right past me. But I have found when I do truly listen to what he is saying, Wright often is illuminating and does have some fresh perspectives

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 50 mins)
    • By James Joyce
    • Narrated By Jim Killavey
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (14)
    Performance
    (4)
    Story
    (4)

    The story traces the intellectual and religio-philosophical awakening of young Stephen Dedalus as he begins to question and rebel against the Catholic and Irish conventions he has been brought up in. He finally leaves for Paris to pursue his calling as an artist. The work pioneers some of Joyce's modernist techniques that would later come to fruition in Ulysses and Finnegan's Wake.

    Empowerment says: "Amazing book!"
    "Narrator is terrible and sound quality is bad"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

    A good quality production and a good narrator


    Has A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man turned you off from other books in this genre?

    No


    Would you be willing to try another one of Jim Killavey’s performances?

    No


    You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

    The narrator was so bad, that I didn't listen to much, so I can't judge the book.


    Any additional comments?

    Beware, its like they used a low quality tape recorder to record Killavey read this book. Look elsewhere. Sadly, I got this book before the days when you could return bad audiobooks to audible.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • No One Sees God: The Dark Night of Atheists and Believers

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 32 mins)
    • By Michael Novak
    • Narrated By Michael Novak
    Overall
    (4)
    Performance
    (3)
    Story
    (2)

    This book appraches the reality of spiritual engagement in today's challenging world. Novak engages the thought of prominent contemporary atheists Christopher Hitchens, Sam Harris, Richard Dawkins, and Daniel Dennett. He describes the struggle to know ourselves and to participate in the life of this world as it plays out for believers and non-believers.

    John says: "I wish the whole book was about no one seeing God"
    "I wish the whole book was about no one seeing God"
    Overall
    Performance

    At the beginning of the book Novak dove right into a subject that is extremely interesting to me, about how no one sees God and about the dark night of the soul (which often last a life-time for some). He wrote about Mother Teresa and how most of her life she only felt God's absence, silence and cold shoulder. In Novak's view, this is the normal Christian life and what mature Christian should expect. Only immature Christians get to experience Christ intimately, basking in his sweet nearness, eventually we grow up and must only feel nothingness, yet are suppose to keep the faith anyways. But as soon as he gives his extreme opinions, he just lets them drop and never goes into any depth or tries to make his perspective persuasive. So yeah, I was hoping the whole book would be centered around the title and subtitle of the book. But really only the first tiny bit of it was. After that the rest of the book is pretty much him going on and on (its a long book) talking about the new fundamentalist atheist and then he sets out his catholic apologetic in response and though some of it was interesting, it began to get really old towards the end. I listened to the audiobook narrated by the author, and sadly I report Novak reads slow and has an irritating voice, making it hard to finish the audiobook.

    3 of 5 people found this review helpful

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