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Joki

Helsinki | Member Since 2008

ratings
99
REVIEWS
83
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
16
HELPFUL VOTES
181

  • Never Less Than a Lady

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 27 mins)
    • By Mary Jo Putney
    • Narrated By Simon Prebble
    Overall
    (224)
    Performance
    (170)
    Story
    (168)

    RITA Award-winning, New York Times best-selling author Mary Jo Putney is justly celebrated as a master of the Regency romance. Here Alexander Randall is the last heir to the Earl of Daventry and he must find himself a bride. His prayers are answered in the form of distressed midwife Julia Bancroft. But though their union would benefit both parties, Julia is reluctant to surrender her heart.

    Joki says: "Avoids the Cliches of the Genre"
    "Avoids the Cliches of the Genre"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I purchased the Audible book after a great sale recently. I had read and liked Mary Jo Putney's works in the past (though not in the last decade) and decided to find a good Summer read.

    What I really liked about this book is that it managed to avoid nearly every cliche that are so rampant in the romance field right now. Despite there being many chances, there were no "great misunderstanding" and the characters reacted logically, calmly, and intelligently to situations. There was no evil 'big baddie' forcing deus et machina situations. The female character isn't an annoying 'spitfire' who gets into situations just so she can be rescued by the alpha male. The male isn't even alpha - he's respectful of the heroine but not so much that it is anachronistic. The Heroine doesn't suddenly develop the ability to shoot a gun, ride a horse, or any other implausible ability just to get out of a situation. Nor is modern knowledge of medicine used to make fun of the doctoring of that era.

    What we have is a very gentle, well written, emotionally resonating story of two people getting to know each other and learning to trust. It is skillfully plotted novel that doesn't rely on action so much as communication to build the relationship over time. It's what I would characterize as a mature novel - for those who are tired of the cliches and overwrought plots and just want a novel of two decent people, with hard pasts, who learn to overcome their own fears of intimacy to create a love match.

    The audible narrator, though male, did an excellent job of both the female and male voices as well as the plot.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Stormdancer: The Lotus War, Book One

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 47 mins)
    • By Jay Kristoff
    • Narrated By Jennifer Ikeda
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (119)
    Performance
    (116)
    Story
    (115)

    The Shima Imperium verges on the brink of environmental collapse; an island nation once rich in tradition and myth, now decimated by clockwork industrialization and the machine-worshipers of the Lotus Guild. The skies are red as blood, the land is choked with toxic pollution, and the great spirit animals that once roamed its wilds have departed forever.

    Brad says: "Good first book, good listen"
    "Kind of Boring"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Stormdancer had two great things going for it: alternative universe Japan and steampunk. And if you had never been introduced to either of those worlds, then you likely would have been fascinated by the 'wealth' (read: truckload) of info dumping done to describe them. But as a long time Otaku and steampunk aficionado, I'm not impressed by the mythology or worldbuilding any more - I know it already. I want a great story first, not tell and never show. But it was all tell and I was bored to tears by this simplistic plot.

    Plot: selfish jerk of a Shogun wants to show he's powerful and orders his chief beastmaster to go capture a griffin. Beastmaster and daughter (main character, Yukiko) set out on what is a hopeless task but they run into one. Griffin escapes, Yukiko uses her 'demon' powers to communicate and placate beast, they return to main City, and set out to kill evil emperor Shogun.

    Right off the bat, the pace was slow, with lots of descriptions and info dumps, and the characters were very flat. There was so much loving descriptions going on about the world that it was almost annoying to have characters in that pretty place. I loved the entire concept of Lotus plants powering a steampunk type of world. And there were some great chances to really interject horror elements into the plots - demons and sacrifices and ritual deaths. But the author never stayed with the story and kind of meandered through the plot so he could show off his knowledge. This was a book that felt 600 pages long - I kept stopping and it was nearly impossible to want to return to the drudgery of endless mythology descriptions, Japanese history descriptions, societal ranking descriptions, blah blah. Especially since I was so well aware of it already anyway.

    I know many will rail against how the author has portrayed Japan; but hey, it is an alternate universe. I don't mind the way he set it up at all and was fascinated by the things that were NOT authentic Japanese history. But the characters really need to live and breathe in that world and no one in the story did that. Everyone talked the same, acted the same, in very simplistic manners. There really was no subtlety or subterfuge, complexities or nuances. And that's where the story really started to drag with me. If the speaker wasn't named, it could have been ANY character that was speaking, male or female. The Achilles heel of this book was the lack of action and pace.

    I listened to the Audible version and the author did a decent job, though there were some irritating tics in there. But she made it easy to differentiate between the different characters, giving them much more personality than the writer did.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The School for Good and Evil: The School for Good and Evil, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 46 mins)
    • By Soman Chainani
    • Narrated By Polly Lee
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (47)
    Performance
    (45)
    Story
    (46)

    Welcome to the School for Good and Evil, where best friends Sophie and Agatha are about to embark on the adventure of a lifetime. With her glass slippers and devotion to good deeds, Sophie knows she'll earn top marks at the School for Good and join the ranks of past students like Cinderella, Rapunzel, and Snow White. Meanwhile, Agatha, with her shapeless black frocks and wicked black cat, seems a natural fit for the villains in the School for Evil.

    Sparkee RN says: "Great Book!"
    "Hollow at the Center"
    Overall
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    Story


    The School of Good and Evil is an interesting book - what is essentially a riff on fairytales ends up being a straight adventure story lacking any of the morals upon which it is based; as such, it ends without making a point and contradicting itself and the characters throughout. Less demanding readers will read it as a simple tween romp and enjoy it as such. But more demanding readers may be frustrated by the lack of point of view by the author.

    Story: Agatha and Sophie live in an isolated village in the middle of a forest. Every year, the 'headmaster' of the School for Good and Evil comes and takes two children in the night to be students in his school. Sophie eagerly wants to go: she's sure she'll be a fairy tale princess. Down to Earth Agatha, however, finds the whole thing pathetic. When both girls are taken to the school, Sophie ends up in the school for evil (to be a witch) and Agatha lands in the school for princesses. With both girls sure they are in the wrong place, how will they survive their schoolmates long enough to get back to their village?

    Most of the book is a fish-out-of-water story of each girl dealing with the horrors of their situation: beautiful Sophie with the farting/warted/dowdy evils and grounded Agatha dealing with the vain and superficial princesses. There should be a lot to mine here and a lot to be said about not falling into the cliches of either group. But somehow nothing is really said - is Sophie evil in her heart? Is Agatha really purely good despite her frogs and antisocial behavior? Are the princesses, with the callous and selfishness, really good? And are the evils really born that way or made so through cruel treatment? The answer ends up muddled in each of those situations as the story mostly concerns Agatha trying to get home and Sophie stymieing her. Even a point that neither is wholly good or wholly evil fails to materialize in this muddled plot.

    In listening to this Audible version (in which the narrator did an excellent job), I kept feeling like there was going to be something deeper than the shallow story on top. The story really lacked nuance, depth, and especially a POV by the author to make this really work for me.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Altered Destiny

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 56 mins)
    • By Shawna Thomas
    • Narrated By Uma Incrocci
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (69)
    Performance
    (62)
    Story
    (61)

    Selia has run her family's tavern since she was 15 and can hunt and fight as the equal of any male. When she rescues a badly wounded man and nurses him back to health, she has no idea she's about to change not only her life, but also the destinies of two peoples….

    Racheal says: "Wow! It was perfect!"
    "More Romance Than Fantasy"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Although only alluded to in the book, this is actually a dystopian acting as a fantasy. It's strength is fairly grounded main character who doesn't rush off constantly so she can be saved by mysterious bad guy. But it's weakness is that there really is nothing new here and the writing lacks sophistication enough to really draw me in. I never invested in the story or the characters and honestly was a bit bored throughout. It started to play out more like a bodice ripper romance than a fantasy.

    Selia owns a tavern and can take care of herself - good with both blade and her brain. When she rescues a man she soon discovers is one of the reviled Svistra, she will embark on a quest that will pit her against both her people and the Svistra. At its heart, though, is her growing love of the Svistra warrior she rescued.

    This dystopian world is not too terrible: clealry the Svistra are genetic mutations meant to enhance their physical abilities. This put them at odds with the normal humans, who mistrust them and continually break treaties. Author Thomas has a lot of fun with the world, imagining all kinds of mutations from whatever caused the world to revert back to medieval trappings.

    But as the story progressed, I really began to lose interest. There was nothing really new added to the dystopian or fantasy genre (though I appreciate the author didn't have to spell out that this was a dystopian and not a fantasy). I honestly had read this type of plot often in historical romances, especially Scottish, and at this stage in my reading, I really want something different and more unique.

    The writing is decent and I was able to follow the story well. I listened to the Audible version and the narrator did a decent job.

    This is the type of book that is great for those who want a romance. Perhaps less so for those who want a fantasy or dystopian.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Born at Midnight: Shadow Falls, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 27 mins)
    • By C. C. Hunter
    • Narrated By Katie Schorr
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (473)
    Performance
    (426)
    Story
    (424)

    One night Kylie Galen finds herself at the wrong party, with the wrong people, and it changes her life forever. Her mother ships her off to Shadow Falls - a camp for troubled teens, and within hours of arriving, it becomes painfully clear that her fellow campers aren’t just "troubled". Here at Shadow Falls, vampires, werewolves, shapshifters, witches and fairies train side by side - learning to harness their powers, control their magic, and live in the normal world. Kylie’s never felt normal, but surely she doesn’t belong here with a bunch of paranormal freaks either. Or does she?

    Angela says: "Outstanding!!"
    "Great For Tweens"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story


    Born at Midnight is an unapologetically young teen oriented book that tackles issues of teen pregnancy, drugs, bullying, parent issues, and more within an urban fantasy setting. Rating this from the perspective of a teen, it's definitely a 5. But more mature readers/adults may find the messages overly heavy and the teens a bit too, well, teen. Kudos to the author for giving us authentic, confused, and realistic teens that aren't overly mature.

    The story follows Kylie, a teen who, after being at a party that goes wrong, becomes guilty by association of being a druggie. Her parents are divorcing, things are falling apart fast, and now she finds herself at some dorky Summer camp. But it's not just ordinary summer camp; rather, she finds out quickly that it is a camp for kids with paranormal abilities. And she may just be paranormal herself. But not everyone is happy the camp exists, that paranormals comingle with normies, and they will work hard to destroy the camp for good.

    The teens in the book feel very real. I appreciated that Kylie's parents weren't good or bad, but were dealing with their own demons and issues. As well, most of the paranormal kids were going through the same issues as normal teens - boyfriends/girlfriends, social issues, fitting in, etc. As such, the characters feel authentic and react in predictable ways. This could have been a story about the paranormal aspects but it really isn't. It's about being a teen.

    I'm going to rate this a solid 4. Admittedly, as an adult, I never got into the story or the teens. But I also respect that if I had read this as a teen, I would have absolutely loved it.

    I listened to the audible version of this and the narrator did an excellent job.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Terms of Enlistment

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 40 mins)
    • By Marko Kloos
    • Narrated By Luke Daniels
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (300)
    Performance
    (275)
    Story
    (275)

    The year is 2108, and the North American Commonwealth is bursting at the seams. For welfare rats like Andrew Grayson, there are only two ways out of the crime-ridden and filthy welfare tenements, where you’re restricted to 2,000 calories of badly flavored soy every day. You can hope to win the lottery and draw a ticket on a colony ship settling off-world, or you can join the service. With the colony lottery a pipe dream, Andrew chooses to enlist in the armed forces for a shot at real food, a retirement bonus, and maybe a ticket off Earth.

    DAVE says: "Solid military sci-fi."
    "Enjoyed The Story"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Terms of Enlistment is by no means a perfect book but it was one I enjoyed immensely: a non blustery military sci fi that isn't in love with its tech, its military, or right wing politics. Rather, we have an everyman navigating the military as a way out of a dead end life on welfare, who won't suddenly end up captaining a ship or becoming an insta-leader. As well, I appreciated that we didn't have a gender-specific army but instead had capable roles for male and female characters. I read the second book in the series, Lines of Departure, first and liked it enough to buy this first book.

    Story: Andrew Grayson joins the military as a way out of an untenable life in the welfare system of the North American government. He will go through training school and then end up tackling the problematic situation of the deteriorating social structure on Earth. But what is happening on Earth is only one problem in a universe that is about to expand rapidly - and the military is suddenly going to become very needed.

    What I liked about the books is that we have a very ordinary guy. Although he sounds far too educated to have come from a welfare system in which he didn't get higher education (there are no colloquialisms, slang, dialects, etc.) I actually preferred that simple talk for a simple man. Both this first book and the second book start slowly but really pick up steam by midway through. And then, when the action kicks in, Kloos really knows how to escalate it - his characters don't have bad days, they have *really* bad days.

    This is the type of story that isn't about kick butt marines, balls out action, or being macho. It's about being lucky to survive, a feeling of futility but also hope, and living in a world on the brink of falling apart on many levels.

    I listened to the audible version of this and enjoyed the narration.

    9 of 10 people found this review helpful
  • Dualed

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 59 mins)
    • By Elsie Chapman
    • Narrated By Alicyn Packard
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (13)
    Performance
    (11)
    Story
    (11)

    The city of Kersh is a safe haven, but the price of safety is high. Everyone has a genetic Alternate - a twin raised by another family - and citizens must prove their worth by eliminating their Alts before their twentieth birthday. Survival means advanced schooling, a good job, marriage - life. Fifteen-year-old West Grayer has trained as a fighter, preparing for the day when her assignment arrives and she will have one month to hunt down and kill her Alt. But then a tragic misstep shakes West’s confidence.

    Joki says: "Decent"
    "Decent"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Dualed is the type of book that created an ambivalence in me; on the one hand, there are quite a few items in there that bucks YA dystopian trends (she's an assassin, for example, and by definition, NOT a unique snowflake). But on the other hand, yet again we have a 'too good to be real/never gets upset' and 'ignore best advice and do your own thing' syndromes. What keeps this at a firm 3 stars for me is that a lot of the middle feels like filler to flesh out a basic premise.

    Story: West lives in a post apocalyptic society where each person is created with an exact duplicate. The society prides itself on defense preparedness and a competition in the teen years means that every 'partial' will eventually have to kill their duplicate in order to become complete and join society. West has lost most of her family to partial kills or from collateral damage of someone else's kill. Alone, she chooses to become a Striker, an assassin for hire to take out other people's duplicates. She hopes this training will prepare her to face her own trial/assignment; which comes sooner than she would have hoped.

    Honestly, after the premise of the story is revealed, I expected a long drawn cat and mouse where our main character would have to outwit her opponent. Instead, West spends most of the book avoiding having to meet up with her duplicate and being saved by her love interest, Chord. This was problematic since the problem of her duplicate was far more interesting than her becoming a Striker/assassin. Indeed, the author failed to show any 'training' she received as a result of being a Striker (she was thrown out into assignment immediately) and perhaps the only thing she learned was that hesitation is deadly. But really, the experience of killing a 'hit' was different than killing your duplicate/alt since you can blend as a Striker but everyone knows when you are in the middle of your assignment to kill your alt.

    I had expected we would get a lot of morally-hesitant kills (e.g., killing bad people or people who 'deserved' it) and was pleasantly surprised the author refused to take the easy route. But with West's own alt, I felt it would have been better to make her a more sympathetic (or even better) character than alt. That would have put a lot more ambiguity and better message about the dystopian society. Instead, if West kills her alt, she can say she was the worthy one - and the dystopian society's policies become sound and sanctioned.

    In the end, the conflicting messages (dystopian killing society is right), daring plot devices (she kills innocents!), and lack of logic (if you do something to get training in weapons/killing, then GET the training already) make this a solid 3 stars.

    Note: I listened to the Audible version of this story and the narrator did an excellent job.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Lost Sun: United States of Asgard, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 56 mins)
    • By Tessa Gratton
    • Narrated By Robbie Daymond
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (8)
    Performance
    (8)
    Story
    (8)

    Fans of Neil Gaiman's American Gods and Holly Black's The Curse Workers will embrace this richly drawn, Norse-mythology-infused alternate world: the United States of Asgard. Seventeen-year-old Soren Bearskin is trying to escape the past. His father, a famed warrior, lost himself to the battle-frenzy and killed thirteen innocent people. Soren cannot deny that berserking is in his blood - the fevers, insomnia, and occasional feelings of uncontrollable rage haunt him. So he tries to remain calm and detached from everyone at Sanctus Sigurd's Academy.

    Joki says: "Very Original"
    "Very Original"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The Lost Sun is a book that defies so many YA conventions: unapologetically violent, a very low key romance, and for once, a story that is not about an entitled unique snowflake girl. As well, the world building is unique, the voice dark yet grounded, and the main character flawed but with unique strengths. At heart, this is a road trip with a decided conclusion at the end despite being the first in a series.

    In the United States of Asgard, Viking gods walk the Earth and magic, trolls, and mythos are very much a part of the landscape. Soren is the son of a berserker - one who went mad and killed innocents before being put down. His father was legendary for his valor and strength; now for his fall from grace. In that shadow, Soren wishes freedom from the berserker ability within him. When he meets Astrid, a seer, he will join her on a quest to find the lost sun Baldur the Beautiful; Baldur did not rise with the sunrise and the people are worried. But there is far more at stake than one lost god and Soren, along with Astrid, will come into contact with several of the Gods as they are caught up in Asgardian machinations.

    The premise of having a modern America under Viking influence rather than European is quite distinct and well realized here. From the new names of cars, to unique soft drinks, to the way society reacts and acts; they are all logical conclusions to the Asgardian influence. The book is layered and nuanced but would ultimately fail if we didn't invest in the main characters. Fortunately, Gratton does an excellent job of giving us realistic and grounded individuals despite the supernatural elements in the story.

    There was such a plausibility and authenticity to the characters and setting that we invested in the world and wanted to see if they would reach their goals at the end. There were a few twists, some were obvious, but overall the story followed a satisfying arc and the author neither overwrote nor overplayed the mysteries.

    In all, a great read and I eagerly await the second in the series. Note: I listened to the Audible version and the narrator did an excellent job.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Steadfast: The Lost Fleet: Beyond the Frontier, Book 4

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 20 mins)
    • By Jack Campbell
    • Narrated By Christian Rummel
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (782)
    Performance
    (739)
    Story
    (740)

    Geary and the crew of the Dauntless have managed to safely escort important alien representatives to Earth. But before they can make tracks for home, two of Geary’s key lieutenants vanish. The search for his missing men leads Geary on a far-flung chase, ultimately ending at the one spot in space from which all humans have been banned: The moon Europa. Any ship that lands there must stay or be destroyed—leaving Geary to face the most profound moral dilemma of his life.

    rich says: "Black Jack Faces His Toughest Opponent Yet"
    "Excellent 10th in the Series"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I had wondered in what direction the story would go after what seemed like an arc-ending plot in the previous book, Guardian (finding the Dancers and then bringing them to Earth). But in this book 4 of the Beyond the Frontier saga, author Campbell continues to impress and somehow manages to completely up the ante. But it isn't all new storyline: reoccurring themes such as the mystery of the 'dancing lights' in hyperspace, as well as newer plot developments of the secretly constructed new fleet are brought up here again and more tantalizing hints given. It makes for great space opera: overall story arcs across the entire series, smaller story arcs across subseries, and then several book-only arcs all weave together superbly.

    Story: Geary is vacationing on Earth with Desjani, dealing with the homeworld's endless bureaucracy and paperwork. When two of the Dauntless' officers are kidnapped, Geary tracks them down to a world wiped clean by a man-made virus and then strictly quarantined. Meanwhile, he will also be sent on a seemingly insignificant errand to deal with Syndicate refugees. He's going to find that the Syndicate isn't quite done with him yet. And as for the Dancers - they are leaving tantalizing hints that something is very wrong in the universe. And at its heart, the Alliance itself.

    All the usual battle scenes are here - with a surprising and inventive new battle at the end. There is also a lot of soul searching as Geary begins to realize he might just be guided by the Living Stars after all. Themes such as his reliance and growth from Rione and Desjani are given new light when he is separated from the Dauntless and instead accompanies Duellos on a seemingly futile mission. And an old menace from the very first book makes a reappearance to cause mayhem.

    I have to hand it to Campbell for creating yet a new, highly significant, and very dangerous enemy by the end of this book. He will, literally, have to completely change everything he does/knows about warfare if he hopes to survive. And, of course, his reliance on his officers is now especially important.

    The one thing you can count on with Campbell's books are the many Chekhov's Guns throughout most of the early parts of each book. I was greatly surprised this time and didn't spot any of them until the reveals at the end. Some are subtle, some are obvious, but all show the thought that goes into the writing of each of these series.

    The question is: in this 10th book in the overall series, are the plots/books still fresh and do we still have all the great space opera action, human characters, and unique plots? And the answer is an unequivocal yes. I eagerly await the next book - and until then will continue to follow the Midway-set Lost Stars series as well (which had an appearance in this book).

    Note: I chose the Audible version of this story and it continues with the same narrator as all the previous books.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • For Honor We Stand: Man of War, Book 2

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 37 mins)
    • By H. Paul Honsinger
    • Narrated By Ray Chase
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (315)
    Performance
    (302)
    Story
    (302)

    In 2315, the Earth Union is losing a 30-year-long war with the Krag Hegemony. Having encountered the Krag before, Space Commander Max Robicheaux now faces daunting challenges aboard the USS Cumberland: The dangers from the enemy without…and clashes with crew and superiors within. Meanwhile, Doctor Sahin receives a coded message summoning him to a secret meeting which aims to forge an alliance that could change the balance of power in Known Space.

    David says: "The Answer should have been "Nuts!""
    "Decent Second in the Series"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This second book in the Man of War Trilogy manages to not fall into a sophomore slump and continues in the tradition of the first book. The characters are still smug, overexplain every situation, and do a lot of speeches. Despite my frustration with the egregious use of telling and not showing, there is something endearing about the series that will keep me reading to the third volume.

    Story: The Cumberland crew continue their work in space, but this time earning new alien alliances while at the same time escalating the war with the Krag. Just as the doctor pulled off at the end of book one with the glass art, so does Robichaux pull off at the end of this book with, of all things, a Krag battleship.

    What I like about the series is the diversity: of religions, ethnicities, viewpoints. We have a wide range of characters from different places on Earth (even non existent ones, as done with the Romanovs and Latin). As well, the story does have many characters and they are decently fleshed out and idiosyncratic.

    What frustrates me (though these are likely style choices of the author and therefore not something changeable) are the constant speeches, excessive dialogue (every person always asks another to fully explain any point like a teacher to a student, regardless of who they are), and that there's just too much knowledge on hand. Our captain knows physics, obscure military history, observational information on alien species, as well as perfect psychology with his staff. It beggers belief, to be honest, that everyone knows everything all the time, off the top of their head, at the right moment, and will explain it in finite detail. It can quickly veer into Marty Stu territory.

    If you've read the first book and enjoyed it, you'll definitely enjoy the second. I was on the fence about reading the second but an Amazon Kindle deal/Audible deal swayed me. I did roll my eyes several times at all the pompous and smugness - but that was also exacerbated by the Audible narration, which had a very good narrator but his way of trailing off sentences as if bored ended up feeling a bit like William Shatner in Star Trek. It was so overly emoted that it overemphasized the excessive unnatural wordiness of the dialogue.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Forging Zero: The Legend of ZERO

    • UNABRIDGED (18 hrs and 40 mins)
    • By Sara King
    • Narrated By Liam Owen
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (208)
    Performance
    (195)
    Story
    (196)

    The oldest of the children drafted from humanity's devastated planet, Joe is impressed into service by the alien Congressional Ground Force - and becomes the unwitting centerpiece in a millennia-long alien struggle for independence. Once his training begins, one of the elusive and prophetic Trith appears to give Joe a spine chilling prophecy that the universe has been anticipating for millions of years: Joe will be the one to finally shatter the vast alien government known as Congress. And the Trith cannot lie...but first Joe has to make it through bootcamp.

    Joshua says: "Great book that up till recently was Kindle only"
    "Grim and Dark - and a Terrible Audible Production"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Forging Zero is the first in a character-driven sci fi series featuring aliens, battles, and life in a boot camp for the galactic congressional army. The story is very engaging but also very grim; readers who have a hard time seeing children tortured, murdered, or abused should probably avoid the title.

    Story: the galaxy congress of alien species has found the Earth. As entree into their government, they require all children between 5 and 12 be turned over to be enlisted into their army. Joe Dobbs is 14 but takes the place of his younger brother. Thus begins his grueling boot camp on an alien world as the children are brutalized and trained, and given growth hormones to create adult bodies but still housing the minds of children. Many won't last the first week.

    The author smartly brings in backstories for most of Joe's group of young kids. This provides understanding and impetus for each of their actions. Some embrace the new world, some are eaten up whole by it, and others adapt as best they can. But each person does feel like a fully formed character and they always sound like children.

    I'm not really a fan of alien POVs - they just end up sounding too human. What we have here is a brutal "Full Metal Jacket" situation with aliens and their physical advantages over the humans - both physical and as the power in the system. No alien or person is wholly good or evil and often do both good and very bad things at the same time. As well, our main character Joe also is both strong and weak in many areas. His main advantage is being the son of a Marine and at least having hit puberty naturally; but at the same time, he can't hold onto his ideals in the face of the situation in which he is faced.

    Although the above makes the book sound more like a hard sci fi bookcamp such as Ender's Game, it really isn't. The prose is easy and the story very easy to follow. Although this could very well be followed by YA and tweens, I would advise against it due to the hopeless nature of their situation and the very graphic/continual violence. Anything good that happens to the children is more like a starved man finding a crumb rather than a meal.

    Although I finished this first book, it was a bit too dark/hard to read at many times and I will probably not continue the series.

    Of note, I listened to the Audible version and the narrator was excellent. But the production was the most annoying and distracting I have had the misfortune to encounter. Weird sound effects to denote inner monologues, ending chapter sentences right on top of the next chapter sentence, and a high pitched, nerve rattling chimes to signal a change in scene made me want to throw my iphone across the room. Especially those chimes - scared the living crap out of me every time they suddenly sounded. Don't listen to this with headphones if you have a weak bladder. But you also don't have to worry about falling asleep listening.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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