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Laura

Everett, WA, United States | Member Since 2015

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  • The Other Brain: From Dementia to Schizophrenia, How New Discoveries About the Brain are Revolutionizing Medicine and Science

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 54 mins)
    • By R. Douglas Fields
    • Narrated By Victor Bevine, R. Douglas Fields
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (177)
    Performance
    (120)
    Story
    (120)

    Despite everything that has been written about the brain, a very important part of this vital organ has been overlooked in most books - until now. The Other Brain is the story of glia, which make up approximately 85 percent of the cells in the brain. Long neglected as little more than cerebral packing material ("glia" means glue), glia are sparking a revolution in brain science.

    Douglas says: "Some bit of knowledge in the field of neurology..."
    "Not bad, lots of unnecessary detail"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I enjoyed this book for the most part, once I got past the beginning. I am very interested in dementia as I had a grandfather that suffered from alzheimers. I have read articles and books on the brain, alzheimers and autism. I find it facination and informative.

    This book had some good information. However, the beginning is so long and boring, full of explinations of anatomy. I understand that some set up is neccessary. Fine, I'll wade through what ever setup is applicable to the subject at hand. However, i don't want to sit through hours of not only anatomy lessons and cell types, but a history lesson of not only who discovered the cells/processes, where they discovered them and how, but also THEIR history, such as who made a mad dash for the north pole and who went on to invent mining machinery. Seriously? How is any of that relevent AT ALL? Why do I need to know that so-and-so who discovered x-y-z cells or invented such-and-such cell staining methods was also an althetic dare devil who journeyed to the north pole in a boat drozen in an ice sheet, had to eat his dogs to survive and lived with eskimos? I don't. It drove me crazy and made me dislike the begining of this book. It was bad, and went on and on and on. This whole mess is in terrible need of an editor. I kept asking myself how this extrainious information made it into the book, and the only explination I could come up with, was that is was fluff to fill up space in a book that would have been much shorter.

    The narrator did a good job though. Even through the boring, extrainious information, he had a good tone of voice, conveying interest and emotion.

    The real subject of the title, disorders and illnesses and such, didn't start until 1.5 hours into it. If you already know the anatomy of cells, the brain, the nervous system and the methods of study/staining, you could probably skip to the 1.5 hours mark and not miss anything.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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