You no longer follow Amazon Customer

You will no longer see updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can re-follow a user if you change your mind.

OK

You now follow Amazon Customer

You will receive updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can unfollow a user if you change your mind.

OK

Amazon Customer

tired teacher

Utah | Member Since 2009

956
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 207 reviews
  • 331 ratings
  • 1 titles in library
  • 29 purchased in 2014
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
244

  • Same Kind of Different as Me

    • ABRIDGED (3 hrs and 28 mins)
    • By Ron Hall, Denver Moore, Lynn Vincent
    • Narrated By Dan Butler, Barry Scott
    Overall
    (411)
    Performance
    (171)
    Story
    (177)

    A dangerous, homeless drifter who grew up picking cotton in virtual slavery. An upscale art dealer accustomed to the world of Armani and Chanel. A gutsy woman with a stubborn dream. A story so incredible no novelist would dare dream it.

    Maria says: "Buy the printed book on this one..."
    "What a bittersweet story!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    What a bittersweet story. I was enthralled from the get-go, my favorite way to start a book. This true story is told from two points of view. One, a 20th century "slave" in the deep south; the other, an affluent art dealer. After years working for "the man," the black man just walked off the plantation sometime in the 1960s. He did not know how to read or write. He did not know the US had been involved in several wars during his lifetime, including two world wars. He did not know he could have enlisted with the service, that he could have received an education, or anything else. To him, it was still slave times. He thought he was doing well when he lived in a two-room shack without heat or running water or electricity because he was at least able to provide for himself. However he never received a paycheck. Everything he received was on credit through the company store, to which he was forever in debt. He could never pay the debt off. Long story short, he meets the art dealer at a homeless shelter. Because of the art dealer's wife, he befriends the homeless man. The two have a profound life-altering effect on one another. But who is to say which one has the most profound effect?

    I loved this audiobook. I loved the narrators. I loved the different points of view, and I love what I learned from it. I highly recommend it to just about anyone. But be forewarned. You won't want to stop once you start it.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • A World Undone: The Story of the Great War, 1914 to 1918

    • UNABRIDGED (27 hrs and 58 mins)
    • By G. J. Meyer
    • Narrated By Robin Sachs
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (508)
    Performance
    (457)
    Story
    (452)

    The First World War is one of history’s greatest tragedies. In this remarkable and intimate account, author G. J. Meyer draws on exhaustive research to bring to life the story of how the Great War reduced Europe’s mightiest empires to rubble, killed 20 million people, and cracked the foundations of the world we live in today. World War I is unique in the number of questions about it that remain unsettled. After more than 90 years, scholars remain divided on these questions, and it seems likely that they always will.

    Andrew Pilecki says: "Excellent Overview of the "Overshadowed" War"
    "War is the work of the Devil"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    "War is the work of the devil." So says one of the generals of WWI, although I couldn't find the quote as I went back and looked for it in this 715 page history, so I can't even report for sure who said it. It doesn't really matter, though, because as I continued to study this book, if I got one thing from it, it would be that war is undoubtedly and indisputably Hell with a capital H. Living all my life hearing about WWI and II, I have never really been able to put the pieces together to make sense of it all. Several months ago I went on a WWII binge, reading and listening to a lot of books on it until I think I finally have at least a working knowledge of what it was all about. It seemed to follow that I then learn about WWI, and so I have been. This book offers a great starting point for the study of that war. I tried studying other books first, but got hopelessly lost. This book, by virtue of the way that is written, made it very accessible to me, and now I can study some of those other books with a degree of knowledge that will help me add to my understanding.

    I really like the format of the book, particularly the short intermediary background chapters that shed so much light on the core story of the war. It helped so much with understanding the how and the why of the war, and events that it precipitated.

    So in a nutshell, outside of the logistics and battles and armaments and all of that usual and necessary war stuff, here is what I learned. This war was fought for the flimsiest of reasons, if in fact there was a reason at all. Nations can act very much like two-year-old children fighting over an inexpensive toy. Over 9.5 million soldiers lost their lives over these petty squabbles, not to mention many more millions who were moderately to severely wounded, nor the millions of civilians who who were wounded or killed. The Germans were justified in being outraged at the way they were treated in the Treaty of Versailles, particularly by Woodrow Wilson, and we all know where that lead, or at least I hope we do.

    I hope many more of us are willing to put forth the effort to learn the truth about war in the hopes of avoiding it in the future. The way things appear to me right now, it seems that we are going down this same path, and that scares me. No wonder Santayana, widely quoted by others, including Winston Churchill, has said, "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it."

    As I started listening to this book, I felt the need to follow along with the physical book, and so I bought a copy. It was extremely helpful, as the book is full of pictures and maps, and I could see the names of people and places that were hard for me to grasp from just hearing them, names of German, Belgian and French cities, rivers and regions that to us do not sound like we think they should. A good example is the French town of Ypres, pronounced Eep. (One would be disappointed to look for the town of Eep on a map.). The narrator was just right for this book, and had a great command over multiple European accents. This was a great book to both read and listen to. I highly recommend it for anyone wanting to know more about the history of WWI and what the ramifications for us have been.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Papillon

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 56 mins)
    • By Henri Charriere
    • Narrated By Michael Prichard
    Overall
    (39)
    Performance
    (36)
    Story
    (37)

    Sentenced to life imprisonment in the penal colony of French Guiana for a crime he did not commit, Henri Charriere became obsessed with one goal: escape. After planning and executing a series of treacherous yet failed attempts over many years, he was eventually sent to the notorious prison Devil's Island, a place from which no one had ever escaped - until Papillon.

    Amazon Customer says: "Well Written Autobiography"
    "Well Written Autobiography"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Although this is an autobiography, it reads like a novel. I loved reading this book. But once again it highlights the fact that humans can be the most vicious and mean species on the face of the earth. Papillon was not perfect, in fact he did some pretty bad things, but he did not commit the murder he was accused of, and for which he was sent to prison for life. Not just prison, but hard labor, with long stretches of solitary confinement in which he could talk to no one, ask for nothing, and never even see the sun. Papillon tried to escape 10 times and was totally successful the first time. If he hadn't decided he wanted to live somewhere else, he would never have been found and been reimprisoned. I remember seeing the movie with Steve McQueen years ago, and now I want to see it again.

    More than anything else, this book taught me to never give up no matter how bleak the outlook. Some days I really need to remember that lesson.

    I was a little "if-y" about Michael Prichard as a narrator at first, but I came to realize that his style and vocal characteristics are perfect for this story. Highly recommended.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Macbeth: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 45 mins)
    • By A. J. Hartley, David Hewson
    • Narrated By Alan Cumming
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1247)
    Performance
    (1030)
    Story
    (1024)

    Macbeth: A Novel brings the intricacy and grit of the historical thriller to Shakespeare’s tale of political intrigue, treachery, and murder. In this full-length novel written exclusively for audio, authors A. J. Hartley and David Hewson rethink literature’s most infamous married couple, grounding them in a medieval Scotland whose military and political upheavals are as stark and dramatic as the landscape in which they are played.

    Beverly says: "Narrator choice inspired"
    "A Great Way to Learn This Story"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book is extremely well written by a couple of Shakespearean professors who really know what they are talking about. The story of Macbeth is relative simple, and these two brought it to life for me. I will read the Shakespeare play now that I am very familiar with the story. Although a tragedy, I enjoyed this book very much.

    The narration is also extremely well done and certainly added to the enjoyment of this book. I wish these authors and these narrators would do more of Shakespeare's stories.

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • The Boy in the Striped Pajamas

    • UNABRIDGED (4 hrs and 56 mins)
    • By John Boyne
    • Narrated By Michael Maloney
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (405)
    Performance
    (205)
    Story
    (205)

    The story of The Boy in the Striped Pajamas is very difficult to describe. Usually we give some information about the audiobook, but in this case we think that would spoil the listening. We think it's important that you start to listen without knowing what it is about.

    Jessica says: "Much Better than the Movie"
    "Everyone must read this book!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is one of those books you can't stop listening to until you are finished. It is powerful and heartbreaking and scary. There is layer after layer of meaning in this story, enough to keep a good book club going for a year at least. It is one I will be thinking about for a long time to come. At first I thought it was going to be a children's book, but it was soon evident that it wasn't the case. Yet, I'm not sure it is an adult book either. I guess it is just a book, a very profound and powerful book. It deals with concentration camps during WWII through the eyes of a 9 year-old German boy who lived just outside the camp fence. It is a very interesting point of view and a real eye-opener! Luckily it is a relatively short book so you can finish it in one or two sittings. Otherwise your life will have to go on hold until you finish it. Can't stop thinking about it.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • My Antonia

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 22 mins)
    • By Willa Cather
    • Narrated By Jeff Cummings, Ken Burns
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (380)
    Performance
    (193)
    Story
    (201)

    Through Jim Burden's endearing, smitten voice, we revisit the remarkable vicissitudes of immigrant life in the Nebraska heartland, with all its insistent bonds. Guiding the way are some of literature's most beguiling characters: the Russian brothers plagued by memories of a fateful sleigh ride, Antonia's desperately homesick father and self-indulgent mother, and the coy Lena Lingard. Holding the pastoral society's heart, of course, is the bewitching, free-spirited Antonia.

    Tammy says: "Enthralling!!"
    "Good book"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    "My Antonia" (emphasis on the "i") has been on my "to-read" list for a very long time. Oddly, I ended up with three versions of this book: Physical book, Kindle edition, and audio. I read all of them simultaneously. (I love doing that!) It is beautifully written by the great Willa Cather, and I understand it is very much autobiographical. Basically, it is the story of the Great Melting Pot, how foreign born families immigrated to the United States, specifically the Great Plains, and did their best to fit in, make a living, and give their children an opportunity that could not be had anywhere else in the world. It was not an easy life. These families left everything they knew, even their native languages, to come to the great unknown, with the promise of a better life. My own great-grandparents left Denmark in the late 1800s, in a similar time frame and reason as the people in this book, and brought their three young sons with them, boys who would never know their native land, or ever see it again. That takes guts, and these were gutsy people. Antonia was a strong, smart girl who grew up to raise a big family in the best way she knew how. I admire her.

    With all this said, it is not the most compelling book I have ever read. Yes, I cared about the characters, and was involved with their lives, but it is not a serious page turner. It is an easy read, and may be best read by a young adult. In my opinion, it is a good book, and has many elements that make it very worthwhile reading. I just don't think I would categorize it as great. The narrator of the audio book was good, but not great either. He was easy to listen to and did a good job of reading it, but I was always conscious of his reading. He didn't suck me into the story the way a really great narrator can.

    Bottom line: I really enjoyed it and would recommend it for anyone wanting to know more about pioneers, and how our country became "e pluribus unum."

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Kim

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 22 mins)
    • By Rudyard Kipling
    • Narrated By Madhav Sharma
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (77)
    Performance
    (51)
    Story
    (49)

    Set in the days of the British Raj, Kipling's finest novel is the exciting and touching tale of an Irish orphan-boy who has lived free in the streets of Lahore before setting out, with a Tibetan Lama, on a spiritual quest. Kim later enrols in the Indian Service and simultaneously embarks on an espionage mission of supreme importance.

    Carol says: "Fabulous Narrator"
    "It takes time and effort to understand"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    . . . But well worth it. First off, this is the narrator to listen to! I sampled all the narrators available, some being masters that I am well acquainted with, but none came close to Madhav Sharma. This is a performance to savor as he masterfully molds the story of "Kim" into everything Kipling set out to make of it.

    I sophomorically kept waiting for the big conflict, the big rift, the big disaster to really draw me into this book. About half way through, I realized none would come because this is a story about relationships, contrasts and coming of age. It is about trust and mistrust, love and loss, devotion and betrayal. It is not a story to speed through, but to be savored and thought about. I found myself listening and then relistening to many chapters, as I read along in the ebook (easily attainable for free). I could never have enjoyed just reading this book, in large part because of the strange names which I could never understand nor pronounce correctly, and also because of my total ignorance of the native inflections that Mr. Sharma so masterfully performed, and which gives so much meaning to the story. On the other hand, I could never have just listened to it because many of the words, being unfamiliar to me, could never have made sense to me no matter how well pronounced without my seeing them and in many cases, looking them up. Following along with the written word was the best of both worlds for me, and really helped with my understanding of the book.

    Beautifully written with a beautiful moral, no wonder it is a classic. I don't usually reread fiction, but I will probably read this one again.

    5 of 6 people found this review helpful
  • Follow the River

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 10 mins)
    • By James Alexander Thom
    • Narrated By David Drummond
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (306)
    Performance
    (258)
    Story
    (259)

    Mary Ingles was 23, happily married, and pregnant with her third child when Shawnee Indians invaded her peaceful Virginia settlement in 1755 and kidnapped her, leaving behind a bloody massacre. For months they held her captive. But nothing could imprison her spirit. With the rushing Ohio River as her guide, Mary Ingles walked one thousand miles through an untamed wilderness no white woman had ever seen.

    Marie says: "Amazing tale of survival"
    "Wow! Based on a true story."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Wow! What a story! I was completely caught up in this story for most of the book. I was a bit surprised to find, after I had read the whole thing, that this story is based on fact. That makes it all the more amazing. Mr. Thom did so much great research on this story and then put together a compelling work of fact fleshed out by his own imagination. He lost me a little bit when the character Mary climbed over mountains for several days in a row stark naked in freezing weather with no food. I kept thinking, "If it is so cold that a rock cannot be budged from the frozen ground, surely this naked woman cannot survive for more than several hours without any kind of shelter and no food for any kind of energy." But survive she did. I also found myself thinking that with a river running right by her and a whole forest on both sides, surely a woman as smart and resourceful as she was could figure out a way to find food, start a fire (although understandably she did not want to so she wouldn't be found) and make herself some kind of covering. But even with that inconsistency, I really enjoyed the story. **Semi-spoiler alert:** I do have to add that I understand why she left, but will never understand how she could leave her children. Perhaps she intended to go back after them, but that did not happen.

    6 of 7 people found this review helpful
  • A Big Little Life: A Memoir of a Joyful Dog Named Trixie

    • ABRIDGED (4 hrs and 13 mins)
    • By Dean Koontz
    • Narrated By Dean Koontz
    Overall
    (102)
    Performance
    (91)
    Story
    (94)

    In a profound, funny, and beautifully rendered portrait of a beloved companion, bestselling novelist Dean Koontz remembers the golden retriever who changed his life. A retired service dog, Trixie was three when Dean and his wife, Gerda, welcomed her into their home. She was superbly trained, but her greatest gifts couldn’t be taught: her keen intelligence, her innate joy, and an uncanny knack for living in the moment. Whether chasing a tennis ball or protecting those she loved, Trixie gave all she had to everything she did....

    Amazon Customer says: "A very good read"
    "A very good read"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    What can you say about a dog book? Especially if it is non-fiction but has all the elements of a good novel? I really enjoyed this book and getting to know Trixie. My only drawback is that maybe the Koontzes have gone a big too far, authoring books "by Trixie" and all that. Also, one statement that got to me was their asserting that no human child was loved more than they loved their dog. Now granted they never had children of their own so don't really have anything to compare it to, but that is a statement that is over the top. I have had children I love and I have had dogs that I love. If I had to make a choice, there would be no choice. Dogs can be trained to be much better behaved!

    Haha jk. As much as I have loved some pets, it comes nowhere close to the love of a parent for a child. But on the other hand, sometimes I think my dog Harley is my only friend. His loyalty to me is mind-boggling, and I am grateful to have him as a companion through thick and thin right now. It is always "thick" for the dog, even though I want to kick his little hairy fanny sometimes. If you are really a dog lover, look up a youtube video called "God and Dog" by Wendy J. Francisco. It sums up the human/canine relationship pretty well, and I always get choked up when I see it.

    Koontz reads his memoir himself, and does a great job of it.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Watchers

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By Dean Koontz
    • Narrated By J. Charles
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1814)
    Performance
    (1078)
    Story
    (1093)

    From a top-secret government laboratory come two genetically altered life forms. One is a magnificent dog of astonishing intelligence. The other, a hybrid monster of a brutally violent nature. And both are on the loose....

    Katie says: "Great book; so-so narrator"
    "Better than I first thought"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I ended up liking this book better than I thought I would. It seemed like it should have ended several chapters before it ended. At about that point, he lost me at "There was only one bullet left in the gun." Just too stock. I almost gave it up then, but kept going and I'm glad I did because it actually turned into a pretty good read. I found myself missing the characters once I had finished it. This isn't generally my kind of book, but I can see that for people who really like this genre, they might just love this one.

    5 of 6 people found this review helpful
  • When You Are Engulfed in Flames

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 3 mins)
    • By David Sedaris
    • Narrated By David Sedaris
    Overall
    (3926)
    Performance
    (1375)
    Story
    (1372)

    Once again, David Sedaris brings together a collection of essays so uproariously funny and profoundly moving that his legions of fans will fall for him all over again. He tests the limits of love when Hugh lances a boil from his backside, and pushes the boundaries of laziness when, finding the water shut off in his house in Normandy, he looks to the water in a vase of fresh cut flowers to fill the coffee machine.

    Kelley says: "Smokin'"
    "Sedaris is a very funny guy"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I think David Sedaris is extremely funny, and also a very deep thinker. He has a way of writing that both entertains and makes you think. He has absolutely no compunction, which I like, but sometimes he gets a little rank, and for me at least, crosses that line of what is in good taste and what just shouldn't be said. I forgave him of his imperfections a long time ago, not that it is my place or job to do that, but in my mind at least, I just accept him for what he is. And what he is is brilliant with human frailties, not so different from me. Minus the brilliant part. His books, which he narrates himself, are not for everyone so be advised if you are easily offended. But if you want some side-splitting laughs coupled with some very deep and meaningful writing, perhaps like me, you can look past the human aspect and into the heart of a great writer. There you will see much to be learned.

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

CANCEL

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.