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Roman

Saint-Petersburg, Russia | Member Since 2009

ratings
9
REVIEWS
9
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
1
HELPFUL VOTES
6

  • The Miracle: The Epic Story of Asia's Quest for Wealth

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 8 mins)
    • By Michael Schuman
    • Narrated By Fred Stella
    Overall
    (12)
    Performance
    (9)
    Story
    (9)

    Spanning nine countries, filled with heroic tales of bold decisions and self-sacrifice, and probing vast historical undercurrents, "The Miracle" takes readers inside private boardroom meetings, heated business negotiations, factory floors, and presidential cabinet sessions for a behind-the-scenes look at the events that shaped Asia's economic ascent - and will shape the world in the century to come.

    Roman says: "Packed with stories of both bussinesses and gov"
    "Packed with stories of both bussinesses and gov"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The book is a fascinating story of Asia development from the 1950s up until the present time. It describes both businesses and governments and then highlights the intricate connections (or power struggles) between them. It is well written and a pleasure to listen to and I learned a great deal. As an entrepreneur myself, I found the book encouraging.

    I read reviews on Amazon before buying this book. Some of them said the author was certainly biased and advocated government intervention over free market. I found no such thing in this book. In fact, the author presented a lot of facts, history and biographies and left it to the reader to judge. If anything, I felt like he was slightly more pro-market in his conclusions, but maybe that's a wrong a impression. The author does a good job of presenting every opinion there was and cites both pro-market and pro-government advocates.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Smuggler's Blues: The Saga of a Marjuana Importer

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 40 mins)
    • By Jay Carter Brown
    • Narrated By Gavin Hammon
    Overall
    (20)
    Performance
    (18)
    Story
    (18)

    Told from the viewpoint of an impressionable young entrepreneur named Jay Carter Brown, this memoir quickly dives into the gritty underbelly of the international drug trade. The story begins with minor-league smuggling scams between Canada and the Caribbean that soon escalate to multi-ton shipments of grass and hash from the Caribbean and the Middle East. All goes well for a time, but as the stakes grow higher, inevitable setbacks occur. Drug-runners, police, jealous friends, and rival gangs all contribute to this extraordinary story of a young man who became involved at the highest levels of the drug trade and lived to tell about it.

    Roman says: "Very entertaining and I learned a couple of things"
    "Very entertaining and I learned a couple of things"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I think for every curious mind out there it will be exciting to learn about the world the author describes. It is indeed a very interesting story. While not exactly linear, what I really enjoyed was the insight into all those different kinds of criminals that are out there, how they think and cooperate with each other. And, of course, the action of the operations itself is quite exciting too.

    Not only will you enjoy the story in this book, but you'll also get a couple of good insights and life advice as well. Would recommend to anyone.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Leading with Questions: How Leaders Find the Right Solutions by Knowing What to Ask

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 24 mins)
    • By Michael Marquardt
    • Narrated By Michael Marquardt
    Overall
    (38)
    Performance
    (19)
    Story
    (18)

    In Leading with Questions, internationally acclaimed management consultant Michael Marquardt shows how you can learn to ask the powerful questions that will generate short-term results and long-term learning and success. Throughout the book, he demonstrates how effective leaders use questions to encourage participation and teamwork, foster outside-the-box thinking, empower others, build relationships with customers, solve problems, and much more.

    Anshum says: "Less than impressive"
    "Couldn't finish, repetitive and lacks substance"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I was interested in buying this book because I love asking questions and wanted to learn more about how to ask the right ones. Nothing new here. This book is not worth the credit. It's highly repetitive and is based on a very shallow interviews of executives of companies that are not necessarily even successful (the author himself says he interviewed the ones who their colleagues thought were successful, not the market). All of the information that this book contains could be laid down in a blog post. The narration is fine, but it doesn't help.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Thinking, Fast and Slow

    • UNABRIDGED (20 hrs and 2 mins)
    • By Daniel Kahneman
    • Narrated By Patrick Egan
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2472)
    Performance
    (1930)
    Story
    (1914)

    The guru to the gurus at last shares his knowledge with the rest of us. Nobel laureate Daniel Kahneman's seminal studies in behavioral psychology, behavioral economics, and happiness studies have influenced numerous other authors, including Steven Pinker and Malcolm Gladwell. In Thinking, Fast and Slow, Kahneman at last offers his own, first book for the general public. It is a lucid and enlightening summary of his life's work. It will change the way you think about thinking. Two systems drive the way we think and make choices, Kahneman explains....

    Mike says: "Difficult Listen, but Probably a Great Read"
    "Not for listening, slightly boring, dispersed"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I think the author did an interesting job, but what I noticed is that he way too often refers to other's work that I already read about some other book (Invisible Gorilla, The Willpower Instinct). This made it slightly boring for me and it also made the books very dispersed on various subjects. Coupled with the fact that, as others said, he often refers to figures presented on the PDF, it made this book not a good match for an audio version. My final complaint is that I think it would be a great idea if the author stated right away in the beginning WHY his idea of two systems is so important and why should I finish reading this book.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • A History of the World in 6 Glasses

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 38 mins)
    • By Tom Standage
    • Narrated By Sean Runnette
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1375)
    Performance
    (1169)
    Story
    (1169)

    Throughout human history, certain drinks have done much more than just quench thirst. As Tom Standage relates with authority and charm, six of them have had a surprisingly pervasive influence on the course of history, becoming the defining drink during a pivotal historical period. A History of the World in 6 Glasses tells the story of humanity from the Stone Age to the 21st century through the lens of beer, wine, spirits, coffee, tea, and cola.

    Stoker says: "Fun and Informative"
    "Learned a lot about the history, great story"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The book is truly fascinating. Lot's of great facts about history, great storytelling and narration. Couldn't recommend more.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Debt: The First 5,000 Years

    • UNABRIDGED (17 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By David Graeber
    • Narrated By Grover Gardner
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (293)
    Performance
    (251)
    Story
    (252)

    Every economics textbook says the same thing: Money was invented to replace onerous and complicated barter systems - to relieve ancient people from having to haul their goods to market. The problem with this version of history? There’s not a shred of evidence to support it. Here anthropologist David Graeber presents a stunning reversal of conventional wisdom. He shows that for more than 5,000 years, since the beginnings of the first agrarian empires, humans have used elaborate credit systems to buy and sell goods - that is, long before the invention of coins or cash.

    E. J. Ford says: "Stands Economics on Its Head"
    "Very hard to see a clear line of the story"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    While I think this book could be interesting, and indeed I enjoyed some parts of it, I think the author fails to capture reader's attention with a clear line of events. He kind of like jumps from one epoch to another without explaining what does it all mean and how it correlates with his point of view. He also quotes a lot of sources which he then denounces, so especially while you are listening to the book, not reading it, it is hard to tell what the author actually thinks about the subject.

    The overall problem with the book, I believe, is that an author is an anthropologist and he's trying to get into the field of economics. I don't mean just his reasoning, which might be flawed - this should be left for economists to judge - but the way he tells the story: he's elaborating on some of the historical/cultural things too much and you just can't see what he was trying to say in the first place. Probably the reason I couldn't really finish the book.

    The narration is very good, although at some point I stumbled at a clearly "editorial" piece not supposed to be heard by the audience - the narrator was reading his remarks on the text. I guess you could call it a "bug". It was for a couple of minutes though.

    6 of 9 people found this review helpful
  • How to Start a Conversation and Make Friends: Revised and Updated

    • ABRIDGED (1 hr and 17 mins)
    • By Don Gabor
    • Narrated By Don Gabor
    Overall
    (18)
    Performance
    (15)
    Story
    (16)

    For more than 25 years, small-talk expert Don Gabor has helped thousands of people communicate with wit, confidence, and enthusiasm with his best seller How to Start a Conversation and Make Friends. This newly revised and updated edition combines classic techniques in the art of conversation with necessary skills for communicating in the 21st century.

    Guilherme says: "Simply just average. Don't expect too much here,"
    "Good info, useless chapters on online conversation"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    It's a nice little book with good info about how to construct conversations. I wouldn't say it gives you a full framework, but maybe a bit of a framework that is useful enough to boost your conversational skills, as well as some specific techniques to do so.

    One thing that I found useless is the part on online conversations/etiquette, those things are obvious. Maybe it's just me though, because it may have been targeted at the older generation who are not familiar with online communication very good.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • A Concise History of the Middle East, Ninth Edition

    • UNABRIDGED (18 hrs and 9 mins)
    • By Arthur Goldschmidt, Lawrence Davidson
    • Narrated By Tom Weiner
    Overall
    (291)
    Performance
    (187)
    Story
    (193)

    The ninth edition of this widely acclaimed text has been extensively revised to reflect the latest scholarship and the most recent events in the Middle East. As an introduction to the history of this turbulent region from the beginnings of Islam to the present day, the book is distinguished by its clear style, broad scope, and balanced treatment.

    Magnus Odeen says: "An honest, detailed and well written history"
    "A comprehensive history worth reading"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Many reviewers were dissatisfied with the book and the authors, who, they say, are biased. True, they might be a bit biased, but wouldn't you be, if you spent your life studying the middle east? I think the authors did a great job of gathering facts and telling an interesting story. The biased paragraphs are easily identifiable and, in fact, especially when describing arab-israeli conflict, I believe the authors made an effort to be very careful and sound as unbiased as possible. If you find the carefully ingrained opinions offensive and a reason good enough to discredit the whole material, then maybe the problem is with you, not the book.

    This book is history in the first place, not an opinionated essay. It also IS NOT about arab-israeli conflict only, it is about the history of the middle east. That said, whatever you political views are, reading this book would help you learn more interesting historical facts.

    0 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Guns, Germs and Steel: The Fate of Human Societies

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 20 mins)
    • By Jared Diamond
    • Narrated By Doug Ordunio
    Overall
    (852)
    Performance
    (660)
    Story
    (670)

    Having done field work in New Guinea for more than 30 years, Jared Diamond presents the geographical and ecological factors that have shaped the modern world. From the viewpoint of an evolutionary biologist, he highlights the broadest movements both literal and conceptual on every continent since the Ice Age, and examines societal advances such as writing, religion, government, and technology.

    Doug says: "Compelling pre-history and emergent history"
    "Some parts are boring, but still fascinating"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    In short, it tries to answer the question of why European culture and not culture from other parts of the world is dominating the world today.

    The book is fascinating, contains a lot of interesting facts and enlightens the reader with some of the great theories and explanations in linguistics, evolution, biology, anthropology and history. It may not be very detailed in answering certain questions, but it's a great starting point to investigate the subject you are interested in further. As other reviewers noted, it contains a boring part on botany which is really exhausting to listen to, but other than that it was interesting.

    The narrator was not perfect, chewing some words. Also the quality of the recording is not perfect with some white noise, but after a while you stop noticing that.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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