Customer Reviews | Audible.com
 

You no longer follow Virginia A

You will no longer see updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can re-follow a user if you change your mind.

OK

You now follow Virginia A

You will receive updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can unfollow a user if you change your mind.

OK

Virginia A

Pelham, AL, USA | Member Since 2003

31
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 11 reviews
  • 46 ratings
  • 426 titles in library
  • 0 purchased in 2014
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
2

  • A Letter of Mary

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 35 mins)
    • By Laurie R. King
    • Narrated By Jenny Sterlin
    Overall
    (679)
    Performance
    (364)
    Story
    (360)

    When an old archeologist friend gives Mary Russell a curled scrap of papyrus, Mary is startled to see that it is covered with Greek symbols. The writing may be a letter from an unknown - and female - apostle. Soon the old friend has been murdered, the Holmes' cottage has been ransacked, and Mary is faced with a particularly dangerous and painful investigation.

    Rod says: "Thoroughly enjoyable"
    "Listen for Holmes and Russell"
    Overall

    The mystery was not very compelling but I enjoyed the continuing maturation of the relationship between Holmes and Mary Russell.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • The Secret Life of the Grown-Up Brain: The Surprising Talents of the Middle-Aged Mind

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 52 mins)
    • By Barbara Strauch
    • Narrated By Nona Pipes
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (326)
    Performance
    (125)
    Story
    (127)

    A leading science writer examines how the brain's capacity reaches its peak in middle ageFor many years, scientists thought that the human brain simply decayed over time and its dying cells led to memory slips, fuzzy logic, negative thinking, and even depression.

    Virginia A says: "Recommended for all Ages"
    "Recommended for all Ages"
    Overall

    Since 2006 I have hosted the Brain Science Podcast, which has given me the opportunity to interview a wide variety of neuroscientists. While this book was written by a science journalist, not a scientist, I enjoyed the way she incorporated current research into a discussion of a subject that concerns almost everyone.

    Strauch points out that as we get older we tend to worry about why we forget the names of people we know (and those of people we just met) and we seem to be more easily distracted, BUT we fail to notice our mental strengths.

    In this book you will learn what the research shows about how for most of us, the gains outweigh the losses.

    I have recommended this book to all my listeners.

    Ginger Campbell, MD
    Creator and Host of the Brain Science Podcast

    19 of 19 people found this review helpful
  • The Coldest Winter: America and the Korean War

    • ABRIDGED (13 hrs and 53 mins)
    • By David Halberstam
    • Narrated By Edward Herrmann
    Overall
    (580)
    Performance
    (140)
    Story
    (139)

    Up until now, the Korean War has been the black hole of modern American history. The Coldest Winter changes that. Halberstam gives us a masterful narrative of the political decisions and miscalculations on both sides. He charts the disastrous path that led to the massive entry of Chinese forces near the Yalu, and that caught Douglas MacArthur and his soldiers by surprise. He provides astonishingly vivid and nuanced portraits of all the major figures.

    Doug says: "Almost as good as The Best and the Brightest"
    "A Must Read!"
    Overall

    I have been a fan of David Halberstam's since I read The Best and the Brightest as a young adult. I haven't read everything he wrote, but I think this may rank with "The Best and The Brightest," both for his reporting and for the importance of what he tell us.

    Not only is the Korean War a mystery to most Americans, Halberstam's book shows that there are valuable lessons to be learned by examining what happened, even though it was over 50 years ago.

    I think he deserves another Pulitzer, though I do not know if that award is ever given posthumously. The only thing wrong with this book is knowing that it was his last. (Halberstam was killed in an car accident only a few days after turning in the final manuscript.)

    Edward Hermann's reading was excellent, as always.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Children of Men

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 58 mins)
    • By P.D. James
    • Narrated By Julian Glover
    Overall
    (223)
    Performance
    (37)
    Story
    (38)

    The year 2021...no human babies have been born for a quarter of a century, not since Year Omega, anywhere in the inhabited world. The very old succumb to despair and suicide; the final generation of the young are beautiful, but violent and cruel. The middle-aged try to sustain normality under the absolute rule of Xan Lyppiatt, the charismatic dictator and Warden of England. Lyppiatt's cousin, Theo Faron, lives a solitary, self-regarding life in this ominous atmosphere.

    Janet says: "unlistenable"
    "Disappointing use of an interesting premise"
    Overall

    The world of this book is a world in which no human babies have been born in 25 years. Obviously, such a situation would have mostly devastating effects. James mostly looks a the psychological effects.

    The premise is interesting, though extremely hard to swallow, but the problem is that none of the characters, including the narrator and the young woman he falls in love with, are the least bit engaging.

    With a good audio book one may find oneself sitting in the driveway to listen to the end, but for this book I procrastinated listening to the last hour and finally had to force myself to finish. I won't give away the end, but I will say that it did not change my basically negative response.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Water for Elephants

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 26 mins)
    • By Sara Gruen
    • Narrated By David LeDoux, John Randolph Jones
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (12700)
    Performance
    (5162)
    Story
    (5224)

    Why we think it’s a great listen: Some books are meant to be read; others are meant to be heard – Water for Elephants falls into the second group, and is one of the best examples we have of how a powerful performance enhances a great story. Nonagenarian Jacob Jankowski reflects back on his wild and wondrous days with a circus. It's the Depression Era and Jacob, finding himself parentless and penniless, joins the Benzini Brothers Most Spectacular Show on Earth.

    Kindle Customer says: "Great Narration!!"
    "Memorable characters"
    Overall

    This was one of the most memorable novels I have read in the last few years.

    The narrator, Jacob, is “ninety or ninety-three” and lives in a nursing home. The arrival of the circus next store leads him to reflect on his experiences working on a circus during the depression. I have never been to the circus but Gruen makes the days when the circus was still a big event come to life.

    Several things make this story stand out. First, instead of the usual format where the elderly person only appears to introduce a flashback, in Water For Elephants, the story alternates between Jacob’s present life in the nursing home and his life as a young man in the circus. In the audio version, there are separate narrators for the younger Jacob and the older Jacob. This makes it easy to tell where you are and adds to the realism.

    At first I found myself wanting to get out of the nursing home and back to the circus, but by the end I cared as much about what was going to happen to the elderly Jacob and I did about learning the secret of his past. Even so, I thought the writing about the circus was especially powerful. Gruen’s ability to evoke the world of the depression-era circus reminded me of Ann Rice’s ability to make me feel that I am in New Orleans. She puts you in the menagerie with the animals, and Rosie, the elephant, is a character you won’t soon forget.

    Finally, there is a surprise at the end, which leaves you feeling happier than you expected.

    This is a relatively short book that I think anyone who loves animals will enjoy.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Ruins

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 39 mins)
    • By Scott Smith
    • Narrated By Patrick Wilson
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (546)
    Performance
    (80)
    Story
    (82)

    The Ruins follows two American couples enjoying a pleasant, lazy beach holiday together in Mexico. On an impulse, they go off with newfound friends in search of one of their group, the young German who, in pursuit of a girl, has headed for the remote Mayan ruins, site of a fabled archeological dig.

    Art says: "The Plant"
    "Tedious!"
    Overall

    Have you ever watched a bad movie to find out how it ended only to regret the decision?

    That is how I feel about The Ruins. It is possibly the worst book I have ever finished.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Can't Wait to Get to Heaven

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 51 mins)
    • By Fannie Flagg
    • Narrated By Cassandra Campbell
    Overall
    (261)
    Performance
    (71)
    Story
    (73)

    Life is the strangest thing. One minute, Mrs. Elner Shimfissle is up in her tree, picking figs, and the next thing she knows, she is off on an adventure she never dreamed of, running into people she never in a million years expected to meet.

    Miranda says: "Not her best work"
    "Whimisical but down-to-earth"
    Overall

    First, I think the narrator was great! After all the story is set in Missouri, not the South. Even so Campbell catches both the rhythm of Flagg's prose and essence of the characters speech.

    The story is not as sugar-coated as it might seem on the surface though it certainly lacks the bite of "Fried Green Tomatos" The character of Eliner is someone you wish you knew.

    I am not really a fan of mythical small towns but I enjoy Elmwood Springs because although Flagg moved her story north the town is southern through and through. This is glimpsed not only in the dialogue, but in the food and other aspects of daily life.

    I have lived near Flagg's hometown of Birmingham, Alabama for nearly 30 years and I enjoy the local tidbits that constantly crop up. My favorite in this book is Carraway Hospital. Also, as ER physician, I think she captures some of the contemporary stresses of medicine. These touches raise the book above a mere "It's a Wonderful Life" fairytale.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Ender's Game: Special 20th Anniversary Edition

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 57 mins)
    • By Orson Scott Card
    • Narrated By Stefan Rudnicki, Harlan Ellison, Gabrielle de Cuir
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (19967)
    Performance
    (11564)
    Story
    (11681)

    Why we think it’s a great listen: It’s easy to say that when it comes to sci-fi you either love it or you hate it. But with Ender’s Game, it seems to be you either love it or you love it.... The war with the Buggers has been raging for a hundred years, and the quest for the perfect general has been underway for almost as long. Enter Andrew "Ender" Wiggin, the result of decades of genetic experimentation.

    Kapila says: "6 titles in the series so far"
    "Even better the second time!"
    Overall

    I discovered the Ender Wiggin Saga several years ago when I checked out a multi-volume audio at the library. (I still don't know exactly how Children of the Mind ended because the last tape was damaged.) I went on to read the stories of Bean and Peter. I have never been disappointed.

    This reading is excellent. Besides the original narrator there are several voice actors for the various characters.

    My advice is that if you have never read this you should, but if you have read it, you will enloy this reading!

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Partly Cloudy Patriot

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 16 mins)
    • By Sarah Vowell
    • Narrated By Sarah Vowell, Conan O'Brien, Seth Green, and others
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1534)
    Performance
    (337)
    Story
    (337)

    Sarah Vowell travels through the American past and investigates the dusty, bumpy roads of her own life. Her essays confront a wide range of subjects, icons, and historical moments: Ike, Teddy Roosevelt, and Bill Clinton; Canadian Mounties and German Filmmakers; Tom Cruise and Buffy the Vampire Slayer; twins and nerds; the Gettysburg Address, the State of the Union, and George W. Bush's inauguration. The result is an engrossing audiobook, capturing Vowell's memorable wit and her keen social commentary.

    Erik says: "A great listen"
    "Great Fun!"
    Overall

    While its true that Sarah Vowel doesn't have a great radio voice, I don't think this matters at all. I enjoyed this book immensely.

    The first description that comes to mind is that she is the Annie Lammott of the Nerds.

    Most of the essays in this book are interesting but the two I enjoyed the most were the one about Gettysburg (because I had just finished Killer Angels) and the one about how Al Gore should have used Willow of Buffy the Vampire Slayer as a model for how to turn being a Nerd into an asset.

    Best of all, Vowel shows that one can be a liberal Democrat and passionate history buff, but still have a great sense of humor

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Killer Angels: A Novel of the Civil War

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 48 mins)
    • By Michael Shaara
    • Narrated By Stephen Hoye
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1030)
    Performance
    (468)
    Story
    (478)

    After 30 years and with three million copies in print, Michael Shaara's Pulitzer Prize-winning Civil War classic, The Killer Angels, remains as vivid and powerful as the day it was originally published.

    Gene says: "Almost a Perfect Audiobook"
    "Compelling!"
    Overall

    Even though I have an ancestor who was wounded at Gettysburg, I really didn't know much about the battle. This novel was written back in the 60's but has re-issued partly because Josh Whedon says it was the inspiration for Firefly/ Serenity. At least that is why I read it.

    First if was a compelling account of the battle told in the form of an historical novel, through the eyes of men on both sides. After reading it I feel an interest in the Civil War that I never had before.

    The narrator is wonderful. He captures accents as varied as those of Maine and Virginia. During the battle he uses emotion in his voice to capture the horror of the scene.

    All in all, I highly recommend this recording.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

CANCEL

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.