Call anytime(888) 283-5051
 

You no longer follow Nicholas

You will no longer see updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can re-follow a user if you change your mind.

OK

You now follow Nicholas

You will receive updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can unfollow a user if you change your mind.

OK

Nicholas

Comstock Park, Michigan, United States

ratings
6
REVIEWS
2
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
0
HELPFUL VOTES
0

  • Triplanetary: Lensman Series

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 57 mins)
    • By E. E. 'Doc' Smith
    • Narrated By Reed McColm
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (206)
    Performance
    (116)
    Story
    (117)

    From the atomic age in Atlantis to a world remote in space and time, two incredible ancient races, the Arisians and the Eddorians, are in the midst of an interstellar war - with Earth as the prize.

    James says: "Old Time Sci Fi at It's Best"
    "Historical Science Fiction"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The Lensman series is an important piece of historical science fiction. Many examples of modern day SF--from the epic Hyperion novels of Dan Smith to comics like the Green Lantern--pay homage, in part, to the Lensman series. Doctor Smith showed awesome imagination in his creation of the multiple races and worlds. I found it especially interesting to note that Triplanitary focuses on a racial breeding program that spans thousands of years. When considering this book was written in the 1930's, it is even more impressive.
    When reading Triplanitary, it is important to remember that this book was written during a different era. Men and women have roles which tend to horrify a person raised in the 21st century. Furthermore, Doctor Smith's love story within the book seems somewhat contrived and childish. Time, too, is something Doctor Smith seems not to fully grasp. In the span of a few hours, his characters are able to construct massive space ships and discover here-to-for unknown technology.

    Unfortunately, this audio book suffers most from a narrator that exaggerates the books weak love story. The narrator is adequate, but the characters he voices tend to sound the same and his women will make you cringe.


    Again, this book is important as an example of the development of the science fiction Genre. Though it suffers from weak characters and an implausible timeline, it stands out for it's originality. Sadly, the narrator let's the story down perhaps further than what it deserves.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The World of Poo

    • UNABRIDGED (2 hrs and 6 mins)
    • By Terry Pratchett
    • Narrated By Helen Atkinson-Wood
    Overall
    (73)
    Performance
    (65)
    Story
    (63)

    From Snuff: "Vimes looked at the cover. The title was The World of Poo. When his wife was out of eyeshot he carefully leafed through it. Well, okay, you had to accept that the world had moved on and these days’ fairy stories were probably not going to be about twinkly little things with wings. As he turned page after page, it dawned on him that whomever had written this book, they certainly knew what would make kids like Young Sam laugh until they were nearly sick. The bit about sailing down the river almost made him smile.

    Jacobus says: "Its about Pooh without an h, but with humor"
    "A Necessary Discworld Compendium"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The World of Poo is a necessary guidebook for any hopeful tourist to the Discworld. We follow young Jeffry as he travels to the bustling city of Ankh Morpork for the first time. Along the way, Jeffry discovers the amazing world of Poo in all it's many forms. We examine the poo of some of the Disc's most fascinating animals, from the elephants of Hawandaland to the Gargoyles of the great city. We even journey into Harry King's personal poo empire.


    The World of Poo is a creative piece of "children's literature" and draws upon many of the characters and places we are familiar with from other Discworld novels. Pratchett captures the viewpoint of a six-year-old boy who has a curiosity for poop... as do all little boys. Especially interesting is his description of the changing digestive system of the Ankh Morporkian gargoyles.

    One cannot help but wonder... what kind of poop does great Atuan produce?

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

CANCEL

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.