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Tim

My reviews are always pending.

United States | Member Since 2010

ratings
352
REVIEWS
348
FOLLOWING
11
FOLLOWERS
103
HELPFUL VOTES
633

  • The Return of the King: Book Three in the Lord of the Rings Trilogy

    • UNABRIDGED (18 hrs and 18 mins)
    • By J. R. R. Tolkien
    • Narrated By Rob Inglis
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2845)
    Performance
    (2561)
    Story
    (2614)

    The Return of the King is the towering climax to J. R. R. Tolkien’s trilogy that tells the saga of the hobbits of Middle-earth and the great War of the Rings. In this concluding volume, Frodo and Sam make a terrible journey to the heart of the Land of the Shadow in a final reckoning with the power of Sauron. In addition to narrating the prose passages, Rob Inglis sings the trilogy’s songs and poems a capella, using melodies composed by Inglis and Claudia Howard, the Recorded Books studio director.

    Natalie says: "Finally!"
    "Who Would Have Thought"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I never read Lord of the Rings when I was a teenager and kept putting it off. Even after I watched the movies, I had no interest at these books. The movies were okay and I saw no need to read the series. My friends kept telling me that I need to read these books and I would totally be a Hobbit.

    So, I finally took their advice and during Christmas season, I started with The Hobbit and before I knew it, I finished The Return of the King. It took me less than a month to finish all four books and I totally agree with my friends that its a classic fantasy.

    Reading The Return of the King was okay. My mind kept referring back to the movies. I didn't know after the novel ended, Tolkien wrote a group of essays and segments as a prequel to LOTR. It is included in the audio rite after The Return of the King ends and it is more interesting than the novels because it explains a lot and Hollywood has yet to exploit this story.

    A few years ago, I read the complete Harry Potter series and I dread each book more and more because it's childish and it's puberty writing from J. K. Rowling. If Audible ever gets the rights to the Potter series, I would consider buying all 7 books again, so I can voice my opinions by my reviews on how much I dislike Rowling's work.

    The difference from Tolkien is, his writing will always hold up to all ages and the books were published over half a century ago.

    I can now say that I read LOTR and enjoyed it.

    0 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Extreme Medicine: How Exploration Transformed Medicine in the Twentieth Century

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 37 mins)
    • By Kevin Fong
    • Narrated By Jonathan Cowley
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (23)
    Performance
    (18)
    Story
    (20)

    Little more than 100 years ago, maps of the world still boasted white space: places where no human had ever trod. Within a few short decades the most hostile of the world's environments had all been conquered. Likewise, in the 20th century, medicine transformed human life. Doctors took what was routinely fatal and made it survivable. As modernity brought us ever more into different kinds of extremes, doctors pushed the bounds of medical advances and human endurance. Extreme exploration challenged the body in ways that only the vanguard of science could answer.

    CHESTER says: "EXTREME MEDICINE"
    "Coming from a Family of Healers"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    My two younger siblings are both in the medical field. One is a physician and the other one is an anesthetists. We also have other family members are in the same line of work. When all of them get together, they like to talk shop until someone change the subject.

    "Extreme Medicine: How Exploration Transformed Medicine in the Twentieth Century" from Dr. Kevin Fong is interesting, but also a bit redundant because I pretty much heard it all from my family. The history of medicine and how the human body is so resilient is awesome to listen to, but "Exploration" of medicine is a bit hog wash. I don't quite understand what Dr. Fong is trying to prove.

    The cross reference of space exploration and medicine is a bit misleading. I don't see the link between the two when medicine is always evolving. We no longer use our bare hands to operate and microscopic surgery is becoming the norm. I guess what Dr. Fong is trying to say that without space exploration, the progress of medicine will be slower.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Pluto Files: The Rise and Fall of America's Favorite Planet

    • UNABRIDGED (4 hrs and 24 mins)
    • By Neil deGrasse Tyson
    • Narrated By Mirron Willis
    Overall
    (262)
    Performance
    (171)
    Story
    (171)

    In August 2006, the International Astronomical Union voted Pluto out of planethood. Far from the sun, tiny, and eccentric in orbit, it's a wonder Pluto has any fans. Yet during the mounting debate over Pluto's status, Americans rallied behind the extraterrestrial underdog.

    John says: "A Great Value"
    "Blog on Pluto"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I recently read Neil deGrasse Tyson's other book on Audible and found it fascinating. When I got the chance to buy "The Pluto Files" on sale, I was in joy. I find Dr. Tyson to be a genius. This book is more like a 4 hour lecture on why Pluto is not a planet. There is a lot of commentary from Tyson.and snippets of Pluto. If you are into astronomy, "The Pluto Files" is more like a personal blog from an astrophysicist.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs)
    • By Jonas Jonasson
    • Narrated By Steven Crossley
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1433)
    Performance
    (1272)
    Story
    (1291)

    After a long and eventful life, Allan Karlsson ends up in a nursing home, believing it to be his last stop. The only problem is that he's still in good health, and in one day, he turns 100. A big celebration is in the works, but Allan really isn't interested (and he'd like a bit more control over his vodka consumption). So he decides to escape. He climbs out the window in his slippers and embarks on a hilarious and entirely unexpected journey, involving, among other surprises, a suitcase stuffed with cash.

    Sylvia says: "Full of Surprises and Unexpected Events"
    "Nursery Rhymes for Grown Ups"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    "The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared" is a nursery rhymes for grown ups. Like Jack in the Beanstalk and an Old Woman Who Lived in a Shoe, that we heard in preschool, the 100 Year Old Man will be retold in a old folks home. I'm not sure if there is something missing from the Swedish version, but this book is a complete mess.

    Basically, it's about an old man jumping ship from a nursing home and start traveling the world and meeting people like Albert Einstein, Lyndon Johnson to Ronald Reagan and the North Korea dictator. None of this made sense. I almost stopped listening after the first half. Many reviewers compare this book to Forrest Gump, but I did not find 100 Year Old Man humerus. I have no interest at watching the movie either.

    Even after finishing the book, I'm not sure if the main character climbed out of the window and disappeared or just having a senior moment.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The War of the Worlds

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 59 mins)
    • By H. G. Wells
    • Narrated By Simon Vance
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (388)
    Performance
    (319)
    Story
    (322)

    First published by H. G. Wells in 1898, The War of the Worlds is the granddaddy of all alien invasion stories. The novel begins ominously, as the lone voice of a narrator intones, "No one would have believed in the last years of the 19th century that this world was being watched keenly and closely by intelligences greater than man's."

    Janice says: "Ants"
    "Sci Fi that Remakes Over and Over"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I've always thought Steven Spielberg's version of War of the Worlds was a bad remake from the original in 1953. The remake was just awful and I had no interest at reading the book until now. I have always pass up H. G. Wells "The War of the Worlds", because why read the book when every few years, they remake some version of the martian, alien, doomsday story, over and over.

    I'm one of those naysayer that favors the novel over the movie. In "The War of the Worlds", the book is a million times better than the movies, tv shows, and even the infamous radio drama. I can't put my big toe on it, but H. G. Wells wrote this book over a century ago and the book has this ageless science fiction that could had been written just yesterday or in the future.

    We always had this fascination of extra terrestrial landing on Earth and probing us in our butts, or aliens, invading the world and somehow with the help from a genius from scientist and out military, they save the day. Whatever is in the script, the story always remain the same from some adaptation of H. G. Wells.

    I would like to take this review a step further. "The War of the Worlds" has always been the premise of all comic books, action hero movies and certainly all science fiction. Before you think that my review is lame, just think about this. In most superheroes, some kind of foreign enemy comes down from the sky, causing mayhem to all. Magically, a superhero appear from the dust and all becomes well and the aliens either dies or go back to their planet and "until next time..."

    The analogy is always the same from Wells' book. Martians comes from Mars and the Narrator somehow figures out that the Martians are starting to die from a disease that humans are immune to. This is no different from any movie portraying the hero defending the universe.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Death by Black Hole: And Other Cosmic Quandaries

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 8 mins)
    • By Neil deGrasse Tyson
    • Narrated By Dion Graham
    Overall
    (1941)
    Performance
    (1127)
    Story
    (1129)

    Neil deGrasse Tyson has a talent for guiding readers through the mysteries of outer space with stunning clarity and almost childlike enthusiasm. This collection of his essays from Natural History magazine explores a myriad of cosmic topics. Tyson introduces us to the physics of black holes by explaining what would happen to our bodies if we fell into one; he also examines the needless friction between science and religion, and notes Earth's status as "an insignificantly small speck in the cosmos".

    Lind says: "Well written and well read"
    "TV Host, an Astrophysicist"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I ended up watching a revise version on Cosmos when it was on Fox. I've only seen a few episodes of the original with Carl Edward Sagan and was always amazed on how well he was able to explained space and life. I was a bit skeptical when I started to watch the new Cosmos with Neil deGrasse Tyson, but I was hooked from the very beginning. His style of explaining the universe is almost good as Sagan.

    After the series ended, I wanted to know more about Neil deGrasse Tyson. I found out that he is a famous astrophysicist and wrote many books on the subject. "Death by Black Hole" is a bunch of articles into a book that Tyson wrote and they are outstanding at explaining the unknown that are out of this world.

    Dr. Tyson has the same charisma as Dr. Sagan that you can listen to him for hours and always learn something new.

    This is a great introduction of astronomy and science. I will be reading more of Tyson's work.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Dragonfly in Amber

    • UNABRIDGED (39 hrs and 28 mins)
    • By Diana Gabaldon
    • Narrated By Davina Porter
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (9287)
    Performance
    (5933)
    Story
    (5951)

    New York Times best-selling author Diana Gabaldon enchanted scores of fans with Outlander, her electrifying historical saga set in 18th-century Scotland. Now this sequel sweeps listeners back into the past as Claire relates more of her perilous sojourn there with her Scottish warrior husband, James Fraser. Twenty years after her strange journey back in time, Claire has returned to Scotland with her daughter, determined to share with her the secret she has harbored since her time travel.

    Daniel says: "Finally! The unabridged version is here!"
    "Cumbersome Book"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I found that "Dragonfly in Amber" to be cumbersome to read. So many characters and not enough main points. I got lost somewhere in the middle and it was hard to get back on track again. Who is Brianna? She is the daughter of Claire and Jamie, but I found her character to be very dull and wanting to know even more.

    Davina Porter performance in book #2 is good, but not excellent. Her pace of reading the sequel is a bit irritating. I just wish that she would had read faster at a steady pace. If I'm going to continue on with this series, I really need to accept Porter's voice. She was awesome in the first book, but in "Dragonfly in Amber", she became a senior citizen trying to act in her twenty's.

    I'm really hoping as Claire becomes older in the series, the narration will be more suitable.

    The plot just shifted too much for me in this book. I hope that "Voyager" is more straight forward.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Bellwether

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By Connie Willis
    • Narrated By Kate Reading
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (606)
    Performance
    (332)
    Story
    (336)

    Sandra Foster studies fads and their meanings for the HiTek corporation. Bennett O'Reilly works with monkey group behavior and chaos theory for the same company. When the two are thrust together due to a misdelivered package and a run of seemingly bad luck, they find a joint project in a flock of sheep. But a series of setbacks and disappointments arise before they are able to find answers to their questions - with the unintended help of the errant, forgetful, and careless office assistant Flip.

    Pam says: "Pattern Recognition" Meets "Office Space"
    "No Laughs"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    "Bellwether" by Connie Willis didn't tickle my funny bone. I was disappointed that I didn't laugh at the numerous pop culture jokes from the 90's. I just didn't like it. The office setting reminded me too much of my day job dealing with my coworkers.

    The sheep is nothing new. If you want to read about sheep and science fiction, read The Android's Dream by John Scalzi. That book is cleverly written and much more laughable.

    Maybe it's just me, but I find that most pop culture references in books to be very dated.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Breakfast at Tiffany's

    • UNABRIDGED (2 hrs and 52 mins)
    • By Truman Capote
    • Narrated By Michael C. Hall
    Overall
    (731)
    Performance
    (673)
    Story
    (678)

    Golden Globe-winning actor Michael C. Hall (Dexter, Six Feet Under) performs Truman Capote's masterstroke about a young writer's charmed fascination with his unorthodox neighbor, the "American geisha" Holly Golightly. Holly - a World War II-era society girl in her late teens - survives via socialization, attending parties and restaurants with men from the wealthy upper class who also provide her with money and expensive gifts. Over the course of the novella, the seemingly shallow Holly slowly opens up to the curious protagonist.

    Michael says: "Subtle yet Extravagant"
    "Michael C. Hall has a Career"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Michael C. Hall has a career as an audiobook narrator. "Breakfast at Tiffany's" was a pleasure to listen to from the star of Dexter. He should narrate more titles. Maybe something darker and longer next time.

    As for the short story, I can't remembered if I seen the movie, but for $1.95 the book was good enough. I'm not going to analyze the social status of the main character because there are many other reviewers that dissect this story from Truman Capote.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and his Years of Pilgrimage

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 9 mins)
    • By Haruki Murakami, Philip Gabriel (translator)
    • Narrated By Bruce Locke
    Overall
    (52)
    Performance
    (48)
    Story
    (47)

    The new novel - a book that sold more than a million copies the first week it went on sale in Japan - from the internationally acclaimed author, his first since IQ84. Here he gives us the remarkable story of Tsukuru Tazaki, a young man haunted by a great loss; of dreams and nightmares that have unintended consequences for the world around us; and of a journey into the past that is necessary to mend the present. It is a story of love, friendship, and heartbreak for the ages.

    Darwin8u says: "Just below the Surface"
    "No Fake Accent"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I have to disagree with all of the negative reviews on Audible on the performance from Bruce Locke in "Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and his Years of Pilgrimage." I found his voice to be tolerable enough to finish the book. I would rather have his voice in my ears than an on screen actor piercing my eardrums with their fake Japanese accent. I don't understand why other reviewers are ranting about this so much. This was a decent recording of a great audiobook.

    As for Haruki Murakami and his latest attempt in "Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and his Years of Pilgrimage", I am very pleased with the entire story. If you can get over any homophobic tendencies that you may have, the story consist of wet dreams and reality.

    While some other reviewers has compare this book to Norwegian Wood, I see it in a different ballpark that Murakami played with. It reads more like a fouled up dream that you have been woken up to.

    "Did I really dream having a three some with another man and a girl?"

    I did not quite understand the whole deal with the Lexus dealership. That didn't make any sense to me. I also wished that Haruki Murakami would had elaborated more on the Death Token. I wanted to know more, but I have a feeling that the Death Token will reappear in the future.

    I bought this book as soon as it came out and very happy with the end result. I was excited that the book got translated and recorded into audio so quickly. I was jealous at my friend who can read Japanese when "Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and his Years of Pilgrimage" came out last year. She was right, I really enjoyed this one.

    I am a fan boy of Haruki Murakami. His style is so different from others. It's too bad that the publishers keep reissuing the same audiobooks over and over because my reviews for those titles are lost somewhere in Audible.

    Don't let this one slip by, base on bad reviews on the narrator.

    7 of 10 people found this review helpful
  • Outlander

    • UNABRIDGED (33 hrs and 8 mins)
    • By Diana Gabaldon
    • Narrated By Davina Porter
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (15853)
    Performance
    (10165)
    Story
    (10047)

    Why we think it’s a great listen: An all-time Audible favorite that mixes historic fiction, adventure, and romance with one of the most fascinating literary devices: time travel. Outlander introduces an exhilarating world of heroism and breathtaking thrills as one woman is torn between past and present, passion and love. In 1945, former combat nurse Claire Randall returns from World War II and joins her husband for a second honeymoon. But their blissful reunion is shattered....

    Lulu says: "The Reason for the Existence of Audio Books"
    "Romantic at Heart"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    When I was telling my friends that I started reading the "Outlander" series, some of them teased me by saying that I was romantic at heart. I wouldn't bought this book if Audible didn't have it as one of their Daily Deals, but now I want to read the complete series. Besides the sexy nurse and her man romance, the history section of the plot is very well written. I really enjoyed the time travel and the long epic drama of Outlander.

    When I first started the book, about 8 days ago, I wasn't too sure because the first few hours is something from Fan Fiction Theater, but after the sexual tension ceased a bit, I really got into the story. The time travel is a bit misleading. I'm still not sure how it works, but I can see why Diana Gabaldon has a lot of fans.

    The Outlander series is something that I want to take time to finish. Instead of gulping down cans of soda and feeling the burn in my throat, I want to sip through a straw and get enough to clench my thirst and enjoy the rest of the meal.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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