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Tim

Putting books on the back burner.

United States | Member Since 2011

792
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 400 reviews
  • 404 ratings
  • 933 titles in library
  • 19 purchased in 2015
FOLLOWING
13
FOLLOWERS
106

  • A Face in the Crowd

    • UNABRIDGED (1 hr and 19 mins)
    • By Stephen King, Stewart O'Nan
    • Narrated By Craig Wasson
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (236)
    Performance
    (219)
    Story
    (218)

    Dean Evers, an elderly widower, sits in front of the television with nothing better to do than waste his leftover evenings watching baseball. It’s Rays/Mariners, and David Price is breezing through the line-up. Suddenly, in a seat a few rows up beyond the batter, Evers sees the face of someone from decades past, someone who shouldn’t be at the ballgame, shouldn’t be on the planet. And so begins a parade of people from Evers’s past, all of them occupying that seat behind home plate. Until one day Dean Evers sees someone even eerier….

    Tim says: "Perfect Match"
    "Perfect Match"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    After listening all of Stephen King's books that have ever been published, I am still excited to read another title from SK, even if its just a very short story. As a SK's follower, the constant reader knows that King have a passion for baseball.

    I even read the "Faithful", about the Red Sox winning in 2004. It's not a surprise that he would write a story on the game, but what is surprising, that he had a co author for "A Face in the Crowd." Maybe because Stewart O'Nan was a co author of the "Faithful" also.

    It is a perfect match between the two authors because they are both die hard into baseball.

    Nevertheless, SK's novels and his novellas never gets old.

    Unless you are a huge Red Sox fan, skip "Faithful: Two Diehard Boston Red Sox Fans Chronicle the Historic 2004 Season", because its a baseball diary between Stephen King and his friends.

    As for "A Face in the Crowd", its a classic writing, short and demented.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • The Rape of Nanking

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 3 mins)
    • By Iris Chang
    • Narrated By Anna Fields
    Overall
    (293)
    Performance
    (148)
    Story
    (151)

    In December 1937, in the capital of China, one of the most brutal massacres in the long annals of wartime barbarity occurred. The Japanese army swept into the ancient city of Nanking and within weeks not only looted and burned the defenseless city but systematically raped, tortured and murdered more than 300,000 Chinese civilians. Amazingly, the story of this atrocity- one of the worst in world history- continues to be denied by the Japanese government.

    Douglas says: "Powerful"
    "Maybe Worst than the Holocaust"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    A good friend of mine suggested that I should read "The Rape of Nanking." Many times I get great reads from my friends, even though I may not be interested. We all have different taste and different options, but that is what is so great about reading. Between my friends and I, we have read almost all books on the Holocaust, but never on Nanking. I couldn't stop listening to this one.

    It's horrifying as heck what the Japanese soldiers did to the Chinese. I almost lost my lunch when I heard about the raping and torture in Nanking, but I couldn't stop listening.

    Iris Chang drove the subject matter in my brain, wanting me to read more and more. I never heard about Nanking until I bought this book.

    After reading "The Rape of Nanking", I understand why The Bird was so punishing with Louis Zamperini in Unbroken. Laura Hillenbrand never explained why the Japanese was so hard on their POW's. She never gave us an insight of their soldiers. Unbroken was all about Zamperini's life.

    Iris Chang shed some light on the culture and the mindset of the Japanese and the hatred of the Chinese during the massacre.

    As I kept reading, I was cross referencing in my mind between the two books and I understand why Zamperini went through hell in the prison camp. At that time, the Japanese had so much hate for all other races. In a way, Nanking was worst than the Holocaust simply because Adolf Hitler over shadow the world.

    Unlike the Jews, Nanking hasn't been retold from its survivors.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Girl on the Train: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 59 mins)
    • By Paula Hawkins
    • Narrated By Clare Corbett, Louise Brealey, India Fisher
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (16526)
    Performance
    (13771)
    Story
    (13764)

    Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She’s even started to feel like she knows them. "Jess and Jason," she calls them. Their life—as she sees it—is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost. And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel offers what she knows to the police, and becomes inextricably entwined in what happens next, as well as in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good? Compulsively readable, The Girl on the Train is an emotionally immersive, Hitchcockian thriller and an electrifying debut.

    L. O. Pardue says: ""Rear Window" Meets "Gone Girl""
    "What is the Hoopla"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Ever since "Gone Girl" there has been a surge of books with the word "Girl" in their titles. They all tries to mimic the best seller from Gillian Flynn. I don't like when I'm reading the synopsis of a book that they keep referring to another book from a different author. They are trying to ride on the coat tails from other authors' success.

    "The Girl on the Train" was very disappointing to me and I found it to be sluggish from the first word to its last. Base on my friends' recommendations, it wasn't a page turner for me. I found that the main character to not be intriguing at all and if I really wanted to listen to a drunk, divorce, middle age women (or men), I can entertain myself by going to weekly meetings at my local chapter.

    Maybe I miss Amy in "Gone Girl", but Rachel in "The Girl on the Train" wasn't so much of a mystery in my ears. It lacks in that psycho thriller that keeps you guessing at every page. I found the pace of the storytelling to be so slow. It barely held up to my attention. I did not care what happens next and how it ended. I just wanted to get to the end and move onto my next read.

    I really don't understand what is all the hoopla about over this book. I bought this book because of my friends and Audible kept showing the cover on their front page. Many of my friends has told me that they finish this book in a matter of days, so I was excited to start on it, but after the first few hours, I needed to force myself to listen.

    I really hope that the publishers will stop referring to Gillian Flynn's work, just because other authors' has a female character. It's getting really annoying and unnecessary.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Next America: Moving Beyond a Fragile Economy

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Don Holbrook
    • Narrated By Brian Daniel Young
    Overall
    (8)
    Performance
    (7)
    Story
    (7)

    The economic chaos that has created so much destruction of wealth for regular Americans is far from over. This book examines problems and possible solutions within national, international, and local realms that will help us navigate these times and set a course toward calmer waters. While some clamor for more taxes to cover our government's programs, The Next America shows how we can restructure our tax code so it positively affects all aspects of our communities.

    Tim says: "Talking Out of His Rear"
    "Talking Out of His Rear"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I'm not too keen on Don Holbrook's ideas in "The Next America." Some of his ideas are great, like regarding education, but most of his ideas are so far fetch that they will never come true. You can't rebuild America base on theories. There has to be action, reaction, and leadership and Don Holbrook is just talking out of his rear without any examples.

    I almost couldn't finish this one. At one point, I had to stop and listen to something else because Brian Daniel Young speaks in waves. He is the worst reader that I have yet to listen to. Avoid his voice as much as possible. His vocal folds is poison.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Revival: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 24 mins)
    • By Stephen King
    • Narrated By David Morse
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3050)
    Performance
    (2776)
    Story
    (2796)

    In a small New England town, over half a century ago, a shadow falls over a small boy playing with his toy soldiers. Jamie Morton looks up to see a striking man, the new minister. Charles Jacobs, along with his beautiful wife, will transform the local church. The men and boys are all a bit in love with Mrs. Jacobs; the women and girls feel the same about Reverend Jacobs - including Jamie’s mother and beloved sister, Claire. With Jamie, the Reverend shares a deeper bond based on a secret obsession.

    Thug4life says: "Not fit for a King"
    "An Epiphany on SK"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I purposely waited to read the newest one from Stephen King, "Revival." I wanted to wait for the fan fair to be over and give this book a chance. Many Constant Readers agrees that Stephen King is a much different writer than before. He hasn't wrote a gripping story since "11/22/63" and that was in 2011. All of his novels after that have been sub par at best where I don't consider myself as a Constant Reader anymore. He has become my least favorite author to follow.

    Before you find this review to be not helpful, please read on to my theory of the great King of horror.

    I really think that Stephen King is trying to make amends and perhaps throughout his recent books, he is writing an autobiography through his characters. Besides "On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft" and interviews, we know that SK had a problem with alcohol and drugs. He even say that he was high on booze and dope, when he wrote "Carrie."

    All of his characters has some kind of addiction and trying to find redemption. It's always the same pattern in most of this books, especially recently. Maybe that's why many of his fans has lost their faith in horror from the King.

    "Revival" follows the same pattern. Stephen King is trying to explain his past in the most arcaded way that I don't understand, but somehow it all fits. SK is trying to tell his life in pieces throughout his novels. The main character is also an drug addict and an musician. He meets a pastor that cure people through electricity and playing God. There is a dilemma from right or wrong and let's not forget the constant message from SK on smoking. Maybe the shadow is a metaphor from King's past.

    I was about to give this book a bad review because after time travel and JFK, Stephen King has been a total disappointment for many because all of his books has been lack luster before his horror days. After having an epiphany on why SK changed his style all of a sudden, I finally understand what he is doing.

    I will read more from Stephen King to see how he redeem himself from his vice.

    I hope that this review was helpful to the Constant Reader that miss the young author that freaked us through the night. Hopefully, he will have one last horror before he meet his maker.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution

    • UNABRIDGED (17 hrs and 28 mins)
    • By Walter Isaacson
    • Narrated By Dennis Boutsikaris
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1325)
    Performance
    (1140)
    Story
    (1128)

    Following his blockbuster biography of Steve Jobs, The Innovators is Walter Isaacson’s revealing story of the people who created the computer and the Internet. It is destined to be the standard history of the digital revolution and an indispensable guide to how innovation really happens. What were the talents that allowed certain inventors and entrepreneurs to turn their visionary ideas into disruptive realities? What led to their creative leaps? Why did some succeed and others fail?

    Mark says: "A History of the Ancient Geeks"
    "History of Bits and Bytes"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    "The Innovators" is a history book of bits and bytes of computing and the Internet. Walter Isaacson does an excellent job at explaining the technology and introducing the great founders such as Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Paul Allen, and many others. Also, the history goes into the first social network, The WELL. You don't have to know how to write code to enjoy this book. This author does not dwell on one subject over and over. He tells you the history of the person and their invention and then moves on to the next item. Over 50 years of computing in this book.

    I like to know how things work, like a diesel engine. Nothing is smoke and mirrors. There is always a process behind it. There are no hamsters running on a spinning wheel behind the curtain. Every line of code has a purpose. There is a reason why your cursor blinks and why your searches appears instantly before you type.

    "The Innovators" is an important book to my generation and the future. It is like our almanac, but instead of keeping track of the weather each year, we are always updating to the newest technology.

    I haven't read this good of a book on technology since I read "The Master Switch" by Tim Wu.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • A Quantum Murder: The Greg Mandel Trilogy, Book 2

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 52 mins)
    • By Peter F. Hamilton
    • Narrated By Toby Longworth
    Overall
    (637)
    Performance
    (562)
    Story
    (565)

    Dr Edward Kitchener, a brilliant researcher into quantum cosmology, lies dead with his lungs spread out on either side of his open chest. Only a mercenary or professional killer could have breached the premier-grade security system - but why would a professional waste time in ritual slaughter? Greg Mandel, psi-boosted ex-private eye, is enticed out of retirement to launch an investigation into a past which - according to Kitchener’s theories - might never have happened.

    Michael G. Kurilla says: "Excellent sci-fi murder mystery"
    "Great Combo of Sci-fi Murders"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Science fiction murder mystery makes a great combo when you have Peter F. Hamilton writing. "A Quantum Murder" is the second book in the Greg Mandel trilogy. I read the first book sometime last year and I have forgotten to continue on with the series. The first few chapters was confusing because I forgot all about the main character, who is a sci fi detective. There is less action in the second edition than in the first book, "Mindstar Rising."

    "A Quantum Murder" is better because Hamilton is known for his space opera. He goes more in depth into the high tech world and trying to solve the murder case. I need to write myself a reminder to finish the trilogy soon.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Working Stiff: Two Years, 262 Bodies, and the Making of a Medical Examiner

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 43 mins)
    • By Judy Melinek, MD, T. J. Mitchell
    • Narrated By Tanya Eby
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (564)
    Performance
    (504)
    Story
    (501)

    Just two months before the September 11 terrorist attacks, Dr. Judy Melinek began her training as a New York City forensic pathologist. With her husband and their toddler holding down the home front, Judy threw herself into the fascinating world of death investigation-performing autopsies, investigating death scenes, and counseling grieving relatives. Working Stiff chronicles Judy's two years of training, taking listeners behind the police tape of some of the most harrowing deaths in the Big Apple.

    R. Milam says: "Great story - but not for the faint of heart!"
    "262 Stories"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    262 stories of dead bodies from a Medical Examiner. Old age, suicides, murders and even malpractice cases, Dr. Judy Melinek has seen it all as a forensic pathologist. She was even there when the Towers fell and had to examined the incoming bodies from the terrorist's event.

    "Working Stiff" is her story about being a forensic pathologist in New York City. An real life CSI doctor, but without the lights, cameras, and bad scripts. Fascinating book on autopsies. Pretty wild how they can trace back the cause of death by examining the corpse.

    This book is not for the faint of heart, but Dr. Melinek explains her career thoroughly. I highly suggest to not to Google "dead corpse." The pictures are much more horrifying then this book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Football 101

    • UNABRIDGED (2 hrs and 24 mins)
    • By Gilbert Klein
    • Narrated By Jack Hicks
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (86)
    Performance
    (68)
    Story
    (66)

    This is an entertaining, informative beginner's guide to understanding football. Also, I guarantee* that this is the most enjoyable introductory audiobook ever about football, and that after listening to this audiobook you will know and love the game.

    Seth H. Wilson says: "A great introduction to football"
    "Yellow Flags"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    "Football 101" is kind of disappointing. I wanted to know more about the penalties in the game. Don't really care about the different positions because throw the ball, catch the ball, and run the ball. Football is actually a simple sport, but when the ref throws the yellow flag, the game gets confusing.

    Too much field talk and not enough about the rules. Unless you never watch football, you don't really need this guide book. The game is easy to follow if you have a favorite team. Just watch the game.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • My Early Life

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 39 mins)
    • By Winston Churchill
    • Narrated By Frederick Davidson
    Overall
    (134)
    Performance
    (115)
    Story
    (112)

    One of the classic volumes of autobiography, My Early Life is a lively and colourful account of a young man's quest for action, adventure and danger. Churchill's schooldays are undistinguished, but he is admitted to Sandhurst and embarks on a career as a soldier and a war correspondent, seeing action in Cuba, in India, in the Sudan - where he took part in the battle of Omdurman, of which he gives us a stirring account - and finally in South Africa.

    Janet H. Maddox says: "What an amazing life!"
    "What a Complainer"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    It was pretty awesome to hear about the early life of Winston Churchill. I'm a big fan of this great diplomat and have learned about him religiously when I was in school. He was one of the best speech writers of all time. When Churchill spoke, his voice rumbled through the air waves like no other. There hasn't been a leader with this great enthusiasm throughout our history like Winston Churchill.

    "My Early Life" is something that he wrote prior to World War II. Great sentence structure and great arguments for his time and you can see the outline shaping of his memorable speeches in this book. The man was a genus on how to get things in order.

    "My Early Life" is a blog on paper. Churchill needed to get things off his chest and what better way to do it than writing a book on his complains. When listening to this book, I was imagining Churchill, sitting down in my living room sofa, just ranting. I enjoyed every second of it. In my opinion, there is no one that delivers like Winston Churchill. The fury in his speeches are almost perfect.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Son

    • UNABRIDGED (17 hrs and 48 mins)
    • By Philipp Meyer
    • Narrated By Will Patton, Kate Mulgrew, Scott Shepherd, and others
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1559)
    Performance
    (1387)
    Story
    (1408)

    Part epic of Texas, part classic coming-of-age story, part unflinching portrait of the bloody price of power, The Son is an utterly transporting novel that maps the legacy of violence in the American West through the lives of the McCulloughs, an ambitious family as resilient and dangerous as the land they claim. Spring, 1849: Eli McCullough is 13 years old when a marauding band of Comanches takes him captive. Brave and clever, Eli quickly adapts to life among the Comanches, learning their ways and waging war against their enemies, including white men - which complicates his sense of loyalty and understanding of who he is.

    Mel says: "Five Stars for the Lone Star, The Son, & Meyer"
    "Black Gold"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    It's really hard for me to say that "The Son" is a modern classic. Cowboys, Indians, Texas, and Oil. There are three stories blended together and fails to explain about the McCulloughs'. While this book is worth reading, the plot is very disjointed. Every American Classic that I read have some kind of tragedy and hardship. "The Son" didn't really have neither. There is no epic sense of a mass story of pain and sorrow. It's pretty much how Texas turned into Black Gold.

    As a Western, I was expecting more bloodshed, but there were none. Maybe I missed the story in this book, but I was disappointed throughout the plot. Having five different narrators was very distracting and it felt like an over budget episode of Dallas. I was hoping "The Son" would been like Bonanza.

    There was no guns blazing in this Western.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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