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Tim

Putting books on the back burner.

United States | Member Since 2011

776
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 396 reviews
  • 400 ratings
  • 920 titles in library
  • 15 purchased in 2015
FOLLOWING
13
FOLLOWERS
105

  • Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 29 mins)
    • By Barbara Demick
    • Narrated By Karen White
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1717)
    Performance
    (1115)
    Story
    (1122)

    Barbara Demick's Nothing to Envy follows the lives of six North Koreans over fifteen years - a chaotic period that saw the death of Kim Il-sung and the unchallenged rise to power of his son, Kim Jong-il, and the devastation of a far-ranging famine that killed one-fifth of the population. Taking us into a landscape never before seen, Demick brings to life what it means to be an average Korean citizen, living under the most repressive totalitarian regime today.

    Gohar says: "The man who wants to be GOD"
    "Grandma Always Told Us"
    Overall

    My family is from South Korea. I am the first generation from the States. My grandma was from the Korea War era and she always told us story about North Korea. This book was very interesting. I learned so much. Thank you for the good rating for making me read this book.

    20 of 21 people found this review helpful
  • The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution

    • UNABRIDGED (17 hrs and 28 mins)
    • By Walter Isaacson
    • Narrated By Dennis Boutsikaris
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1071)
    Performance
    (932)
    Story
    (923)

    Following his blockbuster biography of Steve Jobs, The Innovators is Walter Isaacson’s revealing story of the people who created the computer and the Internet. It is destined to be the standard history of the digital revolution and an indispensable guide to how innovation really happens. What were the talents that allowed certain inventors and entrepreneurs to turn their visionary ideas into disruptive realities? What led to their creative leaps? Why did some succeed and others fail?

    Mark says: "A History of the Ancient Geeks"
    "History of Bits and Bytes"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    "The Innovators" is a history book of bits and bytes of computing and the Internet. Walter Isaacson does an excellent job at explaining the technology and introducing the great founders such as Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Paul Allen, and many others. Also, the history goes into the first social network, The WELL. You don't have to know how to write code to enjoy this book. This author does not dwell on one subject over and over. He tells you the history of the person and their invention and then moves on to the next item. Over 50 years of computing in this book.

    I like to know how things work, like a diesel engine. Nothing is smoke and mirrors. There is always a process behind it. There are no hamsters running on a spinning wheel behind the curtain. Every line of code has a purpose. There is a reason why your cursor blinks and why your searches appears instantly before you type.

    "The Innovators" is an important book to my generation and the future. It is like our almanac, but instead of keeping track of the weather each year, we are always updating to the newest technology.

    I haven't read this good of a book on technology since I read "The Master Switch" by Tim Wu.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • A Quantum Murder: The Greg Mandel Trilogy, Book 2

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 52 mins)
    • By Peter F. Hamilton
    • Narrated By Toby Longworth
    Overall
    (612)
    Performance
    (539)
    Story
    (542)

    Dr Edward Kitchener, a brilliant researcher into quantum cosmology, lies dead with his lungs spread out on either side of his open chest. Only a mercenary or professional killer could have breached the premier-grade security system - but why would a professional waste time in ritual slaughter? Greg Mandel, psi-boosted ex-private eye, is enticed out of retirement to launch an investigation into a past which - according to Kitchener’s theories - might never have happened.

    Michael G. Kurilla says: "Excellent sci-fi murder mystery"
    "Great Combo of Sci-fi Murders"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Science fiction murder mystery makes a great combo when you have Peter F. Hamilton writing. "A Quantum Murder" is the second book in the Greg Mandel trilogy. I read the first book sometime last year and I have forgotten to continue on with the series. The first few chapters was confusing because I forgot all about the main character, who is a sci fi detective. There is less action in the second edition than in the first book, "Mindstar Rising."

    "A Quantum Murder" is better because Hamilton is known for his space opera. He goes more in depth into the high tech world and trying to solve the murder case. I need to write myself a reminder to finish the trilogy soon.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Working Stiff: Two Years, 262 Bodies, and the Making of a Medical Examiner

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 43 mins)
    • By Judy Melinek, MD, T. J. Mitchell
    • Narrated By Tanya Eby
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (302)
    Performance
    (277)
    Story
    (275)

    Just two months before the September 11 terrorist attacks, Dr. Judy Melinek began her training as a New York City forensic pathologist. With her husband and their toddler holding down the home front, Judy threw herself into the fascinating world of death investigation-performing autopsies, investigating death scenes, and counseling grieving relatives. Working Stiff chronicles Judy's two years of training, taking listeners behind the police tape of some of the most harrowing deaths in the Big Apple.

    R. Milam says: "Great story - but not for the faint of heart!"
    "262 Stories"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    262 stories of dead bodies from a Medical Examiner. Old age, suicides, murders and even malpractice cases, Dr. Judy Melinek has seen it all as a forensic pathologist. She was even there when the Towers fell and had to examined the incoming bodies from the terrorist's event.

    "Working Stiff" is her story about being a forensic pathologist in New York City. An real life CSI doctor, but without the lights, cameras, and bad scripts. Fascinating book on autopsies. Pretty wild how they can trace back the cause of death by examining the corpse.

    This book is not for the faint of heart, but Dr. Melinek explains her career thoroughly. I highly suggest to not to Google "dead corpse." The pictures are much more horrifying then this book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Football 101

    • UNABRIDGED (2 hrs and 24 mins)
    • By Gilbert Klein
    • Narrated By Jack Hicks
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (64)
    Performance
    (52)
    Story
    (51)

    This is an entertaining, informative beginner's guide to understanding football. Also, I guarantee* that this is the most enjoyable introductory audiobook ever about football, and that after listening to this audiobook you will know and love the game.

    Seth H. Wilson says: "A great introduction to football"
    "Yellow Flags"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    "Football 101" is kind of disappointing. I wanted to know more about the penalties in the game. Don't really care about the different positions because throw the ball, catch the ball, and run the ball. Football is actually a simple sport, but when the ref throws the yellow flag, the game gets confusing.

    Too much field talk and not enough about the rules. Unless you never watch football, you don't really need this guide book. The game is easy to follow if you have a favorite team. Just watch the game.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • My Early Life

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 39 mins)
    • By Winston Churchill
    • Narrated By Frederick Davidson
    Overall
    (83)
    Performance
    (70)
    Story
    (67)

    One of the classic volumes of autobiography, My Early Life is a lively and colourful account of a young man's quest for action, adventure and danger. Churchill's schooldays are undistinguished, but he is admitted to Sandhurst and embarks on a career as a soldier and a war correspondent, seeing action in Cuba, in India, in the Sudan - where he took part in the battle of Omdurman, of which he gives us a stirring account - and finally in South Africa.

    Janet H. Maddox says: "What an amazing life!"
    "What a Complainer"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    It was pretty awesome to hear about the early life of Winston Churchill. I'm a big fan of this great diplomat and have learned about him religiously when I was in school. He was one of the best speech writers of all time. When Churchill spoke, his voice rumbled through the air waves like no other. There hasn't been a leader with this great enthusiasm throughout our history like Winston Churchill.

    "My Early Life" is something that he wrote prior to World War II. Great sentence structure and great arguments for his time and you can see the outline shaping of his memorable speeches in this book. The man was a genus on how to get things in order.

    "My Early Life" is a blog on paper. Churchill needed to get things off his chest and what better way to do it than writing a book on his complains. When listening to this book, I was imagining Churchill, sitting down in my living room sofa, just ranting. I enjoyed every second of it. In my opinion, there is no one that delivers like Winston Churchill. The fury in his speeches are almost perfect.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Son

    • UNABRIDGED (17 hrs and 48 mins)
    • By Philipp Meyer
    • Narrated By Will Patton, Kate Mulgrew, Scott Shepherd, and others
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1506)
    Performance
    (1341)
    Story
    (1362)

    Part epic of Texas, part classic coming-of-age story, part unflinching portrait of the bloody price of power, The Son is an utterly transporting novel that maps the legacy of violence in the American West through the lives of the McCulloughs, an ambitious family as resilient and dangerous as the land they claim. Spring, 1849: Eli McCullough is 13 years old when a marauding band of Comanches takes him captive. Brave and clever, Eli quickly adapts to life among the Comanches, learning their ways and waging war against their enemies, including white men - which complicates his sense of loyalty and understanding of who he is.

    Melinda says: "Five Stars for the Lone Star, The Son, & Meyer"
    "Black Gold"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    It's really hard for me to say that "The Son" is a modern classic. Cowboys, Indians, Texas, and Oil. There are three stories blended together and fails to explain about the McCulloughs'. While this book is worth reading, the plot is very disjointed. Every American Classic that I read have some kind of tragedy and hardship. "The Son" didn't really have neither. There is no epic sense of a mass story of pain and sorrow. It's pretty much how Texas turned into Black Gold.

    As a Western, I was expecting more bloodshed, but there were none. Maybe I missed the story in this book, but I was disappointed throughout the plot. Having five different narrators was very distracting and it felt like an over budget episode of Dallas. I was hoping "The Son" would been like Bonanza.

    There was no guns blazing in this Western.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • 1776

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 32 mins)
    • By David McCullough
    • Narrated By David McCullough
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (5181)
    Performance
    (2296)
    Story
    (2304)

    Why we think it’s a great listen: If you ever thought history was boring, David McCullough’s performance of his fascinating book will change your mind. In this stirring audiobook, McCullough tells the intensely human story of those who marched with General George Washington in the year of the Declaration of Independence, when the whole American cause was riding on their success.

    Mark says: "Front Seat on History"
    "Bought My Own Copy"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    A good friend of mine got me into audiobooks many years ago. He let me borrow his copy of "1776", the birth of United States. Ever since then, I've been fascinated with David McCullough and have listened to all of his books. He can do no wrong when he writes about history. This is my second time at listening to this book and it's like getting a front row seat in class, especially when David McCullough narrating his book.

    When Audible had "1776" on sale, I had to buy it to have it in my library. If my friend didn't lend me his copy of the audiobook, I would had ever had discover the best historian of all times. David McCullough is like a grandparent that you wish that you had because you can appreciate when they speak. The knowledge from this man is second to none.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Contact

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 42 mins)
    • By Carl Sagan
    • Narrated By Laurel Lefkow
    Overall
    (503)
    Performance
    (455)
    Story
    (460)

    The future is here...in an adventure of cosmic dimension. In December, 1999, a multinational team journeys out to the stars, to the most awesome encounter in human history. Who - or what - is out there? In Cosmos, Carl Sagan explained the universe. In Contact, he predicts its future - and our own.

    A. Ferguson says: "Great book, significant differences from the movie"
    "Segan's Life"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Carl Sagan is one of my childhood heroes. I remember being glued to the television when I first watched Cosmos. That show explained a lot about the universe and I wanted to know more. Maybe because of Carl Sagan, I started to like science fiction.

    I really think that Sagan wrote "Contact" to be understood from his naysayers. Although he was an Astronomer and a scientist, Sagan was deemed by most religious groups as an devil worshiper because he believed in evolution and because of his popular tv show, he was dismissed from the believers. I think he wrote his book to better explain himself as being an Atheist and more importantly there is life beyond Earth.

    If you read closely on this sci fi story, there are bits and pieces of Sagan's life and what he is trying to explain. He tries to explain that God is not man, but God is the universe.

    "Contact" is one of the most complex sci fi story that I have ever read because I want to know more on this author and a great man that left us too soon. His explanation of the Black Holes made sense to me to this day. I still go back and watch some of the old episodes and get chills on how wonderful teacher he once was.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Good Girl

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 38 mins)
    • By Mary Kubica
    • Narrated By Lindy Nettleton, Johnny Heller, Tom Taylorson, and others
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2300)
    Performance
    (1971)
    Story
    (1980)

    Born to a prominent Chicago judge and his stifled socialite wife, Mia Dennett moves against the grain as a young inner-city art teacher. One night, Mia enters a bar to meet her on-again, off-again boyfriend. But when he doesn't show, she unwisely leaves with an enigmatic stranger. With his smooth moves and modest wit, Colin Thatcher seems at first like a safe one-night stand. But following Colin home will turn out to be the worst mistake of Mia's life.

    Roger says: "Brilliant performances, moving story"
    "Two Comparisons"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I'm not too sure why "The Good Girl" is getting compare to "Gone Girl." The two stories are not similar to each other or from the same author. "The Good Girl" is not a sequel to the other book. I don't know why there are so many comparisons between the two.

    Mary Kubica's book is more like a hostage mystery. The main character who happens to be a female gets kidnap and the conversation between the two begins and there is always a twist. I don't think this book is in the right genre. There are no guns blazing, but it isn't a psychological thriller either.

    It's really hard to explain because after a while, you hope that the good girl will somehow stay with the bad guy.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Social: Why Our Brains Are Wired to Connect

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 17 mins)
    • By Matthew D. Lieberman
    • Narrated By Mike Chamberlain
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (118)
    Performance
    (95)
    Story
    (90)

    In Social, renowned psychologist Matthew Lieberman explores groundbreaking research in social neuroscience, revealing that our need to connect with other people is even more fundamental, more basic, than our need for food or shelter. Because of this, our brain uses its spare time to learn about the social world-other people and our relation to them.

    Douglas says: ""Bowling Alone" For Your Brain..."
    "Being Social"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Growing up with a disability, I always had a hard time being social no matter how many friends I had. I always felt like that I stuck out like a sore thumb. Ironically, I overcame my fears and more people knows me than I know them. At some point in my life, I became a rolling billboard for most people because of my unique ability to use my feet. I only have a handful of friends that I'm close with, and rooms full of names that I choose to not to know. I also choose not to have a social media status because I find posting to be counterproductive to the real thing. I don't need thousands of followers that I will never meet other than reading their texts.

    By the way, I don't Tweet, Posts and unless we met in real life and have a common interest, I don't Friend either.

    "Social: Why Our Brains are Wired to Connect," by Matthew Lieberman, is a remarkable study how our brain is wired at being social. Outstanding information how being social betters our society in every way. This book really hit home when he tries to explain that being social is like a smoker having two packs of cigarettes a day. Really interesting on human beings needs to be social and how the act of communicating can can teach, learn, and encourage others. There are many more examples from Lieberman and they are all well explain.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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