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Tim

Not a mainstream reader.

United States | Member Since 2010

612
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 336 reviews
  • 340 ratings
  • 1 titles in library
  • 71 purchased in 2014
FOLLOWING
9
FOLLOWERS
102

  • Poorly Made in China: An Insider's Account of the Tactics Behind China's Production Game

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 3 mins)
    • By Paul Midler
    • Narrated By Paul Midler
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (257)
    Performance
    (187)
    Story
    (189)

    It was a world gone wrong, one in which manufacturers thought little of manipulating product quality levels in order to save the smallest amounts, where savvy foreign business leaders were made to feel in control while they were taken for a ride by their partners, where entire manufacturing facilities sometimes vanished right into thin air... Welcome to Poorly Made in China!

    John says: "Hours of jaw dropping amazment"
    "Cutting Corners"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Unlike reading a feature article from WSJ on manufacturing in China and reading a commentary from an economist, you get a first hand look from Paul Midler doing business. I was afraid that it would be all about bashing the Chinese, but it's interesting on the cultural differences and the insightful views on what is going on in the factories.

    We cannot really blame the Chinese at cutting corners at making the products that we use. Just look at your bath towels and most likely it is made in China. Consumers wants lower cost in products and companies wants to maximize profit margins. Sadly, these objectives cannot be meet when it says, "Made in USA."

    As commodity prices rise, the Chinese has to charge according to meet their margins. They only have the upper hand when it comes to labor. People are like robots over there. If the worker is working too slow, they can replace them within seconds with another Chinese to fill the line and keep producing products.

    In the 80's South Korea was notorious of cheap goods and counterfeiting poorly made products, but look at them now. They are surpassing the Japanese in electronics and even in the automotive industry. "Made in China" will have a different stigma as the country progress. The Chinese can make good products, when companies are willing to pay for it, such as Apple. Like the old saying goes, "You get what you pay for." This is true in any business, not only in China.

    As China becomes more industrialized, this reading material will be a history of accuracy what the country used to be.

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Underground: The Tokyo Gas Attack and the Japanese Psyche

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 38 mins)
    • By Haruki Murakami
    • Narrated By Feodor Chin, Ian Anthony Dale, Janet Song
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (19)
    Performance
    (16)
    Story
    (16)

    From Haruki Murakami, internationally acclaimed author of The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle and Norwegian Wood, a work of literary journalism that is as fascinating as it is necessary, as provocative as it is profound.

    Tim says: "Bland Interviewer"
    "Bland Interviewer"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I really wanted to give high marks to Haruki Murakami for reporting the victims' stories about the Tokyo subway sarin attack in 1995, "Underground", but I almost couldn't listen to any of their stories anymore. I found that Haruki Murakami's reporting style to be very bland and boring. After a while there was too many of the victims' stories all bunch together, where I found it tiresome to listen to.

    As for the interviews of Aum Shinrikyo's members, it was interesting, but I preferred hearing from the victims instead. Maybe it's because the passive style of reporting from the Japanese culture or maybe Haruki Murakami is a really bad interviewer, but he should not write nonfiction anymore.

    He is awful as a reporter.

    This book just dragged on. I was really hoping to give at least three stars, but it's two stars at best.

    There is one compelling story that I liked the most. It was about the housewife when she found out that her husband was one of the casualties. Her in laws came by train to the hospital to see their dead son. The family got closer and life went on, but his daughter will never know her father.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Trustee from the Toolroom

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 31 mins)
    • By Nevil Shute
    • Narrated By Frank Muller
    Overall
    (486)
    Performance
    (432)
    Story
    (432)

    Keith Stewart, a retiring and ingenious engineer, could not have been happier in his little house in the shabby London suburb of Ealing. There he invented the mini-motor, the six-volt generator, and the tiny Congreve clock. Then a chain of events sweeps him into deep waters and leads him to his happiest discovery yet.

    Paula says: "Just Simply a Great Story!"
    "Good Neighbor"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    "Trustee from the Toolroom" is my first introduction of Nevil Shute. It's about an engineer going out to sea, to rescue his in laws that left for more prospect future. There is a lot more to the story, but that is the main plot. I really enjoyed Nevil Shute's writing. He wrote in a time where life was much simpler and neighbors helping each other.

    I don't think that this story could had been told by most authors today because we are being raise up in a different era. Instead of asking our neighbor if they can help us with a flat, we would rather call roadside assistance because out of convenience. The days where you talk to your neighbors are over.

    "Trustee from the Toolroom" is a humble story about a man that has a great adventure out in the sea, getting beckon to a rescue call and getting anchored on the promise land.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Terms of Enlistment

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 40 mins)
    • By Marko Kloos
    • Narrated By Luke Daniels
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (443)
    Performance
    (410)
    Story
    (406)

    The year is 2108, and the North American Commonwealth is bursting at the seams. For welfare rats like Andrew Grayson, there are only two ways out of the crime-ridden and filthy welfare tenements, where you’re restricted to 2,000 calories of badly flavored soy every day. You can hope to win the lottery and draw a ticket on a colony ship settling off-world, or you can join the service. With the colony lottery a pipe dream, Andrew chooses to enlist in the armed forces for a shot at real food, a retirement bonus, and maybe a ticket off Earth.

    DAVE says: "Solid military sci-fi."
    "Future Day Boot Camp"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Most of the reviews that I've read so far, "Terms of Enlistment" is supposed to be a science fiction military thrill ride, but other than the network and aliens, it's just another grunt story. Don't get me wrong, I enjoyed this book, but I don't really consider this to be science fiction. There is no real plot, just a lot of military jargon to be brave. More like future day boot camp in a revise version of Full Metal Jacket. Marko Kloos is an enjoyable author. I would read the next installment in the Frontlines series, but its not really sci fi. More like with high tech gadgets fighting the aliens.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Red Moon Rising: Sputnik and the Hidden Rivals That Ignited the Space Age

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 39 mins)
    • By Matthew Brzezinski
    • Narrated By Charles Stransky
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (371)
    Performance
    (204)
    Story
    (208)

    On October 4, 1957, a time of Cold War paranoia, the Soviet Union secretly launched the Earth's first artificial moon. No bigger than a basketball, the tiny satellite was powered by a car battery. Yet, for all its simplicity, Sputnik stunned the world.

    Thomas says: "awesome"
    "A Dud"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    There is no man in space in "Red Moon Rising." It's all about Soviet Union and United States and the race to space. It took me longer than I expected to finish this book. The information was interesting from a historical aspect, but it also became boring at times. Too much politics and not enough science to the rocket.

    The book should had taken me less than a day to finish, but I wasn't too excited to continue on, and I force myself to read more.

    It seems like that they lighted a match on a rocket to launch the satellite.

    This one was a dud.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Night Eternal: Book Three of the Strain Trilogy

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 54 mins)
    • By Guillermo Del Toro, Chuck Hogan
    • Narrated By Daniel Oreskes
    Overall
    (1070)
    Performance
    (959)
    Story
    (967)

    It’s been two years since the vampiric virus was unleashed in The Strain and the entire world now lies on the brink of annihilation. There has been a mass extermination of humans orchestrated by the Master - an ancient vampire possessed of unparalleled powers. The future of humankind lies in the hands of a ragtag band of freedom fighters - Dr. Eph Goodweather, Dr. Nora Martinez, Vasiliy Fet, and Mr. Quinlan, the half-breed offspring of the Master who is bent on revenge. It’s their job to overturn this devastating new world order.

    Melinda says: "When Good Ghouls Go Bad"
    "CW Episode of Vamps"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The last book in The Strain Trilogy is like watching an vampire episode on CW. I'm surprised that FX bought the rights to the show and not the frog network. Neediness to say, I was very disappointed in "The Night Eternal." It seems like that the series lost steam and just became another vampire story with a treasure hunt for the lost book. The dialogue didn't fit the action and I was hoping for a lot more.

    I really liked the first two installments from Guillermo Del Toro and Chuck Hogan, but the last passage was a complete let down with a bad ending. This could had been my summer read to break up the same books that I've been reading all year long, but I was disappointed in "The Night Eternal."

    It became somewhere in the middle of Anne Rice and Ayn Rand. Somewhat too Gothic and too much ideological nonsense.

    I couldn't handle neither of it. It's too bad because I really liked the beginning and the middle of The Strain Trilogy a lot, but the end did not hold up on its own.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Fall: Book Two of the Strain Trilogy

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 31 mins)
    • By Guillermo Del Toro, Chuck Hogan
    • Narrated By Daniel Oreskes
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1368)
    Performance
    (827)
    Story
    (830)

    Last week they invaded Manhattan. This week they will destroy the world. The vampiric virus unleashed in The Strain has taken over New York City. It is spreading and soon will envelop the globe. Amid the chaos, Eph Goodweather - head of the Centers for Disease Control's team - leads a band out to stop these bloodthirsty monsters. But it may be too late.

    James says: "The Bar is Raised"
    "Go for the Fillers"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Whenever I eat at buffets, I never go for the fillers. I always fill up my colon with the good stuff. I'm really digging the Strain Trilogy and the second book is better than the first. "The Fall" is a different story from the first book. Instead of being action pack, this book tell us more of the story, which I really like. It almost feels like a diversion from the main plot and getting you ready for the end.

    It gave me a break from the vampires, sucking up bloods and made my mind defer to somewhere else in their layers. Very complex beings and I cannot wait how it ends. I already bought the last book and debating if I should read something else to give myself a break, or just charge it. I think the reason why I like the second book better than the first because there is a slight side story of science fiction with the space station.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Strain

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 36 mins)
    • By Guillermo Del Toro, Chuck Hogan
    • Narrated By Ron Perlman
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2218)
    Performance
    (1150)
    Story
    (1161)

    The visionary creator of the Academy Award-winning Pan's Labyrinth and a Hammett Award-winning author bring their imaginations to this bold, epic novel about a horrifying battle between man and vampire that threatens all humanity. It is the first installment in a thrilling trilogy and an extraordinary international publishing event.

    Flavius says: "Hokey But Fun"
    "Hope FX doesn't Screws Up"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I decided to start on "The Strain Trilogy" because of much fan fair from my friends. I'm not into vampires because most of the books that I heard of are gear to teens and I'm not into blood sucking heartthrobs or underage girls with short skirts. No time to ruin my brain and I'm way past my puberty.

    Unlike other vampires that I heard of, the vamps in "The Strain" seems to be more real. Instead of teen vamps, these vampires are more like the terror in "Blade."

    Guillermo Del Toro and Chuck Hogan attempted a horror series that has yet to scare me, but I'm only through the first book. It didn't scare me per say, but I wanted know more about the vampires who drank the rats and how the CDC is getting involve.

    I don't see the vampires cohabiting with the humans, but in the first book so far, it hasn't been a blood bath either. The first scene of the book is pretty creepy and rad regarding the plane. That scene really caught my attention to read more.

    I just hope that FX doesn't screws up the show when it debut this summer.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 59 mins)
    • By Mary Roach
    • Narrated By Shelly Frasier
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3492)
    Performance
    (1971)
    Story
    (1986)

    For two thousand years, cadavers have been involved in science's boldest strides and weirdest undertakings. They've tested France's first guillotines, ridden the NASA Space Shuttle, been crucified in a Parisian laboratory to test the authenticity of the Shroud of Turin, and helped solve the mystery of TWA Flight 800. For every new surgical procedure, from heart transplants to gender reassignment surgery, cadavers have been there alongside surgeons, making history in their quiet way.

    Matthew says: "Darn funny if you're open to the idea."
    "That's how they prepared Grandma"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    When my grandma passed away, I was very sad, but when I was at her service and seeing her dead corpse in her casket, I was wondering how did they do that. This is not a joke. I'm not trying to be funny, but I always had this morbid fascination about the bodies after they pass. How do they get them so life like after they drain them? Ever since I went to "Bodies, The Exhibition", I thought that was the coolest thing that I have ever seen. People donating their bodies to be display for science..

    Mary Roach's approach in "Stiff" is an easy and light explanation on cadavers. It is funny and witty, but informational also on how the body is being preserved after they die for donors, funeral homes and etc. I'm slightly jealous that the author got to see the cremation process for her book.

    This book is certainly not for everyone. At some parts in the chapters, I had to pause because I was getting grossed out, but this book was all that I expected on how they prepared my grandma for her passing.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Last Battle

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 50 mins)
    • By Cornelius Ryan
    • Narrated By Simon Vance
    Overall
    (192)
    Performance
    (179)
    Story
    (180)

    The Battle for Berlin was the culminating struggle of World War II in the European theater. The last offensive against Hitler’s Third Reich, it devastated one of Europe’s historic capitals and marked the final defeat of Nazi Germany. It was also one of the war’s bloodiest and most pivotal battles, whose outcome would shape international politics for decades to come.

    A User says: "Thanks to Dan Carlin of Hardcore History podcasts."
    "Novice Expert"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Throughout my years at being an member of Audible, I have a fair amount of books on World War II in my library. Between my friends and I, we pretty much read everything on Hitler's regime and the battles that was won and lost. There is not too much out there that has already been told.

    "The Last Battle" by Cornelius Ryan was just okay. After reading so much on this war, there is very little new detail that interest me anymore. It was an important history of time that we should be more aware of, but the information is somewhat disjointed and already been told elsewhere.

    If you are looking for more in depth information on the Third Reich, read "The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich." That book rocks as far as what you need to know and what you should have known already. I just have to assume that most readers have yet to read William L. Shirer's book, because I don't agree most of the positive reviews for Cornelius Ryan.

    I wished that was more books out there about the people during this horrific period of time, other than the "Diary of Anne Frank." Just because I've studied this part of history so much, I didn't find "The Last Battle" that good. Read William L. Shirer instead. It has over 40 more hours of vast information on Hitler's dictatorship.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Consider the Fork: A History of How We Cook and Eat

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By Bee Wilson
    • Narrated By Alison Larkin
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (195)
    Performance
    (169)
    Story
    (171)

    Since prehistory, humans have braved the business ends of knives, scrapers, and mashers, all in the name of creating something delicious - or at least edible. In Consider the Fork, award-winning food writer and historian Bee Wilson traces the ancient lineage of our modern culinary tools, revealing the startling history of objects we often take for granted. Charting the evolution of technologies from the knife and fork to the gas range and the sous-vide cooker, Wilson offers unprecedented insights.

    Catherine says: "Intriguing history of everyday utensils"
    "Kitchen Anthropology"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    When I was reading "Consider the Fork", I truly thought that Bill Bryson was the author, but I needed to look back to the cover that Bee Wilson wrote this book about the kitchen and the tools that we use to eat and cook. This is one of my favorite informational books that I've read all year because not only she explains the utensils that we use to feed ourselves, but Wilson also went into the culture where it came from. It was like a kitchen anthropology and how the room revolved overtime. I wished that there was more audiobooks from Bee Wilson because I found her information to be really interesting and not overwhelming at all. This is not a cook book, but it's more like an encyclopedia on the most popular room in any homes.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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