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Tim

I write short and to the point reviews. No sense of dragging on in something that you like or hate.

United States | Member Since 2010

559
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 303 reviews
  • 307 ratings
  • 0 titles in library
  • 39 purchased in 2014
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FOLLOWERS
104

  • FDR's Folly: How Roosevelt and His New Deal Prolonged the Great Depression

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 26 mins)
    • By Jim Powell
    • Narrated By William Hughes
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (202)
    Performance
    (61)
    Story
    (62)

    In the minds of historians and the American public alike, Franklin Delano Roosevelt was one of our greatest presidents, not least because he supposedly saved America from the Great Depression. But as historian Jim Powell reveals in this groundbreaking book, Roosevelt's New Deal policies actually prolonged and exacerbated the economic disaster.

    David says: "Very Important"
    "FDR's Bloopers"
    Overall
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    Over the years I've learned a lot about the Great Depression, but I never read anything about FDR's bloopers and how he caused the economic fall. In our textbooks, the former President is a great man with a disability and Commander of Chief during WWII and the attack on Pearl Harbor, but he started the downhill spiral of the country.

    FDR ran the country like he was the Godfather of the mafia.

    Taxes, more regulations and programs like Social Security were some of his doings. Although these actions were good at the time, the country started the debt deficit in America because it wasn't well run by our president.

    We cannot blame FDR because all presidents have their mistakes.

    Just look at GWB and his eight years of follies and you will have volumes of books of the aftermath of his mistakes.

    1 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • The Troop

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 2 mins)
    • By Nick Cutter
    • Narrated By Corey Brill
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (142)
    Performance
    (137)
    Story
    (138)

    Once every year, Scoutmaster Tim Riggs leads a troop of boys into the Canadian wilderness for a weekend camping trip - a tradition as comforting and reliable as a good ghost story around a roaring bonfre. The boys are a tight-knit crew. There’s Kent, one of the most popular kids in school; Ephraim and Max, also well-liked and easygoing; then there’s Newt the nerd and Shelley the odd duck. For the most part, they all get along and are happy to be there - which makes Scoutmaster Tim’s job a little easier.

    Kim Venatries says: "Seriously Messed Up Gruesome Horror"
    "I Like Gross"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    When reading horror, I like to be scared and grossed out. I haven't read anything in this genre in a very long time. Most of the new horrors are too psychological and not enough gore. I like to read about cutting into flesh with full effects of horror. The Troop by Nick Cutter feels like a dated 80's horror book, like a summer camp gone wrong, but instead of Michael Meyers in the woods, slashing the campers, in "The Troop", we have tapeworms invading our bodies, turning us into worms. The graphic nature of this book is not so scary per say. It is more freaky than anything else. I really liked the terror and the descriptions of the worms and the gruesomeness. I was expecting camp fire stories that would spook you through the night, but I got a dietary pill that went horribly wrong by ingesting these worms that eats you inside out. The main plot of the story is a team of Scouts goes camping on an island and they are surrounded with these worms that were manufacture from the company. There is a lot more to the story, like trying to find spark plugs in a dead man's body to try to get off the island.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Double Helix: A Personal Account of the Discovery of the Structure of DNA

    • UNABRIDGED (4 hrs and 11 mins)
    • By James D. Watson
    • Narrated By Grover Gardner, Roger Clark
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (146)
    Performance
    (120)
    Story
    (121)

    By identifying the structure of DNA, the molecule of life, Francis Crick and James Watson revolutionized biochemistry and won themselves a Nobel Prize. At the time, Watson was only 24, a young scientist hungry to make his mark. His uncompromisingly honest account of the heady days of their thrilling sprint against other world-class researchers to solve one of science's greatest mysteries gives a dazzlingly clear picture of a world of brilliant scientists with great gifts, very human ambitions, and bitter rivalries.

    A. Lai says: "Fabulous book!"
    "No DNA Structure"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I was really hoping to learn more about DNA in "The Double Helix", but I think that I bought the wrong book. Instead how the genetic code works and the science behind it, this book is more about the personal account on how they discovered DNA. It's like reading about how Hewlett Packard started in their garage and not learning how they built the processor. It was interesting on how Francis Crick and James Watson discovered DNA, but most of the book was about their lives. I wanted to learned how they stumble upon the magic code by reading about their experiments, but it was about in having tea, meetings and who is getting published.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Kid: The Immortal Life of Ted Williams

    • UNABRIDGED (35 hrs and 13 mins)
    • By Ben Bradlee Jr.
    • Narrated By Dave Mallow
    Overall
    (12)
    Performance
    (11)
    Story
    (11)

    Williams was the best hitter in baseball history. His batting average of .406 in 1941 has not been topped since, and no player who has hit more than 500 home runs has a higher career batting average. Those totals would have been even higher if Williams had not left baseball for nearly five years in the prime of his career to serve as a Marine pilot in WWII and Korea.

    bob says: "The story of a great ball player and flawed man"
    "Beyond the Diamond"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    A friend of mine suggested that I should read about the legendary baseball player, Ted Williams. I'm not into the sport at all and reading about athletes or celebrities doesn't interest me. I'm not a media hound and can careless about stats, but reading about "The Kid" immediately caught my interest. I managed to finish the book in six days, while my friend has been pacing along for four months. Of course I'm getting the information in audio, but that is still over 35 hours of listening and paying attention.

    Ted Williams could be the most interesting man in the world besides being the best player in baseball. I pretty much fell asleep when Ben Bradlee Jr. laid out his baseball career and stats, but I was so interested in his life. Like how he fought in two wars and became a pilot in the Korean War. He was a very generous to strangers, charities, and especially kids with Cancer and forming the Jimmy Fund, but he was a bastard with his wives and children.

    His behavior is not uncommon with superstars even today. They treat strangers better than their own family, maybe it's a sense of pride or being in the public, but Ted Williams was a modest man when he gave so much to others in need.

    The death of Ted Williams is a weird story. Unlike his wishes, the family decided to freeze his head in a cryogenics lab. He is frozen in time and maybe the Kid will be back and will be teaching on how to play ball. Maybe we will see him on a phone application and his mind will still be coaching.

    At the end of his life, I couldn't help feeling sorry for the guy. His estate was ruin by his son, John Henry, which later died from leukemia. John Henry took advantage of his father's wealth and fame and tarnish his name, but like the great baseball player that his father once was, many fans will always see Ted Williams as "Splendid Splinter."

    I highly recommend this book, even for those who doesn't like baseball like myself.

    As another season of MLB just started, I wished that I was more involved with the sport, but I never had any interest in sitting through nine innings or keeping stats on my favorite player. I didn't even collect baseball cards when I was a kid, but I'm really glad that I read about Ted Williams way beyond the diamond.

    There is one major flaw in the audiobook. If you decide to download this book from Audible, you can't download the pdf companion. I've contacted Audible and Hachette Audio and they haven't resolved this issue yet. The audiobook does not reference back to the pdf file, but it would been nice to see what was missing.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Calculating God

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Robert J. Sawyer
    • Narrated By Jonathan Davis, Robert J. Sawyer
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1158)
    Performance
    (617)
    Story
    (626)

    In this Hugo-nominated novel, an alien walks into a museum and asks if he can see a paleontologist. But the arachnid ET hasn't come aboard a rowboat with the Pope and Stephen Hawking (although His Holiness does request an audience later). Landing at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, the spacefarer, Hollus, asks to compare notes on mass extinctions with resident dino-scientist Thomas Jericho.

    Ione says: "Interesting book, very enjoyable narration"
    "Intelligent Conversation with Aliens"
    Overall
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    I've always been a fan of reading science fiction because the universe is so grand with infinite topics to discover. The debate of creationism vs. evolution has always been a heated battle. There are too many emotions behind this topic where it becomes a yelling match. Robert J. Sawyer brought this controversy subject in a well written book in "Calculating God."

    Not to give any spoilers, but aliens has landed on Earth and one of them walks into a museum and starts to talk to a paleontologist. Their conversation is mostly about God and the Universe. The Extra Terrestrial believes in a higher power being and the scientist is an atheist and he is also dying from cancer.

    I really think the author is brilliant by combining the too topics together in an Intelligent conversation with aliens. It is a bit ironic that the ET believes that the universe was made from God and the human believes in cells and atoms, but it doesn't becomes a shouting match between their differences.

    Science fiction could be the only way to structure this debate in a well form topic.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By David Lochbaum, Edwin Lyman, Susan Stranahan, and others
    • Narrated By Jonathan Todd Ross
    Overall
    (12)
    Performance
    (12)
    Story
    (12)

    On March 11, 2011, an earthquake large enough to knock the earth from its axis sent a massive tsunami speeding toward the Japanese coast and the aging and vulnerable Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power reactors. Over the following weeks, the world watched in horror as a natural disaster became a man-made catastrophe: fail-safes failed, cooling systems shut down, nuclear rods melted.

    Tim says: "Commission Study on Nuclear"
    "Commission Study on Nuclear"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Reading about the Japanese earthquake in 2011 is like reading a commission study from the government on how to prepare. "Fukushima" is a technical read. If you want to know what happened to the people that lived near the power plant, then this book is not for you. There is no personal stories from local people, and their after effect at being exposed to radiation from the power plant.

    This book is very rigid by explaining the Japanese government and Tepco. Both parties were not prepared for the disaster. They still need more regulations in nuclear power plants.

    In the United States, we have been leaning toward to nuclear for our energy consumption. The disaster in Fukushima should be a warning for all of us that alternative energy should be develop before a using the source for a bomb.

    We still talk about Chernobyl as if it was headline news. There will be another book out on Fukushima and the people. As for my current read,I enjoyed the technical aspect of this disaster, but unless we get to hear from the citizens that are still fearing their life after the meltdown, this book is something from the government that no one will read, unless it happens to them and to us.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 18 mins)
    • By Michael Lewis
    • Narrated By Dylan Baker
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (348)
    Performance
    (319)
    Story
    (326)

    Michael Lewis returns to the financial world to give listeners a ringside seat as the biggest news story in years prepares to hit Wall Street....

    Darwin8u says: "Making the system deliver on its promise."
    "Lack of Thrills"
    Overall
    Performance
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    I'm a big fan of Michael Lewis. I've read most of his books on finance. Lewis always has a way at explaining about numbers, stocks, bonds, and mutual funds in a thrilling way. He makes real bankers into fable superstars in his books, while you learn how banking works. Maybe because Wall Street is all digital, I wasn't too interested in "Flash Boys." Maybe because we live in a digital world, the information about high frequency trading is just common knowledge.

    I wasn't too impress with the information that was presented in this book. Unlike his other titles, such as "Liar's Poker" (which I highly recommend if you want to learn about the stock market in the 1980's), "Flash Boys" just lacked in thrills. This book was like reading something from Popular Science and than forgetting about it because you cam get the same technology from Best Buy.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Winter is Coming: Symbols and Hidden Meanings in A Game of Thrones

    • UNABRIDGED (3 hrs and 27 mins)
    • By Valerie Estelle Frankel
    • Narrated By Oliver Wyman
    Overall
    (45)
    Performance
    (42)
    Story
    (40)

    Game of Thrones fans watch in delight as the epic battle of Lannister and Stark entangles the Seven Kingdoms. But only the sharpest notice how these houses echo Lancaster and York in the War of the Roses. Druids, Catholics, and even Zoroastrians wander through Westeros, reframing their religions for a new world of fantasy. But how medieval is Westeros? Did lady knights and pirates really battle across Europe? The audiobook Winter is Coming: Symbols and Hidden Meanings in A Game of Thrones explores all this and more, from the echoes of history to the symbols and omens our beloved characters.

    andrew says: "Good short listen, about GOT"
    "Cheat Sheet to AGOT"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    "Winter is Coming" is pretty much an overview for the first three season of "Game of Thrones" and a synopsis for the books for "A Song of Ice and Fire." There is nothing much that we don't know already. If you already caught up with the books and the show, you already know what is going on. This book is just speculation with no explanation. It's like reading the Cliff Notes instead of reading the book and you wonder why you failed on the term paper.

    4 of 6 people found this review helpful
  • The Puppet Masters

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 24 mins)
    • By Robert A. Heinlein
    • Narrated By Tom Weiner
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (362)
    Performance
    (200)
    Story
    (205)

    At key points throughout North America, an invasion force is taking over communications, government, industry, and people's bodies. And the nation is helpless to stop it, because the invaders multiply far faster than they can be destroyed, controlling the mind of every unsuspecting person they encounter. Enter Sam Cavanaugh, a can-do intelligence officer for the United States' most secret service. Cavanaugh is the only man who can stop the invaders. But to do that he'll have to be invaded himself.

    Mike From Mesa says: "An old favorite, but poorly narrated"
    "Not Dated"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Even over 60 years after Robert A. Heinlein published "The Puppet Master", I don't feel it is dated. I feel like it is something from a 1930's comic strip, but with science fiction. The story has this decor art feel to it. It's hard to explain, but I just imagine most of the characters wearing trench coats, fearing the slugs would get them, invading their brains. This book is a blast in the past and it shows Mr. Heinlein's imagination. At the time, he was born at the turn of the 20th century. The invention of instant coffee were being consumed and the radio was their form of entertainment. If this author was born today with the mainstream of our modern convenience this book would had been very different.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • With the Old Breed: At Peleliu and Okinawa

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 57 mins)
    • By E. B. Sledge
    • Narrated By Marc Vietor, Joe Mazzello, Tom Hanks
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (107)
    Performance
    (97)
    Story
    (100)

    The celebrated 2010 HBO miniseries The Pacific, winner of eight Emmy Awards, was based on two classic books about the War in the Pacific, Helmet for My Pillow and With The Old Breed. Audible Studios, in partnership with Playtone, the production company co-owned by Tom Hanks and Gary Goetzman, and creator of the award-winning HBO series Band of Brothers, John Adams, and The Pacific, as well as the HBO movie Game Change, has created new recordings of these memoirs, narrated by the stars of the miniseries.

    Corey says: "The best war memoir you will ever read."
    "War Diary"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Eugene B. Sledge's diary of the war is one of the best memoir that I've read in a long time, ever since Louis Zamperini and "Unbroken." In many ways, "With the Old Breed" is far better than Laura Hillenbrand's rendition of Zamperini's story because E. B. Sledge is not an author by trade. He is a soldier. Eugene took notes during the combat of the Pacific and later published his memoir.

    Instead of telling his story to a schooled prep writer that has little or no experience of war, Eugene wrote his own experience with his own words. It makes his book that much more creditable to read.

    As for the performance of Joseph Mazzello, (he played Sledge's character in the HBO miniseries of the Pacific), the first half of the read wasn't that good. I struggle through his pace of reading and found his voice to be very bland. Maybe someone gave a talk or a cup of coffee to Mazzello, but his performance becomes much more enjoyable in the second half.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature

    • UNABRIDGED (22 hrs and 44 mins)
    • By Steven Pinker
    • Narrated By Victor Bevine
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (634)
    Performance
    (306)
    Story
    (300)

    In The Blank Slate, Steven Pinker, one of the world's leading experts on language and the mind, explores the idea of human nature and its moral, emotional, and political colorings. With characteristic wit, lucidity, and insight, Pinker argues that the dogma that the mind has no innate traits, denies our common humanity and our individual preferences, replaces objective analyses of social problems with feel-good slogans, and distorts our understanding of politics, violence, parenting, and the arts.

    C. J. Hamilton says: "Instant classic"
    "Absorbing Like a Wet Paper Towel"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    There is something about Steven Pinker that I like. For the nonbelievers, his explanation of having a blank slate and the theory of human nature makes sense. I've been reading a lot of Dr. Pinker's books and lectures and most of his material relates to the human mind, violence, and our natural instincts and desires.

    As I read more of his work, I'm starting to believe that I am somewhat an atheist because a lot of his ideas are easy to absorb, like a wet paper towel. Even when I was in Sunday school, I didn't really drink the Kool Aid. I'm not saying that is neither bad or good, but for me, I always questioned.

    As for "The Blank Slate", so far this is my favorite book. It gives an overall view of the blank slate theory. Just enough to get your feet wet, but not overbearing with one topic and leave you with boredom.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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