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Fred

DaleTime

Mount Morris, NY, United States | Member Since 2010

8
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 2 reviews
  • 5 ratings
  • 157 titles in library
  • 21 purchased in 2014
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  • In the Still of the Night

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 58 mins)
    • By Ann Rule
    • Narrated By Barbara Caruso
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (77)
    Performance
    (58)
    Story
    (58)

    From true crime legend Ann Rules comes this riveting story of a young woman whose life ended too soon - and a determined mother’s crusade to clear her daughter’s name. Barb Thompson never for one moment believed her daughter committed suicide.

    Fred says: "Is the Glass Half Full or Half Empty?"
    "Is the Glass Half Full or Half Empty?"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Can I receive a half credit refund? I paid for a whole story and only got half, struggling through the 29 parts of this book only to arrive at the last part to listen to "Maybe this person murdered the victim, bur maybe it was that person." What's with that?

    I have read or listened to several of Ann Rule's books. I thought that Green River, Running Red was very well written. Ms. Rule cleverly switched back and forth between a narration of the victim's histories and a detailed biography of the killer. This device kept the reader engaged, telling bits and pieces of the killer's twisted background, while telling the sad stories of the many, many victims.

    This book plodded on, turgidly recounting over and over the greed and coldness of the victim's husband and presumed killer. Only toward the end did the focus shift, and I will not go there and spoil it for other potential readers. I read on, eagerly waiting to learn the killer's identity, judgment and punishment. But this was not to be. The book ended with speculation, plus a dark hint that Ms. Rule was in possession of information that she could not yet reveal.

    Other authors have had the integrity to abandon a project that could not be resolved. Ms. Rule should not have written this book, and I should get a half credit refund. :)

    8 of 8 people found this review helpful
  • The Poet

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By Michael Connelly
    • Narrated By Buck Schirner
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3765)
    Performance
    (2375)
    Story
    (2362)

    Our hero is Jack McEvoy, a Rocky Mountain News crime-beat reporter. As the story opens, Jack's twin brother, a Denver homicide detective, has just killed himself. Or so it seems. But when Jack begins to investigate the phenomenon of police suicides, a disturbing pattern emerges, and soon suspects that a serial murderer is at work.

    Tom says: "Is Connelly the Best Crime Writer Or What?"
    "Like a slow drip on my forehead"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

    A different narrator might have saved this book. Mr. Shimer's low, slow monotone is expressionless, and his female voices are awful..


    Has The Poet turned you off from other books in this genre?

    No, this is my favorite genre, when I can't find books about modern European history. I have read every other Michael Connelly book, and this one is the worst.


    How could the performance have been better?

    A different narrator, such as Len Cariou or Peter Giles.


    You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

    I am nine chapters in, and I haven't found one yet. This is like a Tom Clancy novel that gets going after about 400 pages. I will hang in a bit longer.


    Any additional comments?

    Michael Connelly's character, Jack McAvoy, is much more compelling and likeable in The Scarecrow. In that book, he is not as whiny as he is in The Poet. Ironically, it was the references to the Poet case in the Scarecrow that convinced me to buy the book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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