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Jaime

Bibliophile

Member Since 2010

39
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 28 reviews
  • 87 ratings
  • 832 titles in library
  • 76 purchased in 2014
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  • Torchwood: The Dead Line

    • UNABRIDGED (43 mins)
    • By Phil Ford
    • Narrated By John Barrowman, Eve Myles, Gareth David-Lloyd
    Overall
    (137)
    Performance
    (79)
    Story
    (81)

    When a Cardiff hospital is inundated with patients that have fallen into coma-like trances, Torchwood move in to investigate. They find that the trances were triggered by phone calls, all of which were made from a number that hadn't been active for over 30 years. Determined to find out who's been calling the unfortunate victims, Jack rings the mysterious number - two, zero, five, nine - nothing. It's a dead line. Until it calls Jack back, he answers - and falls into a deep trance...

    G. Grimsley says: "A missing Torchwood episode!"
    "Excellent"
    Overall

    Honestly, at times I wasn't sure if I was listening to an audiobook or the TV show. Incredibly well written and superbly dramatized by the original cast (always a pleasure). Sound effects and superb writing, not to mention voice acting, make it easy to picture the action almost as clearly as seeing it on screen. Highly recommended for all Torchwood fans - though some familiarity with the characters and basic premise of the show is necessary, as not a lot of time is spent explaining things.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Nobody

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 6 mins)
    • By Jennifer Lynn Barnes
    • Narrated By Casey Holloway
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (23)
    Performance
    (21)
    Story
    (21)

    There are people in this world who are Nobody. No one sees them. No one notices them. They live their lives under the radar, forgotten as soon as you turn away. That's why they make the perfect assassins. The Institute finds these people when they're young and takes them away for training. But an untrained Nobody is a threat to their organization. And threats must be eliminated. Sixteen-year-old Claire has been invisible her whole life, missed by the Institute's monitoring.

    Jaime says: "Mary Sue meets Gary Stu and ruins a good story"
    "Mary Sue meets Gary Stu and ruins a good story"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    What a disappointment. A fascinating premise, one worth exploration and fleshing out... and all the author can think to do with her story is have her sheltered-and-neglected Mary Sue angst over (and over and over and over) her damaged, heart-of-gold-past-of-pain Gary Stu. Long, long sections of the book are pretty much verbatim, all "I can't stay, I'll damage her," "I can't live without her," "I can't live without him," "he makes me feel normal," "poor, poor so-and-so, what a hard life they've led, let me make it better." Over and over and over. Halfway through the book - five and a half hours into a nine hour book, to be exact, finally, FINALLY some action looks to be taking place: they're thinking about (and always with the 'thinking' and the 'talking' - it's like no one ever told the author the old adage about 'show, don't tell') doing a raid on the institute...and they segue off into a date. A DATE. While they're being hunted and should be freaking out, and over more than just each other. Maybe it was a mistake to abandon the book when I did, but, honestly, my suspension of disbelief was shattered. If all you wanted to write was a teenage angst romance, leave the cool premises to someone else.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Bloody Jack

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 26 mins)
    • By L.A. Meyer
    • Narrated By Katherine Kellgren
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1613)
    Performance
    (1094)
    Story
    (1088)

    Life as a ship's boy aboard HMS Dolphin is a dream come true for Jacky Faber. Gone are the days of scavenging for food and fighting for survival on the streets of 18th-century London. Instead, Jacky is becoming a skilled and respected sailor as the crew pursues pirates on the high seas. There's only one problem: Jacky is a girl. And she will have to use every bit of her spirit, wit, and courage to keep the crew from discovering her secret.

    Terry says: "Sometimes it clicks"
    "Spectacular Narration"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is one of the few books I now can't imagine reading without this particular narrator. An already-swashbuckling story is only improved by the spot-on accent of a low class London girl, who gives the character voice without ever being overbearing about it. There are so many places where the voice of the narrator only enhances the words of the author, leaving me breathless with delight and unwilling to turn it off for any reason. Even more amazing (for me) is the fact that this narrator is a woman, as I usually find the female narrator high, breathy, and annoying. Not so here! Definitely worth a reread, and I'll be looking eagerly for the next series installment.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Woodcutter

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 45 mins)
    • By Kate Danley
    • Narrated By Sarah Coomes
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (209)
    Performance
    (196)
    Story
    (195)

    Deep within the Wood, a young woman lies dead. Not a mark on her body. No trace of her murderer. Only her chipped glass slippers hint at her identity. The Woodcutter, keeper of the peace between the Twelve Kingdoms of Man and the Realm of the Faerie, must find the maiden’s killer before others share her fate. Guided by the wind and aided by three charmed axes won from the River God, the Woodcutter begins his hunt, searching for clues in the whispering dominions of the enchanted unknown. But quickly he finds that one murdered maiden is not the only nefarious mystery afoot....

    Charles says: "Pointless."
    "A promising premise, but scattered in execution"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    As a reader, I don't really enjoy so-called "info dumps" where the writer tells you everything you need to know in one long go. As a writer, I know how hard it is to avoid info dumps, because there is so much the reader needs to know to properly appreciate the story. As a reader of THIS story, I wish that the writer had done MORE info dumping, or found a way to do the same thing. I got to the end and still wasn't sure what was supposed to have happened in the story I'd just read.

    The story is about a Woodcutter. He lives in the woods. He carries an axe. But he doesn't cut wood. Instead, he goes about interacting with a dozen-or-so different characters from different stories, tied together only by the presence of the Woodcutter. The author tries for a grand story-arc with a spectral hell hound and a dastardly plot by a one-dimensional villain who is only marginally involved with the story, but really, it reads more like a series of short stories all featuring the same protagonist. There are whole chapters where the first thrust of the book, the hell hound who sucks down people's souls, is forgotten, and the Woodcutter makes the current chapter's character's problems his one-and-only aim. Okay, I can get behind that. I enjoy fairy tales and this book had a unique spin on a couple of them, most notably Red Riding Hood and the presence of fey blood in the royal lines. What I didn't get was what happened at the end, when the author tried to take the dozen short stories and tie them up in a bow with a whizz-bang of a grand finale, that was over before it had scarcely begun. I'm still not exactly sure how the hell hound fits in, or which of the one-dimensional villains is the real villain, or even what their names are. The final exposition in which events are explained so that those of us who don't live in the Woodcutter's world can understand them is missing, which is doubly frustrating in audiobook format since one can't flip back through pages to connect the dots on one's own. And speaking of the Woodcutter's world... this is the situation in which an info dump would have been extremely helpful. There are references constantly made to 12 kingdoms (13 kingdoms by the end of the book, plus a duchy that wasn't part of the kingdoms. At least at first. Maybe it was by the end? That part was confusing). And yet, for all the many mentions of the 12 kingdoms, I still don't know anything about them, save that they have some sort of pact with the fairy realms. Why include twelve? Why not five? Or twenty? There is no logic imparted, no geography, no significance at all...save that they are mentioned often. It is frustrating in the highest degree to have a tantalizing world (and it is tantalizing, I would not be so upset with the book if the world weren't interesting enough to have whetted my appetite for it and then not followed through on the promises made), and not to get to see more of it than the tiny glimpses offered.

    The narrator was a confusing choice. Sarah Coomes does a good job, but, well... she's a woman. And the main character, the character whose point of view is all we see and whose voice is the one we hear while describing his adventures... is male. You see the problem. There are many, many excellent male narrators out there. Why choose a woman to be a man's voice?

    On the whole, promising, and a good read for a long road trip, one where you can listen all the way through in one go and maybe keep track of the characters that way, rather than go hours between listens and forget who each of the characters is supposed to be and why they're important.

    2 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • The Broken Sword

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 26 mins)
    • By Poul Anderson
    • Narrated By Bronson Pinchot
    Overall
    (88)
    Performance
    (74)
    Story
    (74)

    Thor has broken the sword Tyrfing so that it cannot strike at the roots of Yggdrasil, the tree that binds together earth, heaven, and hell. But now the mighty sword is needed again to save the elves in their war against the trolls, and only Skafloc, a human child kidnapped and raised by the elves, can hope to persuade Bölverk the ice-giant to make Tyrfing whole again. But Skafloc must also confront his shadow self, Valgard the changeling, who has taken his place in the world of men.

    Corey says: "Wow"
    "If you liked Beowulf..."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I started listening to this book and had to double check that it was, in fact, of modern composure (modern in this case being some sixty years or so, but still, more modern than 800 AD). It has the same sweep and feel of an ancient Epic, written and sung by bards, and in fact makes good use of alliteration and various techniques so that the prose feels more like poetry at times, an effect that is subtly highlighted by the talented performer. I rewound several times to relisten to descriptive swathes because the language and performance was so beautiful that I got lost in them. (And on the way to my car. I was so engrossed that I climbed two extra flights in the parking ramp and then couldn't figure out where my vehicle was. Oops...)

    But fear not, you who have not read the ancient epics! Though I have my own opinion of classics (favorable, read as many as you can, they really aren't that daunting), I know others find the prospect of an Epic a bit overwhelming. Don't. Really, don't. Things are easy to keep track of as long as you realize that troll = bad, elf = protagonist, humans = scapegoats, and gods = avoid at all costs if you hope to live a peaceful life. Not that peace is much to be had, because the bad mix it up with the protagonists, get the scapegoats involved, and the only hope of success comes with calling on the ones you hope to avoid.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Shadow of the Torturer: The Book of the New Sun, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 9 mins)
    • By Gene Wolfe
    • Narrated By Jonathan Davis
    Overall
    (802)
    Performance
    (502)
    Story
    (504)

    The Shadow of the Torturer is the first volume in the four-volume epic, the tale of a young Severian, an apprentice to the Guild of Torturers on the world called Urth, exiled for committing the ultimate sin of his profession - showing mercy towards his victim.

    Gene Wolfe's "The Book of the New Sun" is one of speculative fiction's most-honored series. In a 1998 poll, Locus Magazine rated the series behind only "The Lord of the Rings" and The Hobbit as the greatest fantasy work of all time.

    Ryan says: "great writing, won't appeal to everyone"
    "Why should I bother with the rest?"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Written in the passive voice, read in the passive voice, the writer never lets the reader forget the premise that this book is a narrative supposedly written by the main character years after the events being described. He apologizes for various side-tracks, and describes future events that "the reader is already no doubt aware of" - which, of course, the reader hasn't the slightest clue about. This robs the book of the power to make the reader gasp and fear for the life of the main character, as, of course, he has clearly survived. Additionally, into this admittedly otherwise-rich world building, clear references to technology and history that seems to hint that this world is merely a decayed and fallen earth are constant jarring-notes. I couldn't lose myself in the fantasy, because this tentative probing at both science-fiction and steam-punk constantly intruded, without having the decency to become either.

    Yes, there are curiosities, loose ends, that I would like to see wrapped up. Who is Vodalus? What makes him so bloody important? Who is Dorcas, and where did she come from? What the heck is so important about Sevarian's being a torturer - since for all the importance the author gives it, the main character could have been a member of any guild that did work found distasteful by others. Will I waste more credits on the rest of the tetralogy to find out?

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Leviathan

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 20 mins)
    • By Scott Westerfeld
    • Narrated By Alan Cumming
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1256)
    Performance
    (984)
    Story
    (989)

    It is the cusp of World War I, and all the European powers are arming up. The Austro-Hungarians and Germans have their Clankers, steam-driven iron machines loaded with guns and ammunition. The British Darwinists employ fabricated animals as their weaponry. The Leviathan is a living airship, the most formidable airbeast in the skies of Europe.

    Ryan says: "entertaining"
    "Bought it for the Narrator, then Bought the Rest"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I resisted buying any of the Leviathan books for years. Steampunk always seemed just too kitschy for my tastes. Then I saw that one of my all-time favourite narrators, Alan Cumming, had voiced the audiobook. I thought, 'okay, well, one can't hurt.' Ha. I forked over the cash for additional credits because I didn't have the patience to wait for a month to listen to the next two books in the series.

    Alan Cumming, as always, puts in an incredible performance. His natural Scots brogue gives life to Deryn Sharp, a girl disguised as a boy serving on the Darwinist air beast Leviathan, pride of the British Air Service. Just as easily, however, Mr Cumming switches to a German accent for the other main narrator, Alek, the Austro-Hungarian prince-in-exile. I'm not in a position to call it flawless (lacking the necessary ear for the language), but I certainly found it entirely believable. He even manages (in later books) to pull off a passable American accent, without going too far overboard, as is the wont of most Brits. But I digress. It is Mr Cumming's amazing vocal talents that truly bring this series to life. So much so that I couldn't imagine reading to books myself, not without his voice to waft me along in the telling. It is a rare narrator that can do that; I can't think of another one with that sort of compelling performance.

    Now, I DID say that I avoided the books on principle due to the genre, right? Yes, I will likely get hate mail for saying this, but steampunk, to me, always seemed to be trying too hard - 'what can I make even more complicated by tossing in a few gears?' Mr Westerfeld, I am pleased to say, mostly skirts all that, instead devising two amazing forms of 'technology' - Darwinist (which is to say, biological) and clanker (technological) - and then goes on to examine the natural divisions and strange unifications of these technologies, and applies geopolitical and historical understanding of the WWI era to the examination. It's not a book about the _technology_ (though it features prominently enough that some might be excused for thinking so), it's a book about history and humanity, seen through a radically different lens. If Mr Westerfeld should ever decide to write another book (or series!) set in this same world, my name will be at the top of the waiting list. I only regret that I waited so long to read it.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Demon in the Freezer

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 39 mins)
    • By Richard Preston
    • Narrated By Paul Boehmer
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (380)
    Performance
    (162)
    Story
    (160)

    "This book will give you nightmares," cautions The New York Times. Richard Preston takes us inside the ongoing war against bioterrorism, investigating the anthrax attacks of October 2001 and the potential for a future bio-attack using smallpox or, worse yet, a new superpox virus resistant to all vaccines. "As exciting as the best thrillers, yet scarier by far, for Preston's pages deal with clear, present and very real dangers," says Publishers Weekly.

    colleen says: "Interesting and eye opening"
    "Terrifying"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Really, terrifying is the only word for it. Super-bugs resurrected from the past, weaponized, and potentially in the hands of anybody?
    Other than that chill-factor, it's a spectacular read, interesting and informative, with enough of a mystery to keep one interested. As a medical professional, the description of the diseases were fascinating, though perhaps a bit grotesque. Definitely one that I'll be re-reading!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Trust Me, I'm Lying: Confessions of a Media Manipulator

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 29 mins)
    • By Ryan Holiday
    • Narrated By Ryan Holiday
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (347)
    Performance
    (312)
    Story
    (313)

    "You’ve seen it all before. A malicious online rumor costs a company millions. A political sideshow derails the national news cycle and destroys a candidate. Some product or celebrity zooms from total obscurity to viral sensation. What you don’t know is that someone is responsible for all this. Usually, someone like me. I’m a media manipulator. In a world where blogs control and distort the news, my job is to control blogs—as much as any one person can."

    Book Mogul says: "Trust me, it's worth the listen, and I'm not lying"
    "Makes you look at media in a whole different light"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I admit, I suspected that there was someone out there manipulating things, changing perceptions. What I hadn't realized was that that someone had a name, and that it occurs so pervasively. What little trust I had in media has been jaded, and any blind trust I had in the internet is gone for good. This book is a real eye-opener to the truths behind the curtain, so to speak. I'll definitely be looking at the news I get with a different eye: who benefits, how, and how did this story make it to the front page in the first place? I emerge from the book a cannier, hopefully wiser, and definitely changed reader.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • How to Train Your Dragon

    • UNABRIDGED (4 hrs and 20 mins)
    • By Cressida Cowell
    • Narrated By Gerard Doyle
    Overall
    (351)
    Performance
    (245)
    Story
    (245)

    Hiccup Horrendous Haddock III may be the son of the brave leader of the mighty Viking tribe the Hairy Hooligans, but he certainly doesn’t feel very heroic. When Hiccup and the other boys his age are challenged to pick baby dragons from the dragon nursery, Hiccup actually manages to catch a small one. But now how will he train his stubborn new pet?

    Susan says: "Not the same as the movie"
    "Cute"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Nothing like the movie, but then, you will have gotten that from all of the other reviews. Nevertheless, very cute and a good way to entertain the kiddies in the car - not necessarily in public, as the directions for how to train one's dragon is to "shout really loudly." Needless to say, some kids may take the directions a bit too literally.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Gate Thief: Mithermages, Book 2

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs)
    • By Orson Scott Card
    • Narrated By Stefan Rudnicki, Emily Rankin
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2340)
    Performance
    (2116)
    Story
    (2125)

    Here on Earth, Danny North is still in high school, yet he holds in his heart and mind all the stolen outselves of 13 centuries of gatemages. The Families still want to kill him if they can’t control him - and they can’t control him; he is far too powerful. On Westil, Wad is now nearly powerless - he lost everything to Danny in their struggle. Even if he can survive the revenge of his enemies, he must still somehow make peace with the Gatemage Daniel North, for when Danny took that power from Loki, he also took responsibility for the Great Gates.

    Benjamin says: "Flashes of Great, Ok, and Bad. Overall: Meh."
    "Looking Forward to More"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The team of Orson Scott Card and Stephan Rudnicki blasts another one out of the park with _The Gate Thief_. A richly layered world, an even richer background of history/myth/legend, and a tie-in with the real world that left my spine shivering. Card's ability to create realistic, believable characters is surpassed only by his ability to craft an exquisite story and world into which his characters can come to life and thrive. In this second installment into his Mithermages series, we learn more about the incredibly detailed mythos he has populated his story with: gate mages, man mages, demons, gods, and the one person who stands between them all: a sixteen year old boy who strives to be a good man, but faces the trials of any other adolescent kid, along with having to save two worlds AND deal with an overbearing family. Poor guy really can't catch a break. Let me also take a moment to say, I really like Danny's adherence to a moral code, despite the pressures of society, his own hormones, and several willing and attractive young women. Such strength is rarely found in fiction, and ought to be applauded.

    Also surprisingly, for me, one of the best parts of the book was the afterword, read by the author. He speaks of the difficulties inherent in crafting stories, especially stories with broad, sweeping arcs to them, and in speaking of his own troubles with this book (written and released late due to his need to extensively revise it), it gives amateur writers several key hints as to how to go about making the best novel possible. I'm looking forward with great anticipation to his next release.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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