You no longer follow Lulu

You will no longer see updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can re-follow a user if you change your mind.

OK

You now follow Lulu

You will receive updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can unfollow a user if you change your mind.

OK

Lulu

I ignore genre labels. Some of my favorite books are outside my genre comfort zone. Listening to audiobooks is still reading. Not theater.

ratings
1069
REVIEWS
200
FOLLOWING
1
FOLLOWERS
257
HELPFUL VOTES
1050

  • The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie: Highland Pleasures, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 53 mins)
    • By Jennifer Ashley
    • Narrated By Angela Dawe
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1717)
    Performance
    (1554)
    Story
    (1555)

    It was whispered all through London society that he was a murderer, that he'd spent his youth in an asylum and was not to be trusted - especially with a lady. Any woman caught in his presence was immediately ruined. Yet Beth found herself inexorably drawn to the Scottish lord whose hint of a brogue wrapped around her like silk and whose touch could draw her into a world of ecstasy.

    Lupdilup says: "FANTASTIC BOOK, NICELLY PERFORMED."
    "What a Fascinatingly Unique Hero"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The plot was typical Victorian romance. But the hero was fascinating. He was institutionalized most of his childhood, and today would have been labeled autistic. At the same time he was the classically good looking and brilliant hero. The heroine had a great sense of humor and chattered mindlessly whenever she was nervous. All of which was lost on the hero. Yet somehow they made the perfect couple. They made the book. Truly a joy to get to know. The narrator was OK. She handled the heroine well, but wasn't quite up to all the Scottish male characters.

    7 of 9 people found this review helpful
  • The Remedy: Robert Koch, Arthur Conan Doyle, and the Quest to Cure Tuberculosis

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 55 mins)
    • By Thomas Goetz
    • Narrated By Donald Corren
    Overall
    (210)
    Performance
    (190)
    Story
    (187)

    In 1875, tuberculosis was the deadliest disease in the world, accountable for a third of all deaths. A diagnosis of TB - often called consumption - was a death sentence. Then, in a triumph of medical science, a German doctor named Robert Koch deployed an unprecedented scientific rigor to discover the bacteria that caused TB. Koch soon embarked on a remedy - a remedy that would be his undoing. When Koch announced his cure for consumption, Arthur Conan Doyle, then a small-town doctor in England and sometime writer, went to Berlin to cover the event.

    William R. Toddmancillas says: "History plus."
    "An Awkward Marriage & Misleading Title"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    There are some very interesting side stories and anecdotes in Goetz's book. Especially about Conan Doyle. My love of Sherlock came late in life and I never paid much attention to his creator. That portion of the book made me want to read a full biography about the author.

    However, as I read this book it seemed that the author wanted to write biographies about both Koch and Conan Doyle, felt like he didn't have enough for two complete books so he looked for a tenuous thread between the two and tried to use that thread to cobble together one biographical book about two people. And to me, the thread just wasn't sufficient to tie these two stories into one cohesive book. It made the entire book feel false.

    Additionally, the title was inaccurate. Koch, who for all of his unpleasant personality traits and poor personal choices, evidently did contribute greatly to the science of medical research, didn't cure tuberculosis. He probably set the cause back several years. And while Conan-Doyle spent a few days in Germany viewing Koch's botched results and his wife died of tuberculosis several years later, he evidently had nothing to do with the "quest to cure tuberculosis."

    Most people who achieve greatness in life also fail miserably, at least once. The two go hand in hand. It seems to me that while Koch's ultimate dishonesty has to be considered in any well-rounded evaluation of the man, it pales in comparison to his accomplishments and should not be the centerpiece of a biography.

    And Conan Doyle dabbled in medicine while he struggled to be a writer. As soon as he met with success in his writing, he dropped medicine and never looked back. His interest in tuberculosis that prompted his visit to Germany had more to do with writing about the event than it ever had to do with questing to cure tuberculosis.

    So, two stories, both with merit, but they were artificially forced together in a single book, and both suffer because of it.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Erik Larson
    • Narrated By Scott Brick
    Overall
    (535)
    Performance
    (447)
    Story
    (455)

    On May 1, 1915, a luxury ocean liner as richly appointed as an English country house sailed out of New York, bound for Liverpool, carrying a record number of children and infants. The passengers were anxious. Germany had declared the seas around Britain to be a war zone, and for months, its U-boats had brought terror to the North Atlantic.

    Katherine Brown says: "Superb story teller"
    "No New Ground but Very Entertaining"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I may be one of the few people who didn't fall in love with Larson's book Devil in The White City. His writing style is a little too florid and wordy to me. However, since I read anything I can about World War 1, my issues with Larson's writing style wouldn't stop me from reading Dead Wake. And it is a book worth reading. Dead Wake tells the story of the sinking of the Lusitania, but that is really just the launching point of the book. Larson interweaves other key events and people into the narrative so the reader gets a good overview of the British Intelligence system, especially its code breaking department, the German and British navy's, especially the German U-Boat program, the operation of one of the largest businesses of the period, the Cunard Lines and more importantly the individuals intimately involved in the fate of the Lusitania, not just those on the boat, the crew and the passengers, but also the captain of the U-Boat who fired the torpedo that sunk the ship. He brought detail to at least a couple dozen passengers and crew members, some who survived and some who didn't. People who were never famous and are largely unknown by now. Because so much of the book dealt with the minutia of people's lives, I thought his writing style was better suited to this subject.

    He also dealt with the Wilson administration and Wilson's appalling immaturity and naivete far more sympathetically than other contemporary authors. If anything, his generally positive handling of Wilson, was about the only thing that rang untrue.

    I listened to this book and while Scott Brick is a prolific narrator and I regularly listen to and enjoy his narration style, I found his narration of this book a little too dramatic. he tried to infuse the narrative with a little too much emotion and drama for my taste. Regardless, it is still a book worth listening to. And it seemed to go very fast.

    I heartily recommend this book.




    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Descartes' Bones: A Skeletal History of the Conflict between Faith and Reason

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 13 mins)
    • By Russell Shorto
    • Narrated By Paul Hecht
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (199)
    Performance
    (67)
    Story
    (64)

    On a brutal winter's day in 1650 in Stockholm, Frenchman Rene Descartes, the most influential and controversial thinker of his time, was buried after a cold and lonely deathfar from home. Sixteen years later, the pious French Ambassador Hugues de Terlon secretly unearthed Descartes' bones and transported them to France. Why would this devoutly Catholic official care so much about the remains of a philosopher who washounded from country after country on charges of atheism?

    Roger says: "Philosophy of Modernity"
    "Perhaps I Expected Too Much"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I was feeling pretty good after I finished the book "The Swerve" so decided to tackle another book that had long been on my TBR stack that dealt with essentially the same time period and the same dawn of modernity.

    Russell Shorto also wrote "The Island at the Center of the World" about the Dutch new world settlement New Netherland. It remains one of my favorite historical books regarding that time frame. It was well written and extremely readable. So I had high hopes for "Descartes' Bones."

    Unfortunately I was disappointed. The book was well written, but while I understand how important a figure Descartes was both at the launch of the modern period but also today, that really wasn't what the book was about. Rather, it was about the circuitous route Descartes skull took when it was separated from his body after his death. I think the goal was to use the skull, and actually his entire skeleton as symbols for the radical ideas Descartes proposed and by understanding people's reactions to the skull and skeleton we could understand their reaction to those ideas. Unfortunately that didn't work for me. I appreciate that his remains became relic-ized, mirroring what the church had long done with purported saints bones, but to me that has never been an admirable or interesting practice and in this case, it had little to do with Descartes thoughts and ideas and those are what was important.

    If you want to read a piece of non-fiction dealing with the dawn of modernity, I recommend "The Swerve" over "Descartes Bones." Russell Shorto is a very good writer, but the topic itself was uninteresting and it fell far short of convincing me that the fate of Descartes skeleton and skull was anything I should remotely care about.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Swerve: How the World Became Modern

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 44 mins)
    • By Stephen Greenblatt
    • Narrated By Edoardo Ballerini
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1159)
    Performance
    (1007)
    Story
    (1001)

    Nearly six hundred years ago, a short, genial, cannily alert man in his late 30s took a very old manuscript off a library shelf, saw with excitement what he had discovered, and ordered that it be copied. That book was the last surviving manuscript of an ancient Roman philosophical epic by Lucretius—a beautiful poem containing the most dangerous ideas: that the universe functioned without the aid of gods, that religious fear was damaging to human life, and that matter was made up of very small particles.

    Ethan M. says: "Very compelling history, a less compelling thesis"
    "Fascinating Story - Amazing Narration"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I purchased this book quite some time ago. I started to read it then, but put it aside because at the time I wasn't up for the level of attention it clearly required. I recently picked it up and this time I made it through. I am very glad I did.

    The focus of the book is on the rediscovery of an ancient poem "On the Nature of Things" by Lucretius, and the impact that rediscovery had on the swerve towards modernity and the beginning of the Renaissance. The poem, which stems from the author's devotion to the beliefs and ideals of Epicurianism, was written almost 2100 years ago and was rediscovered by a priest on a mission almost 600 years ago.

    I admit I have never made it through an entire translation of "On the Nature of Things" and since I don't read classical Latin I will never tackle the original. But I have read substantial portions and have found them both lyrical, perceptive and surprisingly modern. I was interested in learning about how the poem was viewed within the context of the time of its rediscovery.

    I think it is far fetched to give this rediscovery alone so much credit for swerving western civilization into the modern world. But I do agree it is one of the important factors. Greenblatt used this event as a launching point to explore several of these events and factors and the key participants at the time. The portions of the book that focused on the time period, the people and leaders who lived through them and especially the martyrs created by a church desperate to avoid any thoughts or ideas that did not mesh neatly with their doctrine, were fascinating. Much of this information wasn't new, but Greenblatt is quite a story teller. Large sections of the book were real page-turners. And it is rare to find a non-fiction book about a 2000 year old poem written to honor one of the fringe philosophical movements of the time, that was rediscovered by a Catholic priest about 1600 years later after being long forgotten and buried in a monastery, that could achieve "page-turner" status.

    I highly recommend this book. And I highly recommend it be listened to. Edoardo Ballerini is one of my favorite narrators and he does an outstanding job on this book. His narration is what moves this from a four star to a five star.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • No Graves As Yet: A World War One Novel #1

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 13 mins)
    • By Anne Perry
    • Narrated By Michael Page
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (95)
    Performance
    (67)
    Story
    (69)

    On a sunny afternoon in late June, Cambridge professor Joseph Reavley is summoned from a student cricket match to learn that his parents have died in an automobile crash. Joseph's brother, Matthew, an officer in the Intelligence Service, reveals that their father had been en route to London to turn over to him a mysterious secret document.

    Lulu says: "A Slow Introduction to the Great War"
    "A Slow Introduction to the Great War"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I've put off reading this series for a few years and I am not certain why. It covers one of the most fascinating times in recent history - the First World War - and I tend to read anything I can about that time period. It is by an author whose other works I enjoy - to a degree. I found the first few books of the Monk series fascinating, the Pitt series far less so, although I read several of them. The problem with Perry is, while I like to read series books in order and one after the other, when possible, the books in her series tend to run together and they all begin to sound like essentially the same book with different secondary characters and London locations inserted into the same plot line.

    I was hopeful that would not be the case with this series. I enjoyed No Graves as Yet, the first book in the series. It takes place at the cusp of the war, the main event that drives the plot actually occurs the day the Archduke is shot. There was a family of main characters to get to know and while they all seemed dry and stiff, based on Perry's style of character development, as well as the time period the book was set in and the class of the family, that probably makes sense. There are more colorful characters when the plot moves to Cambridge and London, which keep the reader engaged. The problem was there wasn't anybody the reader could really like or really hate. There were several characters I found very annoying though. But the storyline was complex enough it kept my interest even if the characters always didn't.

    The mystery revolved around a plan to keep England out of the war.It seemed a little far fetched and overly complicated, but since this plan was the reason for the mystery that drove the book, I was OK with that. The end held a few surprises, which was great. In her other series, the endings quickly became predictable.

    The book was full of details regarding the ramp up to the war and Perry did an excellent job with her research and her ability to so clearly define a specific time and location.

    I usually enjoy Michael Page's narration, and he did a good job with this as well. The only problem I noticed with the narration was there were too many middle-aged male characters for him to give each a unique voice, inflection or diction and I had trouble telling who was talking sometimes. And he contributed to the annoying qualities of a few of the female and younger male characters by the shrillness of his voice sometimes.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • The Dog Stars

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 41 mins)
    • By Peter Heller
    • Narrated By Mark Deakins
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1393)
    Performance
    (1227)
    Story
    (1229)

    Hig survived the flu that killed everyone he knows. His wife is gone, his friends are dead, he lives in the hangar of a small abandoned airport with his dog, his only neighbor a gun-toting misanthrope. In his 1956 Cessna, Hig flies the perimeter of the airfield or sneaks off to the mountains to fish and to pretend that things are the way they used to be. But when a random transmission somehow beams through his radio, the voice ignites a hope deep inside him that a better life exists beyond the airport.

    Mike Naka says: "beautifully written and narrated!"
    "A Lyrical Post Apocalyptic View"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I am on a roll that started with The Girl With All the Gifts. This is the fourth post apocalyptic book I have read in the last 12 months. Which is 4 more than I've read in the last 20 years.

    The Dog Stars covers much the same ground as Station Eleven, or I guess I should say that the other way around since The Dog Stars came out first. It was perhaps better written. Heller's MFA from the Iowa Writer's Workshop shows. He writes almost lyrically. His magazine background shows as well. The writing is tight and he doesn't use any extra words. So much so that many of his sentences are just a single word. That can be annoying when reading, but I listened to this so I did not have that problem. And the narration was wonderful.

    The plot revolves around a guy's guy - a carpenter, outdoorsy Colorado guy who loves to hunt, fly his Cessna and most of all fish. His best friend is a dog and his companion is someone even more macho than Hig is. The author soften's Hig up a bit by confessing that he writes poetry and he clearly loved his wife. But Hig's response and reaction to the events occurring around him are definitely from a guy's perspective, so it was sometimes difficult for me to relate or wonder at his response.

    But Heller does a wonderful job of capturing the loneliness Hig deals with constantly. It is so thick you can physically feel it. He portrays Hig's lonely existence so well, that this is the first book of this type I have read where I found myself thinking that the 99.9% of the population that died got the better end of the deal. There seemed very little in his world that encouraged him to live. Especially after he loses his best friend. The chapter retelling that loss is one of the best pieces of writing I have seen in a very long time.

    There really wasn't a climactic end to the book, no resolution, no closure. I know that books in this genre can't have "happy" endings, but I always feel like I must have missed a couple of pages at the end, because the words just stop. And that is the only way you know the story is finished.

    I recommend this book. Especially in audio format. It is well worth reading.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Desert Bound

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 37 mins)
    • By Elizabeth Hunter
    • Narrated By Liisa Ivary
    Overall
    (8)
    Performance
    (8)
    Story
    (7)

    Alex McCann and Teodora "Ted" Vasquez left Cambio Springs together. Ted came back. Alex didn't. Now, years later, the future alpha of the McCann wolves has returned with plans to bring new life to the dying desert community. Plans that could change everything for the isolated enclave of shapeshifters in the California desert. Some love the plan. Others hate it. As the town's doctor and one of the strongest daughters in the cat clan, Ted has her own concerns about exposing her community to outsiders.

    Lulu says: "Good, But Not Quite Up To Par"
    "Good, But Not Quite Up To Par"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I enjoyed the first book in this series, as well as the novellas. I believe Ms. Hunter is an extremely talented author. Desert Bound was not a bad book and was eminently readable. If written by someone else I might have rated it higher. However, I felt that she wasn't terribly committed to this plot. After the years of tension, hurt feelings, anger, frustration and regret between the two main characters, their differences seemed fairly insurmountable. Then they reunited so abruptly it seemed almost anti-climactic. And while her books are usually chock full of characters, that works because she either proves their value to the story by the end of the book or makes it clear she is setting a character up in this book that will reoccur in future story lines with a purpose. I felt like there were superfluous characters in this book, involved in fairly heavy scenes and then disappearing without any idea of why they were included.

    Again, enjoyable book and definitely worth reading if you liked the first book in the series. I recommend you read the first book in the series and the novellas before reading this book. Just not up to her best efforts

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Before I Go

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 28 mins)
    • By Colleen Oakley
    • Narrated By Kirby Heyborne, Rebecca Lowman
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (99)
    Performance
    (87)
    Story
    (86)

    On the eve of what was supposed to be a triumphant "Cancerversary" with her husband Jack to celebrate three years of being cancer-free, Daisy suffers a devastating blow: Her doctor tells her that the cancer is back, but this time it's an aggressive stage four diagnosis. She may have as few as four months left to live. Death is a frightening prospect - but not because she's afraid for herself.

    Wendi says: "Blown Away By The Human Heart"
    "Lots of Problems"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is the story of a young woman who discovers the cancer she previously defeated has come back with a vengeance and now she has "lots of cancer." I know this sounds strange but to me, that phrase "lots of cancer" which the author uses frequently is the most original and inventive thing in the book.

    Rather than a story about a young woman and her husband who discover their marriage is about to end along with her life and how they handle that knowledge, the tragedy is used as a hook to lure the reader into yet another book about a troubled relationship that would quickly be fixed if only the characters would start talking to each other instead of to themselves. This is no different than so many of the contemporary chick lit or romance novels. The impending death of one half of the couple is nothing but a gimmick, not the driving force moving the plot along.

    I expect a a young woman facing her own mortality in the very near future would naturally be introspective. Introspective about her upcoming demise, how she feels about death, her fears about the process, how her beliefs and her faith or lack thereof affect the process, her concerns for her loved ones, etc. But there is very little of this. I admit I skipped through some of the numerous soliloquies she engaged in ad nauseam, but there seemed to be very little thought given to the actual act of her dying and death.

    The main character in this book spends her time obsessing about her relationship. Not the upcoming end to it, but whether this spouse who has already gone through so much with her really loves her or if he has already crossed her off and moved on. The male character is fairly well written and it seems obvious that he cares for his wife, at least obvious to everyone but her. She comes across as an 8th grader with her first boyfriend. A boyfriend she has so little faith in she is certain he cannot survive without her constant guidance.

    I liked the narrators. However, the female narrator already has something of a sing-songey voice and the author substitutes dialog for internal prose so often that the narrators lyrical voice just made the character more affected and less real.

    I admit i picked this book up hoping it would expand on the dialog that accompanied the recent death of Brittany Maynard. This seemed like a timely subject. And a subject that is sometimes easier to digest in fiction. But instead of a discussion regarding death and the choices faced by a young woman and a young married couple now facing that subject, we got a chick-lit romance in disguise with all of the angst of the worst of that genre and none of the depth of the best of that genre.

    I will say that the end of the book, written after her death begins to address the subject I expected to be addressed throughout the book.

    I cannot recommend this book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Then Came You: Animal Magnetism, Book 5

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 32 mins)
    • By Jill Shalvis
    • Narrated By Karen White
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (164)
    Performance
    (148)
    Story
    (151)

    Veterinary intern Emily can't believe she wound up in the small town of Sunshine, Idaho, instead of in a Los Angeles clinic like she had always imagined. Now she has to put her plans to move to L.A. on hold for a whole year while she fulfills the obligation of her vet school scholarship. Then Wyatt, her gorgeous one-night stand from a Reno vet conference, introduces himself as her new boss. And Emily is just as drawn to his seductive looks and quiet strength as she was on that very steamy night.

    Karen says: ""Lip Gloss Same Thing as Courage""
    "Annoyingly Airheaded Heroine"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I admit I have read the rest of the books in this series and enjoyed the first couple of them. They seem to get progressively weaker. And Karen White's narration, which used to not bug me is now like fingernails down a chalkboard. Her voice just drips with sincerity and has a catch in it right when you are ready to strangle the character for being so vapid. It sends me over the edge.

    But even a less annoying narrator could not save this book. There is no way the main character has the brains to get through vet school. She could not think herself out of a box and has absolutely no control over her thoughts, actions or emotions. She is the kind of person everyone hates - always trying to "help" others who don't need or want her help and are far better at taking care of themselves than she will ever be.

    The main male character, Wyatt is totally one dimensional. He is supposed to be some alpha male, but he seems to be so laid back that he might be asleep and no one has figured it out yet.

    The other problem I had was the author does create some interesting secondary characters. And not just characters from future books. The most interesting character in this book is Emily's sister. Why did she have multiple degrees, including a Phd in Philosophy and work construction. Why did she get away with using her student loans as an excuse not to pay her share of the rent? She should have thought of that before she decided to get multiple degrees and not use them. And the breakup with her girlfriend is never really explained. What could have been a very interesting character was basically introduced then ignored.

    After the previous book in this series, I swore I was done with it. And definitely done with Karen White as a narrator, no matter how much I want to listen to a book. However, in a moment of weakness, aka an Audible sale, I relented and got this book. I wish I had not.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Good Girl

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 38 mins)
    • By Mary Kubica
    • Narrated By Lindy Nettleton, Johnny Heller, Tom Taylorson, and others
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2976)
    Performance
    (2536)
    Story
    (2545)

    Born to a prominent Chicago judge and his stifled socialite wife, Mia Dennett moves against the grain as a young inner-city art teacher. One night, Mia enters a bar to meet her on-again, off-again boyfriend. But when he doesn't show, she unwisely leaves with an enigmatic stranger. With his smooth moves and modest wit, Colin Thatcher seems at first like a safe one-night stand. But following Colin home will turn out to be the worst mistake of Mia's life.

    Roger says: "Brilliant performances, moving story"
    "The Good Girl - The Bad Book"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book has garnered quite a bit of positive noise. I had fairly high hopes. Unfortunately, my hopes were dashed. It had good bones, but the primary characters, especially the mother, who was supposed to become gradually redeemed and sympathetic, were simply not likable. The only sympathetic character ends up being the character you should not sympathize with. I usually appreciate novels where the characters each have their own agenda and that agenda isn't revealed up front. But this book makes everyone without ulterior motives, seem like chumps at the end. It makes fools of characters who are trying to do the right thing at the expense of those with no redeeming value. Mia is no better than her father, so it is hard to appreciate his comeuppance.

    But the absolute worst character is the mother. She is worse than the evil father. She is so whiney, mealy-mouthed and shallow that you hope that whatever she wants she never gets. The narrator for the mother was terrible. I am not certain if I would have found the character quite as offensive if I had read it or if there was a different narrator. But I could easily tell why her husband and her daughters ignored her. I would too. To me, this character was so weak, so problematic and so unsympathetic, it affected my opinion of everyone else.

    There were also far to many holes and implausible plot twists. The detective just drops Colin's mother at a Nursing Home and they automatically accept her, no questions asked and with no funds? The detective takes weeks to check out a lead he learns about fairly early on. A lead that he knows instinctively should be followed up. The mother goes from ignoring her daughter, admitting she seldom talks to her daughter, is totally unconcerned when her daughter's friend calls and says she is missing, then we are supposed to abruptly understand that she really cares about her. The other daughter is defined as a bitch who dislikes her sister, then abruptly disappears from the plot. Why bother? Colin gives Mia his gun and isn't even concerned enough to know where she hid it?

    If you want to read a book about a kidnapped daughter that is well written, suspenseful, has engaging characters, and continually surprises you, I recommend Still Missing by Chevy Stevens, a much better book.

    I would not recommend The Good Girl to anyone.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.