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Richard

I'm a voracious reader who unfortunately spends a lot of time on the road. Audiobooks make my life a lot better.

Carolina Beach, NC, United States | Member Since 2007

46
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 15 reviews
  • 25 ratings
  • 356 titles in library
  • 18 purchased in 2014
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  • Guns

    • UNABRIDGED (49 mins)
    • By Stephen King
    • Narrated By Christian Rummel
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (921)
    Performance
    (835)
    Story
    (819)

    In a pulls-no-punches essay intended to provoke rational discussion, Stephen King sets down his thoughts about gun violence in America. Anger and grief in the wake of the shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School are palpable in this urgent piece of writing, but no less remarkable are King's keen thoughtfulness and composure as he explores the contours of the gun-control issue and constructs his argument for what can and should be done.

    Daniel E. Jacobs says: "putting his voice on what people have been saying"
    "Nothing really new here...sorry"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I'm not sure what my expectations were. I'm a huge second amendment supporter and certainly right of center politically and I agree with the sentiment that guns don't kill anyone at all. I also think that I've never seen a murder on TV (except I guess I did see Jack Ruby shoot Oswald, come to think of it). There are no murders on TV or in the movies, of course. All that said, I guess I expected a more reasoned approach from Stephen King. Some of his novels get a bit preachy (usually on the lefty side of the aisle) but never enough to bother me much, and I was actually surprised to hear he was a gun owner. His arguments are pretty familiar and lame, however. I am still and will always be a fan, however. As he said in the introduction, I'm one of those who thinks he should stick to writing books. In this essay, he's either preaching to the (gun-control) choir, or whatever the opposite metaphor would be (can't think of one offhand).

    7 of 12 people found this review helpful
  • Mr. Mercedes: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 22 mins)
    • By Stephen King
    • Narrated By Will Patton
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (4943)
    Performance
    (4627)
    Story
    (4636)

    In the frigid pre-dawn hours, in a distressed Midwestern city, hundreds of desperate unemployed folks are lined up for a spot at a job fair. Without warning, a lone driver plows through the crowd in a stolen Mercedes, running over the innocent, backing up, and charging again. Eight people are killed; fifteen are wounded. The killer escapes. Mr. Mercedes is a war between good and evil, from the master of suspense whose insight into the mind of this obsessed, insane killer is chilling and unforgettable.

    Joyce says: "Love this style of King!!!"
    "Different and familiar at the same time"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    First of all, if you’re hesitant about downloading this book because you’re a die-hard King fan and are worried that it’s billed as a kind of “murder mystery” or you’re worried that it’s only half the length of those long King books that you really like, then I have only “one” word for you: “fuggeddaboutit!” This is a really good book, and although it’s a bit different from the standard King novels, the murderer in this story is so sick, so terrible, so truly horrible that he might as well be one of King’s monsters that live under the street somewhere. In fact, he is all the more horrible because he lives among normal people, works in a computer store and drives an ice-cream truck, for God’s sake, or in the words of one of the characters "walks among us."

    The original crime (the killer drives a stolen Mercedes into a crowd of people and kills several of them and maims several more) almost takes place before the book even starts, or certainly before it gets going, and “solving” the case takes the entire rest of the book, but therein lies the real essence of the book. The “solving” gives King a canvas on which to paint and hang some really interesting, richly-drawn, flawed, and very likable characters (which, after all, is one of King's strongest skills) to contrast with the horrible killer.

    Although I wish it could have been longer, it would seem that it's about the right length, given the type of story. The only negative I can think of is that it seems a little slow to "get going," but once started it began to accelerate rapidly and kept me glued until it was over. I definitely recommend it.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Distant Hours

    • UNABRIDGED (22 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By Kate Morton
    • Narrated By Caroline Lee
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1535)
    Performance
    (1037)
    Story
    (1042)

    Edie Burchill and her mother have never been close, but when a long lost letter arrives one Sunday afternoon with the return address of Milderhurst Castle, Kent, printed on its envelope, Edie begins to suspect that her mother’s emotional distance masks an old secret.

    Simone says: "Right Mood At The Right Time"
    "The writing is superb, BUT..."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Reviewing this book is difficult for me. I often wondered what made me download it in the first place. I think must have been the blurb and the on-line ratings/reviews, but going back to look at them, I'm not sure I recognize any of them.

    What kept me going, and made me ultimately finish this book was not the story, which really didn't do much for me. It seemed a bit contrived, a kind of mystery without much point to it, by my lights. By the time I finally found out what actually happened, it seemed like I had already considered every possible solution, although whether I really considered the actual solution is something I can't recall.

    No, what made me finish the book was the writing. The author is a superb writer, and can make even things that are pretty uninteresting tweak one's ears. Her imagery is incredibly vivid, and some of the metaphors and similes she comes up with just made me smile while I was listening and wondering why I can't write in a similar manner. I wish I had written down some examples to quote here, but I'm certainly not going back to find them.

    And I can't say that the narration wasn't a big part of it. I am one of many Americans who find British accents very appealing to the ear. I suspect that if this was read in a bland Midwest US accent I would have not finished it and even returned it. Whether I would have do so with a print version we'll never know.

    The story was so convoluted that I think know I lost my place at least twice and listened to quite a few minutes over again; it took me a while to find where I left off and even then I wasn't sure. It didn't make me as mad as it could have in other books, because listening to her prose again was never bad.

    And yeah, I guess it's a "chick book" and I'm a guy, but one who often likes chick books. Usually what I like about these books are the deeply developed characters. The cast in this book seem a bit thin to me and the switching back and forth between 1941 and the 1990's was not really done all that smoothly; it's hard to do anyway, and I guess this story would have been almost impossible to tell without shifting timelines, so I'm not sure how the author could fix this issue in a way that would make me happy.

    In short, I wouldn't think of returning the book; I got too much pleasure out of listening to it. I think it's probably MUCH better audio than in print, and the author's lyrical and imagery writing skills are prodigious. If you don't like female English accents for a very long book, then it's not for you (although this was not a minus for me)

    Although I will certainly check out the author's other selections on Audible, I will be very careful and drag my feet before buying another Kate Morton book unless I can be a little more sure of the plot line.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Quantum: Einstein, Bohr, and the Great Debate about the Nature of Reality

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By Manjit Kumar
    • Narrated By Ray Porter
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (537)
    Performance
    (367)
    Story
    (360)

    Quantum theory is weird. As Niels Bohr said, if you aren’t shocked by quantum theory, you don’t really understand it. For most people, quantum theory is synonymous with mysterious, impenetrable science. And in fact for many years it was equally baffling for scientists themselves. In this tour de force of science history, Manjit Kumar gives a dramatic and superbly written account of this fundamental scientific revolution.

    Terezia says: "Biographic facts not explanations."
    "Quantum this!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I agree with other reviewers who said this is not a lecture on Quantum mechanics -- thank God! It is a fascinating biographical story of things that happened, for the most part, almost a hundred years ago (or more) and are still very poorly understand and agreed upon by the brightest minds of our time. There is, in my opinion, just about the right amount of science to mix with the story. These people were amazing at the turn of the last century. There was one relatively small character in the book who had ELEVEN of his students later win a Nobel prize. You can't make this stuff up. A good read especially if you really like the history of science even more than the science itself.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Secretariat

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 39 mins)
    • By William Nack
    • Narrated By Grover Gardner
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (181)
    Performance
    (131)
    Story
    (133)

    In 1973, Secretariat, the greatest champion in horse-racing history, won the Triple Crown. The only horse to ever grace the covers of Time, Newsweek, and Sports Illustrated in the same week, he also still holds the record for the fastest times in both the Kentucky Derby and the Belmont Stakes. He was also the only non-human chosen as one of ESPN's "50 Greatest Athletes of the Century".

    Susan says: "Wonderful book"
    "Great when it's the story, not the stats"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is a wonderful story, especially so when it sticks to the horse, the racing, and the people. Occasionally the author gets a little bogged down in lists of how much each horse won and the pedigree of various other horses. All in all, however, it's definitely worth the listen. The author can make a prose description of a horse race pretty exciting!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • 11-22-63: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (30 hrs and 44 mins)
    • By Stephen King
    • Narrated By Craig Wasson
    Overall
    (18191)
    Performance
    (16186)
    Story
    (16144)

    On November 22, 1963, three shots rang out in Dallas, President Kennedy died, and the world changed. What if you could change it back? In this brilliantly conceived tour de force, Stephen King - who has absorbed the social, political, and popular culture of his generation more imaginatively and thoroughly than any other writer - takes listeners on an incredible journey into the past and the possibility of altering it.

    Kelly says: "I Owe Stephen King An Apology"
    "He's Baaaaack!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Whatever it is in Stephen King’s head that makes him a great storyteller was as near dead as he was for quite a while after his brush with the grim reaper. I guess this isn’t all that surprising; who wouldn’t be a little nonplussed when things got so bad that your own obituary was published in a newspaper? But most people’s work doesn’t leave their brain process so naked and exposed. A doctor, for example, after a hear-death experience, might have a lot of changes in his approach to life and work, but very few people would know about the changes, probably least of all his patients. The story-telling machine in King’s head, I submit, was severely damaged after his accident, but not dead. His works since then seemed to lack something, but it was hard, even for a fan like me, to really put a finger on what was missing. When I first read (listened to) Under the Dome, I thought more than once to myself, “He’s back!” And he was… almost. The ending of the book just kind of left me cold, so much so that it’s hard to remember now what even happened. When you read the blurb about 11-22-63 it says it’s about a guy who finds a time portal and goes back to attempt to prevent Kennedy’s assassination. That would have been a short story, but this book is about so much MORE, however. It’s about a man finding a place in the world where he is loved, and a woman who loves him SO much. There are the peripheral and parallel plots at which King is a master both in creating and in keeping straight in his, and therefore in his reader’s heads. And you don’t have to agree with the book’s political stance, which is subtle – but yes, it’s there – in order to enjoy reading/listening to it.

    The interesting part about story-telling is that if you’re even a decent writer, if the story is there in your head, “all you have to do is write it down!” Admittedly that’s a little like saying that all you have to do in order to perform a heart transplant is “take the old one out and put the new one in, stupid!” I guess what it comes down to is that story telling, in the final analysis, is an art, and writing is basically a craft, and while “arts and crafts” are often fellow travelers, they aren’t the same thing. I don’t think King’s craft was hurt substantively in his accident, but his art, which seemed to have either left him, or least be pulling away from him, is back. A REALLY good book.

    The narration is excellent; the reader does an fairly authentic Maine accent (I don’t have one, but heard one often enough to know), and seems to find distinctive voices for most of myriad characters that are so much a part of King’s novels. I never got tired of listening to him.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Endgame: Bobby Fischer’s Remarkable Rise and Fall—from America’s Brightest Prodigy to the Edge of Madness

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 29 mins)
    • By Frank Brady
    • Narrated By Ray Porter
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (393)
    Performance
    (297)
    Story
    (301)

    From Frank Brady, who wrote one of the best-selling books on Bobby Fischer of all time and who was himself a friend of Fischer’s, comes an impressively researched biography that for the first time completely captures the remarkable arc of Bobby Fischer’s life. When Bobby Fischer passed away in January 2008, he left behind a confounding legacy. Everyone knew the basics of his life—he began as a brilliant youngster, then became the pride of American chess, then took a sharp turn, struggling with paranoia and mental illness. But nobody truly understood him.

    Roy says: "A Trajedy"
    "What a downer!!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Before I say my piece, I’ll state that the book was very well written and the reader was excellent (he had many different accents to perform, even Russian, German, Yiddish and a few others and did well with all of them, to my ear). This book is, of course, really a downer, but when you realize that Bobby Fisher’s entire life, except for a few chess highlights like winning the national championship at age 13 and the World Championship in 1972, was indeed a real downer.

    I for one, being an eager chess player but a real potzer in terms of skill, learned a lot from this book – just to list a few: the fact that he was married, the fact that he was incarcerated in Japan for several months and lived for several years in Iceland when a was a fugitive, for tax evasion and some other alleged violation of sanctions against a foreign country The author made it interesting without a lot of specific move notation and no diagrams at all (at least none in the audio edition ) and I think this makes the book understandable to a much wider audience. The almost meteoric rise of Fisher to the stratosphere of the chess world was in such stark contrast to the end of his life that the book couldn’t help having not only a sad ending, but a continually depressing entire second half. I guess I always wondered what really happened to Bobby Fisher, and now I know, I’m wondering if I can ever forget it.

    I certainly hope so.

    I’m going to try “Searching for Bobby Fisher” next and am hoping it can be an upper.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Speaks the Nightbird

    • UNABRIDGED (30 hrs and 47 mins)
    • By Robert McCammon
    • Narrated By Edoardo Ballerini
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2877)
    Performance
    (2568)
    Story
    (2554)

    The Carolinas, 1699: The citizens of Fount Royal believe a witch has cursed their town with inexplicable tragedies -- and they demand that beautiful widow Rachel Howarth be tried and executed for witchcraft. Presiding over the trial is traveling magistrate Issac Woodward, aided by his astute young clerk, Matthew Corbett. Believing in Rachel's innocence, Matthew will soon confront the true evil at work in Fount Royal....

    aaron says: "Dark, Twisted Period Piece with GREAT Characters!"
    "It's A HIT!!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    My first experience with McCammon was Swan Song and I was, quite frankly, amazed by it. When I saw that this was "historical" I spent some time reading reviews before I finally decided to download the first book. The word "historical" is usually a turnoff for me. I like my fiction totally fictional, but luckily the "history" in this book was so cunningly woven into the story and characters that it didn't distract me at all.

    First, the author is an astoundingly good writer. His descriptions really give great mental visuals. Even his description of clothing, which would normally bore me a bit, seem to really aid in the character development. His turns of phrase are quite clever as well, and although much of the book is very dark in character, there are moments where I laughed out loud.

    Second, this book is all about characters. The plot, as one reviewer said, is to some extent predictable: young hotshot figures everything out and all the establishment figures don't, and saves the beuatiful woman at the end. But think of the plot as just a scaffold on which the author hangs his truly beautiful prose and his deeply developed characters.

    Third, Matthew Corbett is just a very likeable young man. Supremely intelligent but not arrogant, confident without being overbearing. The other characters vary from bland to horrific.

    Once you get past the rather grand-sounding name (no offense intended at all, it's just that one could go a lifetime without meeting anyone called Edoardo Ballerini) the narrator is extremely talented. His job is made more difficult by the fact that there are so many characters in this book that he must keep separated. He does women's and even children's voices in a convincing manner, but seems never to intrude into the story.

    Now I don't see how I can avoid downloading all of the books. I can only hope that somewhere down the line he comes back to Fount Royal and sees what's become of Bidwell and Rachel and the other charcters. I can heartily recommend this book. I'll check back when I've listened to the second one.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • The Women: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (18 hrs and 34 mins)
    • By T. C. Boyle
    • Narrated By Grover Gardner
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (276)
    Performance
    (110)
    Story
    (114)

    Told through the experiences of the four women who loved him, this imaginative account of Frank Lloyd Wright's raucous life blazes with Boyle's trademark wit and invention. Boyle's protean voice captures these very different women and, in doing so, creates a masterful ode to the creative life in all its complexity and grandeur.

    Diane says: "didn't work for me"
    "Sorry, but..."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I think it is important that this is the ONLY audiobook to which I stopped listening after only an hour and never went back to. It just didn't seem that interesting. I wouldn't want to ruin it for anyone else -- maybe it's because I'm a fiction geek for the most part, and reality just doesn't interest me as much. Maybe I'll try it again later, but I cannot recommend this book.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • On Folly Beach

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 13 mins)
    • By Karen White
    • Narrated By Lyssa Browne
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (176)
    Performance
    (92)
    Story
    (93)

    Folly Beach, South Carolina, has survived despite hurricanes and war. But it's the personal battles of Folly Beach's residents that have left the most scars, and they are why a young widow has been beckoned there to heal her own. To most people, Folly Beach is simply the last barrier island before reaching the great Atlantic. To some, it's a sanctuary for lost souls, which is why Emmy Hamilton's mother encourages her to buy a local bookstore, Folly's Finds, hoping it will distract Emmy from the loss of her husband.

    L. Persyn says: "You won't want to get out of your car"
    "Quite disappointing"
    Overall

    Yes, I'm a guy, and yes I know this is a "chick" book, but normally I actually like "chick books," which are to me, very rich in characterization and detail. This one I could hardly finish. The alternating between 1942-3 and 2009 seemed almost as if two different authors wrote the stories. I've read several books which used this technique successfully, but this author just did not. While I cannot recommend the book, the narration was really quite good; she used several different voices and read with a lot of expression. I might well try other books read by her. Having spent time on Folly Beach myself (although never living there) sparked my interest in the book, but the local flavor, other than just some references to streets and such, weren't very intriguing either. I'll check and see if other books by the same author are available, and read the reviews a bit more carefully before I invest a credit again.

    4 of 5 people found this review helpful

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