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Zina

Member Since 2010

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HELPFUL VOTES
  • 4 reviews
  • 13 ratings
  • 107 titles in library
  • 4 purchased in 2015
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  • The Magic of Reality: How We Know What's Really True

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 42 mins)
    • By Richard Dawkins
    • Narrated By Richard Dawkins, Lalla Ward
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (980)
    Performance
    (850)
    Story
    (837)

    Richard Dawkins, the world’s most famous evolutionary biologist, presents a gorgeously lucid, science book examining some of the nature’s most fundamental questions both from a mythical and scientific perspective. Science is our most precise and powerful tool for making sense of the world. Before we developed the scientific method, we created rich mythologies to explain the unknown. The pressing questions that primitive men and women asked are the same ones we ask as children. Who was the first person? What is the sun? Why is there night and day?

    Connie says: "Audio version is superb for us grown-ups"
    "For those who did not learn in school"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you listen to The Magic of Reality again? Why?

    It is rather engagingly written and it is fun revisiting all these sciencey things.


    What did you like best about this story?

    It is put together in a fun way


    If you were to make a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

    What you really were supposed to learn in High School


    Any additional comments?

    I am only on my first half so maybe it will get better, but so far I did not learn anything amazingly new. Well, maybe little extra details here and there, and maybe refreshed my memory on things that I forgot since high school, but honestly, if you read your science textbooks you know most of this already. Some things I will never remember no matter how many times I see/hear them, so I guess it's fun to hear them one more time - like how many years separate different species, etc.

    It is still fun to hear all this stuff, like revisiting an old friend, and the book is extremely well written.

    I was snickering every time the narrator intoned "The Hebrew God" - yeah we got it, you are against.

    I was expecting something more. Something deeper. This is my first Dawkins book and I heard the name so many times. This was probably not the book to start with.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Martian Child

    • UNABRIDGED (4 hrs and 50 mins)
    • By David Gerrold
    • Narrated By Scott Brick
    Overall
    (138)
    Performance
    (43)
    Story
    (45)

    Gerrold, a science fiction writer from California, adopts a son who has a slight behavioral problem. He believes himself to be a Martian. Gerrold begins the long, involving work of trying to earn the acceptance of Dennis, a hyperactive eight-year-old who desperately wants a father's love, but is so insecure he feels he must be an alien. Gerrold's semi-autobiographical memoir of the first two years with Dennis is a funny, endearing, heartbreaking, and beautifully written testament to fatherhood.

    Michael says: "Good yet far from great"
    "Not a sci fi story"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What made the experience of listening to The Martian Child the most enjoyable?

    The most enjoyable was perhaps the expectation of - at some point - for the soppy super sentimental overdrawn story to actually turn to sci fi. I really did not care to listen to a super lengthy story about adoption of a difficult child and how it made the author feel.


    What was the most interesting aspect of this story? The least interesting?

    It was not what I thought it was. I thought it was a sci fi story! How did it win the Nebula award, no more stories written that year???


    Have you listened to any of Scott Brick’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    Scott Brick was fine.


    Any additional comments?

    This is not a sci fi story. This is a story of a single gay man adopting a child and talking about his feelings about this adoption at length. A very great length. If you want a sci fi story, skip. If you want a sentimental story about adopting a difficult child, listen.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Rendezvous with Rama

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Arthur C. Clarke
    • Narrated By Peter Ganim, Robert J. Sawyer
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2126)
    Performance
    (1357)
    Story
    (1381)

    At first, only a few things are known about the celestial object that astronomers dub Rama. It is huge, weighing more than ten trillion tons. And it is hurtling through the solar system at inconceivable speed. Then a space probe confirms the unthinkable: Rama is no natural object. It is, incredibly, an interstellar spacecraft. Space explorers and planet-bound scientists alike prepare for mankind's first encounter with alien intelligence.

    Peter Tersteeg says: "Excellent story, terrible naration"
    "Old-school hard core sci-fi at its finest"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What made the experience of listening to Rendezvous with Rama the most enjoyable?

    This book is so wonderfully detailed, and nothing happens without some logic behind it. The world is so wonderfully cohesive, and so strange and different.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    YES! This is a very exciting book.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Managing the Unexpected: Resilient Performance in an Age of Uncertainty, 2nd Edition

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 26 mins)
    • By Karl E. Weick, Kathleen M. Sutcliffe
    • Narrated By Judy Mahby
    Overall
    (15)
    Performance
    (11)
    Story
    (10)

    Since the first edition of Managing the Unexpected was published in 2001, the unexpected has become a growing part of our everyday lives. The unexpected is often dramatic, as with hurricanes or terrorist attacks. But the unexpected can also come in more subtle forms, such as a small organizational lapse that leads to a major blunder, or an unexamined assumption that costs lives in a crisis. Why are some organizations better able than others to maintain function and structure in the face of unanticipated change? Authors Karl Weick and Kathleen Sutcliffe answer this question by pointing to high reliability organizations (HROs).

    Zina says: "From one of the Biggest Names in Org Theory"
    "From one of the Biggest Names in Org Theory"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you listen to Managing the Unexpected again? Why?

    I am not sure. I might, just for some of the particular examples of preparedness


    What was one of the most memorable moments of Managing the Unexpected?

    The simple and powerful idea that typically, we provide weak responses to weak signals of trouble, and in many situations that's inadequate. Weak signs of trouble require strong responses. That idea stunned me.


    What aspect of Judy Mahby’s performance would you have changed?

    I hate to sound mean, but I would prefer somebody else.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    NO. It is not a book for fun. It is a book for work.


    Any additional comments?

    Karl Weick is one of the most influential scientists studying how firms operate. His theory of sensemaking was extremely influential. In this book, there are some pretty interesting ideas on how to manage things in a way that terrible things do not happen.

    What bothered me in this book is I could not necessarily see WHY would organizations go through all that trouble and the unpleasantness of executing the things needed, some sort of cost-benefit analysis if you will. In the examples that were provided it was pretty clear - sure, a terrible fire that could not be stopped is a horrible consequence. But let's face it, most of us work in far less critical environments and the worst that would happen - well maybe there'd be a scandal and the place would close. Is the added trouble worth it? I would like to see that addressed a bit more.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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