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S. Lev-Ami

Antigonos

Member Since 2005

175
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 22 reviews
  • 130 ratings
  • 1 titles in library
  • 24 purchased in 2014
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FOLLOWERS
4

  • The Mongoliad: The Foreworld Saga, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 25 mins)
    • By Neal Stephenson, Greg Bear, Mark Teppo, and others
    • Narrated By Luke Daniels
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (461)
    Performance
    (405)
    Story
    (406)

    In the late nineteenth century a mysterious group of English martial arts aficionados provided Sir Richard F. Burton, well-known expert on exotic languages and historical swordsmanship, a collection of long-lost manuscripts to translate. Burton’s work was subsequently misplaced, only to be discovered by a team of amateur archaeologists in the ruins of a mansion in Treiste. From Burton's translations and the original source material, the epic tale of The Mongoliad was recreated.

    Daniel says: "Good story - but"
    "Book By Committee"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Is there anything you would change about this book?

    See my remarks below. I expected much more from this book -- or should it be "project"?


    How would you have changed the story to make it more enjoyable?

    The dialogue was much too 21st century colloquial in far too many places. While I hate deliberately archaic dialogue, I really don't think anyone in the 13th century in Russia would be saying "OK".

    The ending of the book seemed to be simply "we've run out of ideas for the moment, we'll publish the next one when we think of more things to write".


    What did you like about the performance? What did you dislike?

    The narrator was adequate but not inspired. His flat, rather nasal Midwestern twang sorted oddly with the nationalities of the characters. He also mispronounced a number of fairly basic words


    Was The Mongoliad worth the listening time?

    I guess it is if you are a youngish, male, computer gamer who likes stories which are mainly full of gore and dead people. Fights/battles rehearsed in excruciating detail; most characters fairly cardboard. Not up to Neal Stevenson's standard if compared to Cryptonomicon or the Baroque Cycle.


    Any additional comments?

    Books written by a committee rarely if ever seem to jell. Raised on Harold Lamb's "March of the Barbarians", which not only told the saga of the Mongolian invasions but caught the atmosphere and flavor of both the Middle Ages and the Far East, this seemed to lack purpose and direction. Could see it marketed as a "dungeons and dragons" computer game in future.

    Stevenson is on record as saying that this sort of "interactive" project is the way he thinks books are going to go in the internet age. I disagree, sadly. He's better on his own [sometimes; of late he seems to just churn stuff out, alas.]

    33 of 40 people found this review helpful
  • Master and God: A Novel of the Roman Empire

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 44 mins)
    • By Lindsey Davis
    • Narrated By Robin Sachs
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (27)
    Performance
    (25)
    Story
    (25)

    Lindsey Davis’ Master and God is a vastly entertaining historical novel set in the reign of the Emperor Domitian in first-century Rome. It is on the one hand a love story between Gaius Vinius Clodianus, a valiant but reluctant member of the Praetorian Guard, whose military career is as successful as his marital history is disastrous, and Flavia Lucilla, daughter of a freed slave and hairdresser to the ladies of the imperial household. A devastating fire in Rome brings them together....

    2Ponds says: "Snore..."
    "Info Dump with Romance"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    Davis' concept of a wise-cracking, Raymond Chandleresque equivalent in ancient Rome, Didius Falco, was, at the time he first appeared, a new approach to the mystery novel and much praised. But Davis herself has never been an outstanding author, and there are now better authors in the genre [such as Ruth Downie]. Indeed, her later Falco novels weren't particularly good. But this novel is definitely more mediocre than her previous efforts. It is rather a "Everyday Life in Imperial Rome" with large dollops of history, social and political, and an awkward love story inserted at intervals.

    Falco succeeded in large part by being in the first person; this book is in the third, and that makes the narrative sections somewhat slow going, not helped by Robin Sachs' attempt at being laconic -- which comes across as monotonous and soporific.

    In short, this is overwritten, and not particularly interesting, and read rather than performed. I'd recommend Downie's "Medicus" series instead.

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • The Stars Look Down

    • UNABRIDGED (27 hrs and 32 mins)
    • By A. J. Cronin
    • Narrated By Arthur Blake
    Overall
    (29)
    Performance
    (15)
    Story
    (15)

    Set in the north of England at the turn of the century, this novel focuses on the lives and times of the people who lived there, describing the suffering of the miners and the advent of World War I.

    Cheryl says: "A wonderful historical novel"
    "A True Epic Novel"
    Overall

    This is one of A.J. Cronin's classic early works, describing the lives of miners in northern England. Long, but deeply interesting, even though it tells of a period [1909 to mid 1930's] which seems remote to us now. Coal mining, although very changed since then, has never been without danger or poverty. Cronin tells, basically, the stories of three families: Arthur Barras and his mine-owner father; David Fenwick, whose father and brothers are all miners, and his mother; and Joe Gowlan, who's determined to stop at nothing to amass as much power and money as he can. There is a huge number of subsidiary characters as well.

    The narrator does the dialect very well, but to be frank, it is so thick in places as to be difficult to understand [I think Cronin meant it this way; at the time, that was the way the people spoke]. Cronin's style is both descriptive and terse; his dialogue is very believable, and the narrator does a very good job with both.

    This is a book about several topics, not about miners alone. It's about the morality of power [absolute power corrupts absolutely], about war, about social injustice. A true classic, which stands alongside Cronin's other huge book, The Citadel.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • The Judas Tree

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 38 mins)
    • By A J Cronin
    • Narrated By Stephen Jack
    Overall
    (13)
    Performance
    (4)
    Story
    (6)

    David Moray, a Scottish doctor living in retirement in Switzerland, is haunted by the memory of a woman he once loved but wronged. He returns home to find her, but she has died. Instead, he meets her daughter, Kathy, and their friendship evolves into something more. Not believing he can have a life with Kathy, however, David decides to marry another woman, a countess. The betrayal has terrible consequences.

    S. Lev-Ami says: "Snobbery, Weakness, Betrayal"
    "Snobbery, Weakness, Betrayal"
    Overall

    Cronin's style is terse. His "hero" has survived a poor childhood, an immense struggle to become a doctor, arriving at an early retirement extremely wealthy, with a lifestyle replete with the finest tastes in art and culture. He is nevertheless massively insecure, constantly requiring the approval of those around him, and can be easily swayed as a result, so that not once but twice betrays those dearest to him. He is one of those with good intentions but is ultimately very destructive. Since David Moray is telling the story, we accept his rationalizations until almost the end. I found the book riveting. This is not a book I had been acquainted with before; but I have since gone on something of a Cronin binge because of it.

    The narrator is excellent; really brings the story to life. Highly recommended.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Dark Road to Darjeeling

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 43 mins)
    • By Deanna Raybourn
    • Narrated By Ellen Archer
    Overall
    (300)
    Performance
    (172)
    Story
    (176)

    Lady Julia Grey travels through India, accompanied by her sister, Portia, her brother, Plum, and occasionally her husband - Brisbane. Along the way, Portia becomes convinced of a murder, and all four are pulled into the dark underbelly of 19th-century India....

    Nereida says: "I love this series!"
    "Once Again, Ellen Archer Mangles a Good Story"
    Overall

    Deanna Raybourn hasn't disappointed in this 4th installment of Lady Julia/Nicholas Brisbane series. The story is intriguing and absorbing, set in a rather exotic setting [India] and with a cast of characters, each of whom has a motive for murder, a "White Rajah" who isn't exactly who he seems to be, and a man-eating tiger.

    But Ellen Archer, who is an American actress faking a British accent, is inadequate, as she has been in the previous 3 books. She badly needs a speech coach. Her attempt at being "elegant" results in numerous mispronounced words, the wrong syllabic emphasis for no reason, strangled vowels that sometimes make it very difficult to understand her. She doesn't do regional accents very well; indeed, the only two characters who sound normal are Americans! [Ms. Archer, however, has a lovely singing voice] I think Barbara Rosenblat [Amelia Peabody novels], also American, is the exception that proves the rule: if a story is being told in the first person by a British narrator, get a Brit to do the narration. If Lady Julia hadn't sounded as if she was being choked to death a number of times, I'd have given this book 5 stars.

    11 of 13 people found this review helpful
  • Mystical Paths

    • UNABRIDGED (22 hrs and 5 mins)
    • By Susan Howatch
    • Narrated By Roe Kendall
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (23)
    Performance
    (9)
    Story
    (9)

    Nicholas Darrow, a strong-willed and independent young man, has grown up under the shadow of the Church of England and the loving but watchful eye of his father, an Anglican priest. Like his father, he too has both a gift and a burden in the form of psychic abilities. Although his father warns him to nurture his special powers with care, Nicholas can see no harm in the occasional dazzling "psychic flourish" - until one results in a friend's attempted suicide.

    S. Lev-Ami says: "Not the Best of Howatch"
    "Not the Best of Howatch"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Story: In my opinion, this is the weakest of the "Church of England" books, because of the large paranormal element, and the somewhat unbelievable plot, but with her usual skill, Howatch carries it off. There's no doubt she is a very talented writer, and I recommend this if you've read any of the others and like the genre. It may be too "churchy" for some, and too static for others [none of the novels are action adventures, really]. The summing up at the end sounds a lot like a sermon, and I'm not fondest of Nicholas Darrow when he's preaching. For Howatch, it is an unusually clumsy ending.

    Narrator: Why, oh why, when the story is told in the first person by a MAN, and most of the characters are male, is the book read by a WOMAN? Nicholas, who is 25, sounds like a 12 year old whose voice hasn't yet broken. At times different characters all have the same accent, making dialogue confusing. The narrator is a competent reader, but a man who has a range of accents would have been much better.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Rich are Different

    • UNABRIDGED (28 hrs and 52 mins)
    • By Susan Howatch
    • Narrated By Nadia May
    Overall
    (98)
    Performance
    (33)
    Story
    (30)

    The Rich Are Different is the story of Dinah Slade, a young Englishwoman of immense vitality and great sensual power, whose life, loves, and fierce ambition become entangled with the fate of an American banking family. When Paul Van Zale, a handsome patrician and powerful American banker, meets Dinah in London, he commits the imprudence of falling in love with her. When Dinah follows him to his world, she is caught up in the currents of Paul's life. And among her new acquaintances is Paul's wife.

    Linda Lou says: "Excellent!"
    "Good, But Flawed in Production"
    Overall

    There are two criteria for judging an audiobook:
    1] Story. In this case, Susan Howatch has ingeniously reinterpreted a classic historical episode, moving it from ancient Rome to the 1920s. With the exception of the incident of how Dinah Slade met Paul van Zale, which is a bit overdone, I found the book continually interesting and well written.
    2] Narrator: Nadia May is a good reader, but limited. Since, of the six persons who tell the story, only 2 are women, it would seem that either a male reader or a group of readers would have been better. Ms. May cannot do more than a single American accent (so that all the characters except Dinah sound the same), nor can she effectively drop her voice enough to sound as if she were a man. Further, there is an annoying production fault in that certain sentences are repeated at intervals throughout the book.
    In spite of the above reservations, I recommend this book very much.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Cathedral of the Sea

    • UNABRIDGED (22 hrs and 59 mins)
    • By Ildefonso Falcones
    • Narrated By Paul Michael
    Overall
    (508)
    Performance
    (140)
    Story
    (143)

    At last: The international best seller - which has already sold nearly 2 million copies worldwide - comes to America! Cathedral of the Sea follows the fortunes of the Estanyol family, from their peasant roots to a son, Arnau, who flees the land only to realize spectacular wealth and devastating problems.

    Joseph says: "Very good historical novel."
    "Spanish "Pillars""
    Overall

    Sort of a Spanish "Pillars of the Earth", but much better written. Personally, I'm not a fan of books about childhood, and I think this one spends too much time on Arnau's miserable one, but it does explain much of his character later, which seems at times to be strangely passive and rather too saintly. Also, the Jews are idealized too much, and the Inquisition is too stereotypically nasty. Falcones wants to be sure we know all the fruits of his research, with disquisitions on just about every subject. The narration is perfectly adequate, but not inspired. A good listen if you like long audiobooks, but I found myself skipping sections by the time Arnau gets entangled with the Inquisition to find out how the book ends.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Possession

    • UNABRIDGED (22 hrs and 48 mins)
    • By A. S. Byatt
    • Narrated By Virginia Leishman
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (293)
    Performance
    (141)
    Story
    (139)

    As a pair of young scholars research the lives of two Victorian poets, they uncover their letters, journals, and poems, and track their movements from London to Yorkshire - from spiritualist seances to the fairy-haunted far west of Brittany. What emerges is an extraordinary counterpoint of passion and ideas.

    Inga E. Calvin says: "audible poetry"
    ""Possession" Certainly Didn't Grab Me"
    Overall

    This may be a book which is better read than listened to. The long excerpts from the fictional author's work [called "Ragnarok"] made my eyes glaze over. Perhaps if they had been read by a man, to distinguish them from the book's narrative, read by a woman,[why, I am not sure since it seems to be from a male POV] it might have helped. I simply could NOT finish this, no matter how much I gritted my teeth and tried to plow through. The modern story seemed to go nowhere. It short, "Possession" was boring.

    4 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • Pope Joan

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 24 mins)
    • By Donna Woolfolk Cross
    • Narrated By Barbara Rosenblat
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (213)
    Performance
    (131)
    Story
    (128)

    For a thousand years her existence has been denied. She is the legend that will not die - Pope Joan, the ninth-century woman who disguised herself as a man and rose to become the only female ever to sit on the throne of St. Peter. Now in this riveting novel, Donna Woolfolk Cross paints a sweeping portrait of an unforgettable heroine who struggles against restrictions her soul cannot accept.

    Reuven Nisser says: "Lady Pope"
    "Silly Woman!"
    Overall

    Donna Cross leaves no cliche uncoined in this overlong and faintly ridiculous attempt at the legend of a medieval female pope. There are numerous anachronisms, and the turgid prose, predictable plot make it very difficult for Barbara Rosenblat to give it a convincing reading. After her exceptional reading of the Amelia Peabody novels, I had hoped for much more from her. The yawn factor was very high for me with this book. I'm being generous with 3 stars.

    11 of 15 people found this review helpful

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