Customer Reviews | Audible.com
 

You no longer follow Thomas

You will no longer see updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can re-follow a user if you change your mind.

OK

You now follow Thomas

You will receive updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can unfollow a user if you change your mind.

OK

Thomas

Chapel Hill, NC, United States | Member Since 2006

256
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 65 reviews
  • 146 ratings
  • 0 titles in library
  • 10 purchased in 2014
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
30

  • How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Paul Tough
    • Narrated By Dan John Miller
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (335)
    Performance
    (283)
    Story
    (281)

    The story we usually tell about childhood and success is the one about intelligence: Success comes to those who score highest on tests, from preschool admissions to SATs. But in How Children Succeed, Paul Tough argues for a very different understanding of what makes a successful child. Drawing on groundbreaking research in neuroscience, economics, and psychology, Tough shows that the qualities that matter most have less to do with IQ and more to do with character: skills like grit, curiosity, conscientiousness, and optimism.

    Gregory says: "Heavy on Anecdotes, light on data"
    "long"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    although not a long book, it's long for what is in here, which is a rehash of many of the same experiemnts that are in lots of other similar books. In addition, there is little helpful here....yes, children who can postpone eating a marshmellow do better than those who can't, and this may be even more important predictor than intelligence, but as a father of several young kids, the key question remains....WHY do some kids have better self control and is this inherited or a changeable/teachable trait. No answers there. And the author even contradicts himself at the end, stating that "urturing" is important at an early age but that later one needs to balance being demanding vs. nurturing. Well, yeah, that's pretty much why parenting is so hard in a nutshell.

    narration is adequate.

    6 of 6 people found this review helpful
  • The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By Rebecca Skloot
    • Narrated By Cassandra Campbell, Bahni Turpin
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3694)
    Performance
    (2275)
    Story
    (2300)

    Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer who worked the same land as her slave ancestors, yet her cells, taken without her knowledge, became one of the most important tools in medicine. The first immortal human cells grown in culture, they are still alive today, though she has been dead for more than 60 years.

    Prisca says: "Amazing Story"
    "parts outstanding"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    parts of this are amazing, but other parts i feel were pretty boring and long winded, and the emphasis on her family seems overblown.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Five Days in November

    • UNABRIDGED (3 hrs and 51 mins)
    • By Clint Hill, Lisa McCubbin
    • Narrated By Jeremy Bobb
    Overall
    (16)
    Performance
    (16)
    Story
    (15)

    Clint Hill will forever be remembered as the lone secret service agent who jumped onto the car after President Kennedy was shot, clinging to its sides as it sped toward the hospital. Even now, decades after JFK’s presidency, the public continues to be fascinated with the Kennedys - America’s royal family. To mark the 50th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy’s assassination, Hill recounts his indelible memories of those five days leading up to, and after, that tragic day in November 1963. Hill, as Jackie’s guard, experienced those days firsthand.

    Thomas says: "unique"
    "unique"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    i have read many many books about kennedy and the assassination. This is unique in that it is a first hand account, so even for people who know a lot about it, i would highly recommend. Given length, obviously not a comprehensive history, but really worthwhile.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • End of Days: The Assassination of John F. Kennedy

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 50 mins)
    • By James L. Swanson
    • Narrated By Richard Thomas
    Overall
    (13)
    Performance
    (12)
    Story
    (12)

    Swanson takes us to the sixth-floor Texas Book Depository window to look through Oswald's rifle sights, re-creates the last hours of the doomed assassin, and the day of national mourning for the president that followed, culminating in a funeral that united the country. Combining extensive research with his unparalleled storytelling abilities, Swanson turns the events of one of the darkest days of the twentieth century into a pulse-pounding thriller that will remain the definitive account of the assassination for years to come.

    Thomas says: "gets better and better"
    "gets better and better"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    the end.


    Any additional comments?

    slow at first but really gets better and better, with more new information on interrogation of oswald and an outstanding ending putting the entire assignation in the context of history. one of the best.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 35 mins)
    • By Sam Kean
    • Narrated By Sean Runnette
    Overall
    (1966)
    Performance
    (1203)
    Story
    (1208)

    Reporter Sam Kean reveals the periodic table as it’s never been seen before. Not only is it one of man's crowning scientific achievements, it's also a treasure trove of stories of passion, adventure, betrayal, and obsession. The infectious tales and astounding details in The Disappearing Spoon follow carbon, neon, silicon, and gold as they play out their parts in human history, finance, mythology, war, the arts, poison, and the lives of the (frequently) mad scientists who discovered them.

    Ethan M. says: "Excellent, if unfocused"
    "random collection of stories"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Interesting in places, pretty boring in others. This book is about the periodic table in the same way any story about anything related to science can be linked to the periodic table, since after all everything is made of elements.
    so average, non-compelling work. Perhaps because the material is so iffy the narration feels long winded...

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Don't Put Me In, Coach: My Incredible NCAA Journey from the End of the Bench to the End of the Bench

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 22 mins)
    • By Mark Titus
    • Narrated By Tyler Seiple
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (32)
    Performance
    (31)
    Story
    (31)

    An irreverent, hilarious insider's look at big-time NCAA basketball, through the eyes of the nation's most famous benchwarmer and author of the popular blog ClubTrillion.com (3.6m visits!). Mark Titus holds the Ohio State record for career wins, and made it to the 2007 national championship game. You would think Titus would be all over the highlight reels. You'd be wrong.

    Thomas says: "just plain funny..."
    "just plain funny..."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Great entertainment. One of those books you could just listen to straight through. Not sure how he did not get kicked off the team....but great that he did not. Really funny and will have you laughing to yourself and having others wonder what the heck you are listening to.


    Really well read.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • End This Depression Now!

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Paul Krugman
    • Narrated By Rob Shapiro, Paul Krugman
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (220)
    Performance
    (183)
    Story
    (180)

    The Great Recession that began in 2007 is now more than four years old - and counting. Some 24 million Americans are unemployed or underemployed, and at recent rates of job creation we won’t be back to normal levels of employment until late this decade. This is a tragedy. Do we have to accept it? "No!" is the resounding answer given by Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman in this call to arms. We have seen this situation before and we know how to fix it; all we lack is the political will to take action.

    Michael says: "Listen to this before you vote!"
    "Too one sided, slow"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I expected a diatribe and that is what I got, but even the there are so many unsubstantiated opinions that leaves one asking why not back up your arguments better. One recollection I have is a sentence that the European ministers increased interest rates because of an unfounded fear of inflation. Well these are smart people too. Why were they fearful? What signals were they misreading?

    Also fundamentally this whole book comes down to thinking that World War II is a model for everything, and how do we know that this applies today?

    Finally the reading was waaaaaayyyyyy too slow and boring and drawn out.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Quest: Energy, Security, and the Remaking of the Modern World

    • UNABRIDGED (29 hrs and 31 mins)
    • By Daniel Yergin
    • Narrated By Robert Petkoff
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (236)
    Performance
    (183)
    Story
    (183)

    A master storyteller as well as a leading energy expert, Yergin shows us how energy is an engine of global political and economic change. It is a story that spans the energies on which our civilization has been built and the new energies that are competing to replace them. From the jammed streets of Beijing to the shores of the Caspian Sea, from the conflicts in the Mideast to Capitol Hill and Silicon Valley, Yergin takes us into the decisions that are shaping our future.

    Joshua Kim says: "Best nonfiction book of 2011"
    "must reading.."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    for anyone interested in politics, history, or any aspect of modern society.

    This is a great author. I have read “the Prize” at least 3 times and this is as good. It is a great overview of energy. What he has a unique gift for is letting the reader understand the primacy the quest for and acquisition of energy has on everything in our modern life. The book is thorough but fast paced and covers every aspect of energy and provides the reader with a comprehensive understanding of both the recent history of the search for and development of energy sources but also a comprehensive understanding of where we are headed. Its also very level headed…I did not get any “political” agenda. Just the facts. There is no “coal is awful, we need to develop all renewable sources” or “oil is wonderful and will last forever”, rather there is continuous crituqes of previously expounded opinions and the reader can draw his/her own conclusions.
    Finally the reading is perfect..well paced, not boring, just a great experience.
    I could not recommend more highly..a great great book I am sure I will listen to again.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Quantum: Einstein, Bohr, and the Great Debate about the Nature of Reality

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By Manjit Kumar
    • Narrated By Ray Porter
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (460)
    Performance
    (298)
    Story
    (290)

    Quantum theory is weird. As Niels Bohr said, if you aren’t shocked by quantum theory, you don’t really understand it. For most people, quantum theory is synonymous with mysterious, impenetrable science. And in fact for many years it was equally baffling for scientists themselves. In this tour de force of science history, Manjit Kumar gives a dramatic and superbly written account of this fundamental scientific revolution.

    Terezia says: "Biographic facts not explanations."
    "part good, part bad"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Good book. I especially enjoyed the first half…this is the part of the history of physics that I would think peole are most familiar with…the development of the quantum theory from the late 1800s to early 1900s. At that point I was ready to give the book a 5, as it entertainingly weaves biographies of the key players with their contributions to physics in a very engaging way. Amazingly, every contributor except one (Schroedinger) made their biggest and most profound earth changing contributions when they were in their young 20s. Truly amazing history.

    Unfortunately, the book takes a turn for the worse. The 3rd of the 4 quarters of the book I found boring..it is several hours of incredibly nuanced discussion of differences of opinion between Bohr and Einstein. While this may be of interest to a theoretical physicist, as a medical scientists with an MD PhD I could not follow this. The last quarter of the book picked up a little and put some things into broader perspective, but again by this time physics is so ethereal, mathematical, and without any way to conceptualize what is being described, that I found it difficulty to follow and understand. The denouement is good as it describes the fading into the background of all these great scientists.

    On other thing that bugged me is that some stuff is completely over stated. For instance at one point the author claims that the most striking scientific discovery from 1964 is (I cannot remember the specifics now) a finding that validated Bohr’s quantum approach. I bet if you talked to anyone who is not a theoretical physicist, they would think that one of the other discoveries from the year which he lists as examples have had more impact on our lives.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • That's Why I'm Here: The Chris and Stefanie Spielman Story

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 50 mins)
    • By Chris Spielman, Bruce Hooley
    • Narrated By Adam Verner
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (5)
    Performance
    (5)
    Story
    (5)

    Chris Spielman was a high school and Ohio State football legend and a four-time Pro Bowl linebacker, but he didn't tackle his toughest opponent until his playing career was almost over. In 1998, his wife, Stefanie, was diagnosed with breast cancer. So began an 11-year journey that brought joy and suffering to the Spielmans, as well as hope and inspiration to thousands of others. Though Stefanie passed away on November 19, 2009, this book reminds us that her spirit is still here.

    Thomas says: "incredible"
    "incredible"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    just a great book, moving, poignant, well paced, well written, well performed. I would highly highly recommend this.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Anatomy of Injustice: A Murder Case Gone Wrong

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 11 mins)
    • By Raymond Bonner
    • Narrated By Mark Bramhall
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (21)
    Performance
    (17)
    Story
    (17)

    In January 1982, an elderly white widow was found brutally murdered in the small town of Greenwood, South Carolina. Police immediately arrested Edward Lee Elmore, a semiliterate, mentally retarded black man with no previous felony record. His only connection to the victim was having cleaned her gutters and windows, but barely ninety days after the victim’s body was found, he was tried, convicted, and sentenced to death. Elmore had been on death row for eleven years when a young attorney named Diana Holt first learned of his case.

    Thomas says: "you'll never believe in justice again"
    "you'll never believe in justice again"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    very well read.
    a little long toward the end, but still: very powerful, factual and what can you say, i am not sure one could believe in the death penalty after reading examples like this. makes you wonder about the whole system. hope this is rare.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

CANCEL

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.