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SILVER SPRING, MD, United States

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  • The Buddha and the Quantum: Hearing the Voice of Every Cell

    • UNABRIDGED (3 hrs and 58 mins)
    • By Samuel Avery
    • Narrated By Samuel Avery
    Overall
    (25)
    Performance
    (22)
    Story
    (20)

    Are you seeking a deeper understanding of consciousness? Are you interested in meditation or currently practicing meditation? The Buddha and the Quantum is about the connection between meditation and physics. Many books show parallels between consciousness and physics; a few of these attempt to explain consciousness in terms of the physics of everyday experience. This is the only book that explains physics and the everyday world in terms of consciousness alone.

    private says: "Connects quantum theory to subjective experience"
    "Connects quantum theory to subjective experience"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    As a quantum physicist and a meditator I found Avery's speculations delightful and eye-opening. His point, as I see it, is to draw the connection between our subjective experiences and the fundamental construction of reality as envisioned by many modern quantum physicists, such as Vlatko Vedral, Seth Lloyd, and others. Because quantum entanglement experiments seem to show that reality as we know it does not exist outside our present awareness, and the distillation of experience from the quantum wave function ("collapse of the wave function") is always associated with conscious awareness, these physicists conclude reality is a mental process, the result of our experience being a computer simulation (a view also bolstered by the recent finding that quantum theory can be recast as a type of information processing logic). Avery shares this view and proposes that we can observe the simulation in operation ourselves, if we have the perspective that our experience is that simulation (the Buddhists have the equivalent view that life is a dream). He explains that perspective in simple terms.

    I would have liked to have a more detailed explanation of two things: Why he believes acceleration can be treated as a second time dimension (orthodoxy sees acceleration as a rotation of velocity between the time and space dimensions), and why he believes mass can be treated as a dimension.

    Personally, I don't see why Avery's perspective wasn't extensively explored by physicists immediately upon discovering that events don't happen until we observe them, in 1925. Reality doesn't exist outside our present awareness? We have a perfectly familiar model for that: If you dream of a rock, does the rock exist when you turn your back on it? But as Copernicus showed, just because an idea is simple doesn't mean it's obvious, nor welcome.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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