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Eric

Chico, CA, United States | Member Since 2005

ratings
25
REVIEWS
9
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
0
HELPFUL VOTES
72

  • The Pirate Coast: Thomas Jefferson, The First Marines, and the Secret Mission of 1805

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 22 mins)
    • By Richard Zacks
    • Narrated By Raymond Todd
    Overall
    (372)
    Performance
    (101)
    Story
    (103)

    After Tripoli declared war on the United States in 1801, Barbary pirates captured 300 U.S. sailors and marines. President Jefferson sent navy squadrons to the Mediterranean, but he also authorized a secret mission to overthrow the government of Tripoli. He chose an unlikely diplomat, William Eaton, to lead the mission, but before Eaton departed, Jefferson grew wary of the affair and withdrew his support.

    Stewart Kennedy says: "EXCELLENT"
    "Amazing"
    Overall

    Unbelievable detail. Those who love history will thoroughly enjoy this book. You come to know the main character of this non-fiction in vivid detail. The stories of courage and patriotism during the birth of our nation is refreshing.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The First Frontier: The Forgotten History of Struggle, Savagery, and Endurance in Early America

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 15 mins)
    • By Scott Weidensaul
    • Narrated By Paul Boehmer
    Overall
    (53)
    Performance
    (48)
    Story
    (49)

    Frontier: the word carries the inevitable scent of the West. But before Custer or Lewis and Clark, before the first Conestoga wagons rumbled across the Plains, it was the East that marked the frontier - the boundary between complex Native cultures and the first colonizing Europeans.Here is the older, wilder, darker history of a time when the land between the Atlantic and the Appalachians was contested ground - when radically different societies adopted and adapted the ways of the other, while struggling for control of what all considered to be their land.

    Eric says: "Too PC"
    "Too PC"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I'm giving this book good marks because of the thorough content. The book was well researched and will give you a good glimpse of the chaos of the frontier settlements. However, I had to hold my nose half a dozen times when listening to the book. The author is a bedwetting liberal who finds it easy to blame "Whitey" first for most provocations along the frontier - often (not always) omitting information that the attacks were retaliations, ie. Paxton Boys, almost as if the frontier settlers just woke up one day and decided to raid an Indian village for no apparent reason.

    The author tip toed around any historical reference which had the potential of offending Indians.

    When describing attacks by the whites he uses the words ruthless, slaughter, massacre, etc. but when mentioning attacks by the Indian "Braves" and "Warriors" they just "killed" "Attacked" or captured the settlers - emphasizing that the "prisoners" were well treated and easily assimilated into the Indian Life.

    .

    4 of 7 people found this review helpful
  • What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1815 - 1848

    • UNABRIDGED (32 hrs and 50 mins)
    • By Daniel Walker Howe
    • Narrated By Patrick Cullen
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (465)
    Performance
    (269)
    Story
    (262)

    In this addition to the esteemed Oxford History of the United States series, historian Daniel Walker Howe illuminates the period from the Battle of New Orleans to the end of the Mexican-American War, an era of revolutionary improvements in transportation and communications that accelerated America's expansion and prompted the rise of mass political parties.

    Amazon Customer says: "Excellent"
    "Monotone"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Written like an encyclopedia and read with a monotone voice who rushes between topics. Utterly miserable listen

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Frontiersmen: A Narrative

    • UNABRIDGED (30 hrs and 29 mins)
    • By Allan W. Eckert
    • Narrated By Kevin Foley
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (317)
    Performance
    (253)
    Story
    (258)

    The frontiersmen were a remarkable breed of men. They were often rough and illiterate, sometimes brutal and vicious, often seeking an escape in the wilderness of mid-America from crimes committed back east. In the beautiful but deadly country which would one day come to be known as West Virginia, Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, more often than not they left their bones to bleach beside forest paths or on the banks of the Ohio River.

    Whitney says: "A Masterpiece for History Novel Enthusiasts!"
    "Couldn't put it down"
    Overall

    First book in a long time that I couldn't put down. I stayed up until 4:00am to finish it up. The reader is the best in the industry and the content is amazing in detail. If you like early American Frontiersman stories, you'll love this one.

    8 of 8 people found this review helpful
  • Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 19 mins)
    • By Jack Weatherford
    • Narrated By Jonathan Davis, Jack Weatherford
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3554)
    Performance
    (2162)
    Story
    (2182)

    The Mongol army led by Genghis Khan subjugated more lands and people in 25 years than the Romans did in 400. In nearly every country the Mongols conquered, they brought an unprecedented rise in cultural communication, expanded trade, and a blossoming of civilization.

    Peter says: "Brilliant, insightful, intriguing."
    "Great Book"
    Overall

    The book was well researched and thorough and the reader was very good. With that said you can sense that the writer had a little bias (I call it a man-crush) on Gengis Kahn and attributed the Mongol Empire as having developing the modern world short of landing on the moon and the invention of the computer. The real truth is that the Mongols contributed nothing but terror to the people of the dark ages and enslaved the masons, astrologist, scientists and craftsman of races with superior intellect (Chinese, Persians, Eastern Europeans, etc) and attributed their inventions and contributions to society to the Mongols who ruled (or payed tribute to) the lands by threat of death. The real truth is that if 30 million innocent citizens were not attacked, these contributions would have occurred naturally.

    It sounds like I'm attacking the author, but I'm not. I highly recommend this book. He did a great job, it is just readily apparent he had a skewed view of what he calls "The great leader" and even visited his grave to pay homage and shed some tears (in his own words). Gengis Kahn was no more than murderous thug who invented perhaps the first ponzi scheme: He would take a handfull of warriors to a village and pillage all of their goods and tell the males to join his clan or die. Then he would have more warriors to attack the next larger village until he had an army of hundreds of thousands where he attacked major cities. Once his army got too large to manage, his successors lost hold and the scheme fell apart.

    16 of 25 people found this review helpful
  • Mayflower: A Story of Courage, Community, and War

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 39 mins)
    • By Nathaniel Philbrick
    • Narrated By George Guidall
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (767)
    Performance
    (205)
    Story
    (205)

    From the perilous ocean crossing to the shared bounty of the first Thanksgiving, the Pilgrim settlement of New England has become enshrined as our most sacred national myth. Yet, as best-selling author Nathaniel Philbrick reveals in his spellbinding new book, the true story of the Pilgrims is much more than the well-known tale of piety and sacrifice; it is a 55-year epic that is at once tragic, heroic, exhilarating, and profound.

    John M says: "Fascinating book about a little-understood time"
    "Fantastic"
    Overall

    Just what I was looking for. A well documented and well researched story about the Mayflower with a very good reader. Highly recommend.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies

    • ABRIDGED (5 hrs and 58 mins)
    • By Jared Diamond
    • Narrated By Grover Gardner
    Overall
    (1290)
    Performance
    (236)
    Story
    (240)

    In this groundbreaking work, evolutionary biologist Jared Diamond stunningly dismantles racially based theories of human history by revealing the environmental factors actually responsible for history's broadest patterns. It is a story that spans 13,000 years of human history, beginning when Stone Age hunter-gatherers constituted the entire human population. Guns, Germs, and Steel is a world history that really is a history of all the world's peoples, a unified narrative of human life.

    Lorac says: "Badly Abridged"
    "Term Paper"
    Overall

    It read more like a term paper than a book.

    2 of 7 people found this review helpful
  • Oh What a Slaughter: Massacres in the American West, 1846 - 1890

    • UNABRIDGED (4 hrs and 24 mins)
    • By Larry McMurtry
    • Narrated By Michael Prichard
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (65)
    Performance
    (18)
    Story
    (18)

    In Oh What a Slaughter, Larry McMurtry has written a unique, brilliant, and searing history of the bloody massacres that marked, and marred, the settling of the American West in the 19th century, and which still provoke immense controversy today.

    Flavius says: "Enjoyable and Balanced"
    "Biased"
    Overall

    If you want to hear, "White man is bad - Indians are good", then this is your book. The author uses adjectives like "Brave, Warrior, peaceful" when speaking of the Indians and "corrupt, greedy, massacrers" for the white settlers.

    The book was more like the author's notebook and not well organized.

    10 of 16 people found this review helpful
  • Andrew Jackson: His Life and Times

    • UNABRIDGED (26 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By H.W. Brands
    • Narrated By John H. Mayer
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (215)
    Performance
    (86)
    Story
    (91)

    The most famous American of his time, Andrew Jackson is a seminal figure in American history. The first "common man" to rise to the presidency, Jackson embodied the spirit and the vision of the emerging American nation; the term "Jacksonian democracy" is embedded in our national lexicon. With the sweep, passion, and attention to detail that made The First American a Pulitzer Prize finalist, historian H.W. Brands shapes a historical narrative that's as fast-paced and compelling as the best fiction.

    Eric says: "Very Thorough"
    "Very Thorough"
    Overall

    I came into the book not knowing anything about Andrew Jackson. Now I feel like I lived along side him. The book is very thorough and the narrator is excellent. The story line kept me interest even through the political debates.

    The author seems to go off on tangents while the reader wonders why. Then, all the information is nicely woven together.

    23 of 23 people found this review helpful

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