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Rick

In a small, peaceful town on the Equator, the sun always sets at 6, and a good audiobook is always the perfect evening companion.

Cotacachi, Ecuador | Member Since 2013

70
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 40 reviews
  • 40 ratings
  • 0 titles in library
  • 14 purchased in 2015
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9

  • Earth Abides: The 60th Anniversary Edition

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By George R. Stewart
    • Narrated By Jonathan Davis, Connie Willis
    Overall
    (1677)
    Performance
    (1111)
    Story
    (1129)

    A disease of unparalleled destructive force has sprung up almost simultaneously in every corner of the globe, all but destroying the human race. One survivor, strangely immune to the effects of the epidemic, ventures forward to experience a world without man. What he ultimately discovers will prove far more astonishing than anything he'd either dreaded or hoped for.

    J. Rhoderick says: "Brilliant, beautiful, sad, terrifying"
    "A Thinking Man’s Apocalypse"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Sixty-five years after its publication, “Earth Abides” remains fresh in its singular view of what might happen after most of the world’s population is wiped out by a fast-moving plague. The premise is a familiar one. Stephen King, for one, credits the work as an inspiration for his hugely successful “The Stand.” But his took off in an entirely different direction.

    “Earth Abides” follows the post-pandemic life of Isherwood “Ish” Williams and what becomes a small group of survivors who cluster together in Berkeley, California as the world they knew steadily crumbles. The electricity fails, and years later the water supply. In between, everything changes. George R. Stewart, a serious academic, provides insights that are often surprising in this, his first and only science fiction novel.

    There is the rise and fall of species—first ants, then rats, cattle, grasshoppers, and mountain lions. It is the constant cycle of animals that overbreed as they react to the rise and fall of their supply of prey and predators, then practically die out again.

    And then something like it starts happening to the culture of the people. The little community of survivors—“the tribe,” as they increasingly call themselves—have children. Over the decades, the children marry and produce more children. But they don’t learn to read, or retain much sense of all the human history that was so recently lost. They don’t care about ice, for example, since they’ve never had it, so ice is one of those myriad achievements of civilization they feel no compulsion to recreate. They use matches, but couldn’t make one. After all this time, they don’t know how to fabricate things, or build things, or raise domesticated animals for food. They have become complacent scavengers in a land of incalculable plenty, thanks to thousands of abandoned stores, and they don’t realize how much they have forgotten.

    Superstition rises to fill the space where knowledge belongs. Ish becomes something of a reluctant demigod.

    This is not the way post-apocalyptic books usually go. They tend to be filled with renegade bad guys and warring factions whom the survivors must fear—zombies in the latest versions. Here the survivors themselves have become their worst enemy, or so it seems for a time. The whole of human civilization that separates them from savagery turns out to be an ephemeral thing.

    In a way, it is an illustration of the theory that humans are never more than a generation away from atavism, as was illustrated in “Lord of the Flies.” But viewed differently, it’s not quite that, but rather the fact that in a slimmed-down world, the trappings of civilization are not particularly useful. In a tribe of 30 people, there’s very little urgency about preserving the science of plastics manufacture. There’s no need to make ammunition when a bow and arrow will do nicely.

    They have all the civilization they need.

    If Stewart set out to create an abiding volume, he couldn’t have done it better. There are very few clues within the book as to its real age. There are comments about records and record players, and incidents of careless use of the DDT that would be banned in 1972, but most of the book is timeless. There is never a mention of any specific year. It does have a formal, slightly dated writing style which constantly uses “which” when “that” would do, and there are no contractions.

    The narration by Jonathan Davis is engaging and warm, and the audiobook is an affecting experience. Except perhaps for the truly devoted science fiction fan, however, the strident introduction by Connie Willis is a distraction.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Savage Harvest: A Tale of Cannibals, Colonialism, and Michael Rockefeller's Tragic Quest for Primitive Art

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 18 mins)
    • By Carl Hoffman
    • Narrated By Joe Barrett
    Overall
    (110)
    Performance
    (96)
    Story
    (98)

    The mysterious disappearance of Michael Rockefeller in remote New Guinea in 1961 has kept the world, and even Michael's powerful, influential family, guessing for years. Now, Carl Hoffman uncovers startling new evidence that finally tells the full, astonishing story.

    Randy says: "Excellent story"
    "Mystery and Insight"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    In 1961, Michael Rockefeller, the 23-year-old son of Nelson Rockefeller, disappeared on an art-collecting mission in New Guinea and was never seen again. Swimming ashore from his capsized boat in warm, smooth waters, his presumed death was officially attributed to drowning. Yet rumors persisted for decades that he was actually killed after reaching shore, dismembered and eaten by cannibals.

    Fifty years later, Carl Hoffman immersed himself in the jungle and its people, and unearthed documents to build a persuasive argument that young Rockefeller did, indeed, meet his fate at the hands of cannibals. It’s an engrossing mystery. But at the same time, it is a penetrating glimpse into the world of almost any primitive culture, where time is elastic, myth trumps facts, values are upside down, and nothing is as it seems.

    “Savage Harvest” is exhaustive and compelling journalism, insightful in its portrayal of a shadowy, often savage world. The bonus is another articulate, engaging read by Joe Barrett.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • A Prayer for Owen Meany

    • UNABRIDGED (26 hrs and 53 mins)
    • By John Irving
    • Narrated By Joe Barrett
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (4119)
    Performance
    (2995)
    Story
    (3006)

    Of all of John Irving's books, this is the one that lends itself best to audio. In print, Owen Meany's dialogue is set in capital letters; for this production, Irving himself selected Joe Barrett to deliver Meany's difficult voice as intended. In the summer of 1953, two 11-year-old boys – best friends – are playing in a Little League baseball game in Gravesend, New Hampshire. One of the boys hits a foul ball that kills the other boy's mother. The boy who hits the ball doesn't believe in accidents; Owen Meany believes he is God's instrument. What happens to Owen after that 1953 foul ball is extraordinary and terrifying.

    Alan says: "Outstanding"
    "Unforgettable"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    From its iconic, elegiac opening paragraph to its extraordinary finale, when disparate elements accelerate and converge like a meteor swarm, “A Prayer for Owen Meany” is an awe-inspiring John Irving masterpiece. He always begins writing a book from the end, he says in an appended interview, taking as much as 18 months to devise a “roadmap” of the story. It’s the only way to imagine the creation of such a complex, multilayered opus—long but never tedious, laced with chilling portent, and all at once engaging, funny, moving and tragic.

    It begins with a fateful Little League game in 1953, and goes to times and places where only John Irving could take it.

    There is a concept in journalism called “advancing the story,” where a writer continually reveals new developments, rather than heaping on details that simply make the story longer. Irving is a virtuoso at its fictional counterpart. Just a couple of hours into “Owen Meany,” you’ve heard so much, in such gripping and intimate detail, that you begin to wonder what could possibly fill the remaining 25 hours or so. You wonder how it could ever end, and then, later, you fear that it will.

    I am not a religious person—neither, he says, is the author—but its religiosity is what gives the book such strength of character. My life has been enriched by listening to Joe Barrett’s masterful reading of “A Prayer for Owen Meany.” It’s that good.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Dog of the South

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 1 min)
    • By Charles Portis
    • Narrated By David Aaron Baker
    Overall
    (15)
    Performance
    (14)
    Story
    (14)

    Charles Portis has drawn widespread critical acclaim for his inventive prose. In The Dog of the South, Ray Midge is on the trail of his wife, Norma, who’s headed for Mexico with her ex-husband. On the way Ray meets the eccentric Dr. Reo Symes, a man with more get-rich-quick schemes than common sense. Together, they’ll have to overcome tropical storms, grifters, and plenty of car trouble en route to their destination - wherever that may be.

    Rick says: "A Gem that Defies Description"
    "A Gem that Defies Description"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Reviewers typically give up when it comes to the work of Charles Portis, saying in one way or another that it simply can’t be described. That’s just how I feel after hearing “A Dog of the South” and learning of him for the first time, long after I should have. It is a rambling little yarn of the Deep South in the 1970s—so Deep that it rambles into Belize. The characters are a tattered, mismatched bunch of shifty failures, grifters, evangelists, shallow dreamers and a couple of weird children, all of whom, for some reason, are easily imagined as shadowy figures in the dim light of a bare bulb in some rundown hotel.

    Ray Midge’s friend has stolen his wife and his car and headed to Mexico and beyond, and Ray goes after them—to retrieve his car. The people and puzzlements he encounters are beyond imagining. The plot is a barely-necessary device to support the author’s hilarious and inventive prose. For example, he arrives at the steamy, seedy Fair Play Hotel in Belize and meets the night clerk:

    “She woke a small Negro boy named Webster Spooner, who slept in a box in the foyer. It was a pretty good wooden box, with bedding in it. I knew his name because he had written it on a piece of paper and taped it to his box. At the foot of his makeshift bed, there was a tomato plant growing in an old Texaco grease bucket.“

    The first sentence would be plenty good by itself, but Portis piles on unexpected details that yield rich and riveting descriptions of an exceedingly strange world. It is deliciously funny.

    As I said, it can’t be described. The soft Southern accent of David Aaron Baker provides the perfect first-person voice for Ray Midge—a decent fellow with good intentions and vague ambitions you know he will never realize. But listening to his zany adventure unfold is an excellent way to spend eight hours. You won’t regret it.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Doctor Sleep: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (18 hrs and 35 mins)
    • By Stephen King
    • Narrated By Will Patton
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (8053)
    Performance
    (7430)
    Story
    (7449)

    Stephen King returns to the characters and territory of one of his most popular novels ever, The Shining, in this instantly riveting novel about the now middle-aged Dan Torrance (the boy protagonist of The Shining) and the very special 12-year-old girl he must save from a tribe of murderous paranormals. This is an epic war between good and evil, a gory, glorious story that will thrill the millions of hyper-devoted fans of The Shining and wildly satisfy anyone new to the territory of this icon in the King canon.

    D says: "The sequel to the book; not the movie"
    "The Doctor is In"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The particular genius of Stephen King at his best is an ability to concoct supernatural situations that are patently absurd, and then guide the reader down the twisting path of an inventive storyline toward unconditional credulity. By the time characters start swapping minds between their bodies or “flipping” into parallel dimensions, it has all become strangely plausible. This is one of those books.

    “Doctor Sleep” provides the long-awaited sequel to “The Shining,” one of King’s earliest successes, and especially the character of little Danny, now all grown up and tormented by alcoholism and ghosts. It’s probably not necessary to know the original in order to enjoy the second, but it helps in small, significant ways.

    Here is more of King’s pure invention: a band of elderly characters traveling the country in RVs, whose golf pants and liver spots mask a breed of ancient vampires called The True Knot (just “the True” to their friends). They feed—not on blood, but on the mystic essence of children who happen to possess the psychic powers of “the shining,” as Dan does. This essence is called “steam,” and its extraction is brutal, painful, and eventually fatal. For the True Knot, it's life itself. for centuries.

    Downloaded in three parts, I wasn’t initially sure I’d stick with it. Not every King work is an unqualified page-turner for everyone. Before the end of the first third I was hooked. The reading by Will Patton is another tour de force, making a gripping story even more emotionally wired. He can do more with a harsh, throaty whisper than most could do with a scream, making your skin crawl. I couldn’t put it down, and I hated to see it end.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Travels with Charley in Search of America

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 58 mins)
    • By John Steinbeck
    • Narrated By Gary Sinise
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (415)
    Performance
    (362)
    Story
    (365)

    In September 1960, John Steinbeck and his poodle, Charley, embarked on a journey across America, from small towns to growing cities to glorious wilderness oases. Travels with Charley is animated by Steinbeck’s attention to the specific details of the natural world and his sense of how the lives of people are intimately connected to the rhythms of nature—to weather, geography, the cycles of the seasons. His keen ear for the transactions among people is evident, too, as he records the interests and obsessions that preoccupy the Americans he encounters along the way.

    Suzn F says: "On the Road Adventure"
    "It's not about the dog"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    A leisurely listen to the account of Steinbeck’s iconic road trip after all these years is pure pleasure, and the wisdom of his penetrating observations is undeniable. Perhaps the best known is, “We do not take a trip; a trip takes us.” There is also compelling reasoning for traveling alone, and in revisiting the haunts of his youth on the West Coast, surprising insights into the true nature of ghosts: they are us.

    The most powerful experience is that of his sweep through the racist Deep South of 55 years ago, and it’s enough to make you squirm. As it did him.

    I do not know what the voice of John Steinbeck sounded like, but from now on it will be that of Gary Sinise, who provides exactly the right mix of warmth, irony, and—at the end—exhaustion from a marathon observant journey across America.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • John Adams

    • UNABRIDGED (30 hrs and 1 min)
    • By David McCullough
    • Narrated By Nelson Runger
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2177)
    Performance
    (1092)
    Story
    (1104)

    McCullough's John Adams has the sweep and vitality of a great novel. This is history on a grand scale, an audiobook about politics, war, and social issues, but also about human nature, love, religious faith, virtue, ambition, friendship, and betrayal, and the far-reaching consequences of noble ideas. Above all, it is an enthralling, often surprising story of one of the most important and fascinating Americans who ever lived.

    Davis says: "An outstanding biography"
    "Founding Father"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    In this monumental, meticulous work by David McCullough, John Adams is intimately revealed as a passionate, visionary, bullheaded patriot, sometimes arrogant, and at times gullible when others conspired against him, which was often. He was as responsible as any, and more than most, in propelling the difficult birth of a great nation against all odds.

    The portrayals in this book can be surprising. In contrast to historical images of bold and thoughtful men working together, there were constant clashes of egos and competing personal agendas among the founding fathers. They were mortals—the irascible and sometimes indolent Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, and many more. Hamilton, especially, was a treacherous and self-aggrandizing man whose vicious and false public accusations cost Adams his reelection and ultimately ended Hamilton’s own career. The revered Thomas Jefferson comes off as something quite different from his reputation: a vain, mercurial, spendthrift, self-centered man who can be a trusted friend one day and a scheming, duplicitous betrayer the next. The architects of America comprised a cast of heroes and scoundrels. Many were both.

    For those who worry about modern digital messaging consuming too much of our time, have no fear. It was rampant 250 years ago, via quill and ink, when people wrote endless letters and kept daily journals in elaborate prose, rife with literary and scriptural quotations, describing and debating the issues and events of the day. It was oddly formal. Abigail Adams addressed her beloved husband in letters as “My dearest friend.” Any educated person must have written millions of words in a lifetime. It’s difficult to imagine how they had time to do anything else. Parsing them must have been a colossal task for David McCullough, but it creates a history that would otherwise be far from complete.

    There are fascinating insights here into 18th century politics. For example, presidential candidates in those earliest years took no part in the campaign, staying home for months and waiting to see what the outcome would be.

    Although McCullough himself is also a fine narrator, Nelson Runger does a superb job through all thirty hours.

    Adams and Jefferson, in particular, were often at odds and sometimes didn't communicate for decades. But their lives at last converged once more in the years of their retirements, when they carried on a memorable exchange of correspondence on every conceivable subject. And in one of history’s stunning coincidences, both men died in their homes on July 4, 1826, precisely the 50th anniversary of the independence of the nation they had worked so brilliantly to create.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Prince Lestat: The Vampire Chronicles

    • UNABRIDGED (18 hrs and 52 mins)
    • By Anne Rice
    • Narrated By Simon Vance
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (562)
    Performance
    (523)
    Story
    (523)

    The novel opens with the vampire world in crisis… vampires have been proliferating out of control; burnings have commenced all over the world, huge massacres similar to those carried out by Akasha in The Queen of the Damned… Old vampires, roused from slumber in the earth are doing the bidding of a Voice commanding that they indiscriminately burn vampire-mavericks in cities from Paris and Mumbai to Hong Kong, Kyoto, and San Francisco.

    Bruce says: "There is Wonderous Power in The Blood - I loved it"
    "Lacks a Pulse"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I've read/heard and greatly enjoyed and admired several of Anne Rice's vampire chronicles. This one, not so much. The reading is superb, and for that matter, so is the writing. But the story falls short for me. Although devoted followers of the series will probably disagree--and I didn't come to the book expecting hand-to-hand combat among immortals--after 90 minutes of listening, when nothing whatever had happened, I gave up.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Modern Scholar: The Incas: Inside an American Empire

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 47 mins)
    • By Terence N. D'Altroy
    • Narrated By Terence N. D'Altroy
    Overall
    (59)
    Performance
    (34)
    Story
    (36)

    The story of the Incas is a powerful one, and their legacy remains a potent influence in the Andes of South America. In this insightful lecture series, Columbia University professor Terence D'Altroy focuses on Inca life at the height of the empire, the society's origins, its military, religion, ruling structure, and finally, the Inca legacy today.

    Ullanta says: "Interesting, comprehensive intro to the Incas"
    "A Fleeting Empire"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    As a resident of the Andes, I thought I’d better learn a little more about the Incas, whose legendary empire encompassed immense portions of South America and established monumental cities and road systems—but really lasted only a century in its full imperial incarnation.

    Terence D’Altroy knows his Inca (and pre-Inca) history, and his lectures are lively and articulate. The recording does have some editing errors causing repetitions, and the droning “announcer” before and after each section, with the contrived insertion of one question from an unheard student, recalls the most deadly of voices from the old days of classroom films. But that is cosmetic, and overall, this very accessible series of lectures offers more than almost anyone could wish to know about the lightning rise and dizzying fall of one of the greatest and briefest of the world’s dynasties.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Childhood's End

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 47 mins)
    • By Arthur C. Clarke
    • Narrated By Eric Michael Summerer, Robert J. Sawyer
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3482)
    Performance
    (2449)
    Story
    (2491)

    The Overlords appeared suddenly over every city - intellectually, technologically, and militarily superior to humankind. Benevolent, they made few demands: unify earth, eliminate poverty, and end war. With little rebellion, humankind agreed, and a golden age began.

    Ryan says: "Still a classic of visionary science fiction"
    "When story trumps style"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    “I have a 4 millimeter camera and thousands of meters of film,” remarks one character. Arthur C. Clarke’s science fiction masterpiece doesn’t predict everything with accuracy, whether it’s the evolution of digital cameras or the failed dream of worldwide adoption of the metric system. But it does paint a fascinating future in which the malaise of prosperity and unlimited leisure time leads in an unexpected way to the complete disappearance of professional sports, for example, and most scientific research.

    I must admit that I’m not a serious science fiction fan, though I do appreciate a good story. And my conclusion is that this is a better story than it is spellbinding prose. The plot, despite those occasional holes, is inventive and often surprising. It covers a lot of territory, sometimes in dramatic leaps, after a bit of a slow start. The writing, however, is stilted and formal in style, and so is the narration. But the story carries the day, as it must, and the result is a good listen to a seminal work.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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