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Daniel

Educator, Guitarist.

ratings
60
REVIEWS
8
FOLLOWING
1
FOLLOWERS
2
HELPFUL VOTES
64

  • The Willpower Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What You Can Do to Get More of It

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 20 mins)
    • By Kelly McGonigal, Ph.D.
    • Narrated By Walter Dixon
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2337)
    Performance
    (1952)
    Story
    (1927)

    Based on Stanford University psychologist Kelly McGonigal's wildly popular course The Science of Willpower, The Willpower Instinct is the first book to explain the new science of self-control and how it can be harnessed to improve our health, happiness, and productivity. Informed by the latest research and combining cutting-edge insights from psychology, economics, neuroscience, and medicine, The Willpower Instinct explains exactly what willpower is, how it works, and why it matters.

    Niv says: "life changing one of the best I read"
    "Applicable and entertaining"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Professor McGonigal's stories about and advice for strengthening willpower are helpful and thought provoking. Especially interesting is the idea that willpower is inborn in people, and explanations for how our environment sometimes causes it to work against our best interests.

    10 of 10 people found this review helpful
  • Face the Music: A Life Exposed

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 19 mins)
    • By Paul Stanley
    • Narrated By Paul Stanley
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (226)
    Performance
    (222)
    Story
    (222)

    In Face the Music, Paul Stanley - the co-founder and famous "Starchild" frontman of KISS - reveals for the first time the incredible highs and equally incredible lows in his life both inside and outside the band. Face the Music is the shocking, funny, smart, inspirational story of one of rock’s most enduring icons and the group he helped create, define, and immortalize. Stanley mixes compelling personal revelations and gripping, gritty war stories that will surprise even the most steadfast member of the KISS Army.

    Zachary K. Brown says: "A Book That Every KISS Fan Need Experience"
    "Reflective and honest"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Paul's account of the KISS story and his own life is refreshing and revealing. It also reveals an unexpected complexity to the man who wrote "Put your hand in my pocket/Grab onto my rocket."

    He makes a connection between the development of his showmanship (arguably the best in the business) and a congenital birth defect that affected his appearence and his hearing. He is a focused and directed guy, susceptible to some temptations of the Rock world, but able to resist the most destructive. It's inspiring, and he's a good model for rockin' and staying in control of your own life. Mostly.

    He slings a little mud at his brother-in-rock Gene Simmons, but with always with some love and respect. He soberly journals the slow deterioration of Peter Criss and Ace Frehely, often with hysterical anecdotes. Paul also reveals his own development as a man, when he recounts, now as a 62 year old father of a toddler, an incident in the 80s when he scoffed at another band who brought their kids and nannies on tour.

    Although I no longer listen to his music, I now consider Stanely a model bandleader, showman, and businessman.

    One more crucial point: Paul's narration is excellent. Too often, authors don't know enough about performance to execute their own writings in a listenable way. But after 40+ years of performance, this guy knows his voice. It was a great listen.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Focus: The Hidden Driver of Excellence

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 8 mins)
    • By Daniel Goleman
    • Narrated By Daniel Goleman
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (132)
    Performance
    (108)
    Story
    (107)

    Combining cutting-edge research with practical findings, Focus delves into the science of attention in all its varieties, presenting a long overdue discussion of this little-noticed and under-rated mental asset. In an era of unstoppable distractions, Goleman persuasively argues that now more than ever we must learn to sharpen focus if we are to survive in a complex world.

    Daniel says: "Don't let the authors narrate their own books!"
    "Don't let the authors narrate their own books!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is an important topic addressed by the Grandfather of Social and Emotional Intelligence and Learning. However, there was an important problem.

    The decision to have Dr. Goleman narrate his own text was not helpful. Although a journalist, he's clearly no sort of performer, and has no understanding of how to use his voice appropriately. His volume trailed off occassionally, or he rushed through sentences. I notice this often when authors narrate their own works. Perhaps it's because they are so familiar with their work, they forget that the rest of us are not. Most bothersome, though, was his tendency to whisper at the end of a sentence, as if to emphasize his point. We often do this when speaking, but it has no place in an audiobook performance. I found myself "rewinding" the book again and again to catch what seemed to be an important phase, and eventually just gave up and carried on with the book, ultimately missing what seemed to be important ideas. So, a note to Audible's producers: unless the author is an experienced performer, don't let them narrate! Also, he butchered the pronunciation of bestselling psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi's name, which he shouldn't have done if he's connected in the field.

    Nonetheless, Dr. Goleman's analysis of our attention to outer, inner, and other types was very insightful. It's particularly helpful to teachers (like me) who are interested in helping kids. I'm looking forward to watching some of his supplamental videos on the topic.

    24 of 26 people found this review helpful
  • The 4-Hour Workweek: Escape 9-5, Live Anywhere, and Join the New Rich (Expanded and Updated)

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Timothy Ferriss
    • Narrated By Ray Porter
    Overall
    (2636)
    Performance
    (1640)
    Story
    (1645)

    This expanded edition includes dozens of practical tips and case studies from readers who have doubled their income, overcome common sticking points, and reinvented themselves using the original book. Also included are templates for eliminating email and negotiating with bosses and clients, how to apply lifestyle principles in unpredictable economic times, and the latest tools, tricks, and shortcuts for living like a diplomat or millionaire without being either.

    Jason says: "My favorite book for encouragement!"
    "Snake oil for the Soul"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Tim Ferriss is clearly a rich white dude in his 20s- or at least he was when he started writing this book. Ambitious, naive, and energetic, he has all the traits necessary for success, and he makes some good points about achievement and success, and having a positive outlook on life. He gets credit for that. For example, his assertion is correct that instead of striving to earn large amounts of money, we should decide what experiences or things we want out of life, and then work backwards from that to decide how much money we need. Also, the automation of income is truly the way to financial independence, and he's right on the money there.

    But his stories quickly get weird, even ridiculous. His accounts of tango contests and global sailing are quaint, but he loses credibility very quickly when he advises the reader on how to win a kickboxing contest: basically, he says game the system. And here is where his age shows. While taking advantage of technicalities in order to earn money might be legal and profitable, he misses the point on kickboxing. Isn't the point of learning to kickbox health, competition, discipline, defense? What value is a trophy if you only got it, as he basically did, though his opponents' forfeit? Did he really master kickboxing? Or did he just create the illusion of being better than his opponents? How deep is the joy one gets out of that? There are a number of assertions out there, in fact, that he never did win any national championship.

    If the goal is make people think you're successful, Ferriss is on to something. I hear he made his fortune selling a nutritional supplement that was never proven effective scientifically. Legal? Yes. Profitable? Hella. Does that make him trustworthy? Uh...

    Ultimately, happy people are those who enjoy the work they do, not people who spend even just four hours a week being miserable so they can sip mai tais the rest of the time. I want to read the book Tim Ferriss writes when he's 60, and has more perspective than he does now. TED should have waited as long to give him talk.

    26 of 31 people found this review helpful
  • Practical Wisdom: The Right Way to Do the Right Thing

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 46 mins)
    • By Barry Schwartz, Kenneth Sharpe
    • Narrated By Barry Schwartz
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (44)
    Performance
    (22)
    Story
    (22)

    Most of us want to succeed. And most of us want to do the right thing. But we often forget that the way tosucceed is by doing the right thing, as Barry Schwartz and Kenneth Sharpe remind us in Practical Wisdom: The Right Way to Do the Right Thing. When the institutions that shape our society need to change, the people in them typically either make more rules or offer smarter incentives.

    Daniel says: "Professionalism"
    "Professionalism"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    A great synopsis of doing good, doing well, and being a great professional, with plenty of examples from not only law, medicine, and education, but custodial work as well. Schwartz induces rage by relaying stories of how strict adherence to rules blinds us to the wider, deeper knowledge of our experience and subconcious minds. An inspiring book...

    However, this is a great example of why authors generally shouldn't narrate their own works: their own familiarity with the work caused them both to be lazy in their enunciations. Numerous times they trailed off, barely voicing crucial words, and I found myself hitting the "Go Back" button repeatedly and straining to hear a word that the author was probably hearing loudly in his head. Sharpe's voice especially is pretty drab.

    Nonetheless, the content and flow made up for the performance.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Sociopath Next Door

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 26 mins)
    • By Martha Stout
    • Narrated By Shelly Frasier
    Overall
    (2741)
    Performance
    (1727)
    Story
    (1725)

    We are accustomed to think of sociopaths as violent criminals, but in The Sociopath Next Door, Harvard psychologist Martha Stout reveals that a shocking 4 percent of ordinary people, one in 25, has an often undetected mental disorder, the chief symptom of which is that that person possesses no conscience. He or she has no ability whatsoever to feel shame, guilt, or remorse. One in 25 everyday Americans, therefore, is secretly a sociopath.

    Taryn says: "Reinforces what you have already known"
    "Eye-opening and chilling"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The case studies recounted here compelled me to re-evaluate some of the strange interactions I've had with associates over the years. While I've always known that some people do bad things, the concept of sociopathy as applied to successful professionals introduces a whole new dynamic into how I try to figure out what motivates people. As a public school teacher, the issue for me is quite serious: it's the challenge of working with sociopathic students, teachers, or administrators, and it is compounded by the vulnerability of the children in this industry.

    Particularly interesting is the description of how sociopaths often need high levels of stimulation, take serious risks, and are often charismatic and charming. The book made me very suspicious of people with these characteristics, especially when such people are trying to persuade me or sell me something. In fact, because of Dr. Stout, I've made conscious decisions to ignore, defy, or challenge otherwise convincing and impressive people based largely on my new intuition that they might be sociopathic.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery

    • UNABRIDGED (18 hrs and 7 mins)
    • By Eric Foner
    • Narrated By Norman Dietz
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (128)
    Performance
    (82)
    Story
    (85)

    Eric Foner gives us the definitive history of Abraham Lincoln and the end of slavery in America. Foner's Lincoln emerges as a leader, one whose greatness lies in his capacity for moral and political growth through real engagement with allies and critics alike. This powerful work will transform our understanding of the nation's greatest president and the issue that mattered most.

    D. Littman says: "great book about slavery and lincoln"
    "Candid, fair, and sympathetic"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    I recommend this title to history teachers, history fans, civil rights advocates and lawmakers. This is a candid account of how brilliant people with good intentions struggle to implement liberty in an imperfect world.


    What did you like about the performance? What did you dislike?

    There were some awkward pronunciations. I was distracted by the narrator's pronunciation of the


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    At 18 hours, there was no way I could listen to this in one sitting. As a high school History teacher, it was helpful to take breaks and reflect on the content.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Talent Is Overrated: What Really Separates World-Class Performers from Everybody Else

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By Geoff Colvin
    • Narrated By David Drummond
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2170)
    Performance
    (1245)
    Story
    (1252)

    One of the most popular Fortune articles in many years was a cover story called "What It Takes to Be Great." Geoff Colvin offered new evidence that top performers in any field - from Tiger Woods and Winston Churchill to Warren Buffett and Jack Welch - are not determined by their inborn talents. Greatness doesn't come from DNA but from practice and perseverance honed over decades.

    Sasha L. Stowers says: "An Even-Handed Look At Talent"
    "How to look at education"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Where does Talent Is Overrated rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    Colvin's take on how we learn and improve is central to improving education today. This is one of the more relevant subjects and successful titles I've heard.


    What other book might you compare Talent Is Overrated to and why?

    Dan Coyle's The Talent Code builds on Colvin's ideas. The idea that no one is born with innate ability can be easily refuted (after all, have you ever seen an infant slug a homer out of the ballpark?), but expanding on this idea by coupling deep practice (Coyle's term) or deliberate practice (Colvin's term for what is essentially the same thing) with master coaching and some sort of inspiration is what really makes this idea relevant to Education today.


    What does David Drummond bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    Drummond performed well. I can't recall any mispronunciations (which should be almost unforgivable in this profession). I don't recall anything about the voice- I just remember the content of the audiobook, and I think this is the greatest compliment to the narrator: that his or her voice kind of disappears while the overall story remains in my memory is the point of an audiobook.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    As a high school teacher, I passionately agree with the notion that all kids can learn, that all children deserve the chance to be taught, and the next superstar could be any student who is taught how to practice something they love. The right inspiration, the right teaching, and some serious practicing are what it takes. The idea that kids either have it or they don't is a lazy, treasonous idea for a teacher to have.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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