You no longer follow Cholmondeley

You will no longer see updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can re-follow a user if you change your mind.

OK

You now follow Cholmondeley

You will receive updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can unfollow a user if you change your mind.

OK

Cholmondeley

Santa Barbara, CA United States | Member Since 2006

77
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 23 reviews
  • 396 ratings
  • 0 titles in library
  • 11 purchased in 2015
FOLLOWING
2
FOLLOWERS
2

  • Betrayal: A Dismas Hardy Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 43 mins)
    • By John Lescroart
    • Narrated By David Colacci
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (126)
    Performance
    (48)
    Story
    (47)

    When Dismas Hardy agrees to clean up the caseload of recently disappeared attorney Charlie Bowen, he thinks it will be easy. But one of the cases is far from small-time - the appeal to overturn the murder conviction of National Guard reservist Evan Scholler, who has been sentenced to life without parole for the murder of an ex-Navy SEAL and private contractor named Ron Nolan. Two rapid-fire events in Iraq conspired to bring the men into fatal conflict.

    Cholmondeley says: "Not enough Dismas; too much back-story"
    "Not enough Dismas; too much back-story"
    Overall

    I listened to and enjoyed the first two Dismas Hardy titles available from Audible (Guilt and Mercy). I'm pleased with the several new releases that have become recently available and will probably buy and listen to all of them.

    But this is not the Dismas Hardy book for new "readers" or old fans. The first fifteen minutes or so set up a couple of back- stories that involve none of the Dismas Hardy characters. These back-stories take up AT LEAST 75% of the book! And they are tedious.

    10 of 11 people found this review helpful
  • The Remedy: Robert Koch, Arthur Conan Doyle, and the Quest to Cure Tuberculosis

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 55 mins)
    • By Thomas Goetz
    • Narrated By Donald Corren
    Overall
    (143)
    Performance
    (131)
    Story
    (128)

    In 1875, tuberculosis was the deadliest disease in the world, accountable for a third of all deaths. A diagnosis of TB - often called consumption - was a death sentence. Then, in a triumph of medical science, a German doctor named Robert Koch deployed an unprecedented scientific rigor to discover the bacteria that caused TB. Koch soon embarked on a remedy - a remedy that would be his undoing. When Koch announced his cure for consumption, Arthur Conan Doyle, then a small-town doctor in England and sometime writer, went to Berlin to cover the event.

    William R. Toddmancillas says: "History plus."
    "Germ Theory = Global Warming of Its Day"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The connection between Conan Doyle and Robert Koch is pretty tentative, but this is much more than a limited dual biography.

    It's a history of science with respect to germ theory. For nearly fifty years I've actively wondered why Semmelweis (the guy who suggested that doctors wash their hand(s) before doing a pelvic exam on a woman about to give birth) was ignored (and died in obscurity) while Pasteur - with essentially the same insight - is still an international hero. In other words, why couldn't Semmelweis promote his discovery and Pasteur could promote his, when they were both variations on Germ Theory.

    This book explains with convincing detail how and why Germ Theory was an exceedingly difficult scientific "truth" to "sell," rather like the Global Warming of its day.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Three Early Stories

    • UNABRIDGED (39 mins)
    • By J.D. Salinger
    • Narrated By Mike Dennis
    Overall
    (77)
    Performance
    (75)
    Story
    (73)

    A young and ambitious writer named Jerome David Salinger set his goals very high very early in his career. He almost desperately wished to publish his early stories in The New Yorker magazine, the pinnacle, he felt, of America’s literary world. But such was not to be for several long years and the length of one long world war. But other magazines were quick to recognize a new talent, a fresh voice at a time when the world verged on madness....

    Jonathan says: "Early Gems From A Master"
    "Proves that writing isn't easy."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Catcher in the Rye is the most enduring novel I read in high school and every time I re-read a part of it, I wonder about the number of drafts Salinger must have written to get the dialogues so trimmed and on pitch.

    For Esme with Love and Squalor - also after repeated readings - remains a perfect short story.

    These three 'early stories' are: bad. They are not indicative of what will come later.

    All young writers can rejoice.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Guns of August

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 2 mins)
    • By Barbara W. Tuchman
    • Narrated By John Lee
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (520)
    Performance
    (454)
    Story
    (460)

    Historian and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Barbara Tuchman here brought to life again the people and events that led up to World War I. With attention to fascinating detail, and an intense knowledge of her subject and its characters, Ms. Tuchman reveals, for the first time, just how the war started, why, and why it could have been stopped but wasn't. A classic historical survey of a time and a people we all need to know more about, The Guns of August will not be forgotten.

    Chrissie says: "Pay attention!"
    "Amazing"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I read a lot of history, but I can't think of another book - academic or "popular" that's so engaging.

    For years, History of the Peloponnesian War, Crime and Punishment, and The Distant Mirror sat by my bed. I couldn't read them and I couldn't give up on them. Eventually I finished Thucydides and Dostoevsky. The Tuchman book is gone too. I never read it, but eventually I had to get rid of it.

    I "finished Thucydides but gave up on Tuchman's Distant Mirror." In light of what follows that's quite a statement.

    I selected this audiobook because it was long - a big bang for the buck. After an hour or two I was so engaged that bought The Book to read with, in front of, and catching up to the audio. The compelling way she selects and assembles the zillions of available factual reports from the opening days of WWI is brilliant.

    I don't know how she did it, but if I wanted to pursue history as a career - even as an academic - I wouldn't start until I had was convinced that I had figured it out and could emulate her methodology - even if I couldn't compete with her style.

    John Lee is superb in this as in all of his performances.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Bad Blood: A Crime Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 39 mins)
    • By Arne Dahl
    • Narrated By John Lee
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (19)
    Performance
    (16)
    Story
    (17)

    When a Swedish literary critic is found tortured to death in a janitor’s closet at Newark International Airport, the police realize that the murderer made off with the victim’s ticket and boarded a flight to Stockholm. Swedish authorities are placed on high alert, but the killer manages to slip through the customs dragnet and vanishes into the night. With no clear motive in sight, Detectives Paul Hjelm and Kerstin Holm of Intercrime’s A-Unit take over the investigation.

    Cholmondeley says: "More of the same"
    "More of the same"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I've listened to a lots from the Scandinavian mystery genre and have enjoyed it. I suspect that the completion of the Jens Lapidus trilogy may be the apogee for my appreciation. One reviewer wrote that all other Scandinavian mysteries (e.g. procedural, suspense, modern detective, sad-sack but winsome drunk) are preparation for Lapidus who takes the familiar tropes to the limit.

    It's possible that plots turning on transatlantic flights are worn out before they are written. Regardless, Bad Blood seemed like 'more of the same.'

    In spite of weak material John Lee is always an excellent, soothing, and confident narrator.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Last Town: Wayward Pines, Book 3

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 56 mins)
    • By Blake Crouch
    • Narrated By Paul Michael Garcia
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (792)
    Performance
    (718)
    Story
    (721)

    Secret Service agent Ethan Burke arrived in Wayward Pines, Idaho, three weeks ago. In this town, people are told who to marry, where to live, where to work. Their children are taught that David Pilcher, the town's creator, is god. No one is allowed to leave; even asking questions can get you killed. But Ethan has discovered the astonishing secret of what lies beyond the electrified fence that surrounds Wayward Pines and protects it from the terrifying world beyond.

    Shelley says: "Enjoyed, But Too Many Holes..."
    "End of the world furturism"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Purchased on sale; not interesting to me and I'm not a good judge of anything in this genre.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Sick: A Project Eden Thriller

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 50 mins)
    • By Brett Battles
    • Narrated By MacLeod Andrews
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (387)
    Performance
    (334)
    Story
    (343)

    Daniel Ash wakes after midnight to the cry of his daughter. Just a bad dream, he thinks. She's had them before. Yet he can't help but worry when she cries out again as he pads down the hallway. Stepping through her doorway, he expects to find her sitting up in bed, frightened by a nightmare. But the nightmare is his. It's real. And it's just beginning....

    Amanda says: "Enjoyably addictive story!"
    "Futuristic; not for me."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Purchased on sale. Futuristic, end of the world, evil doctor - not interesting to me.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Gray Mountain

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 46 mins)
    • By John Grisham
    • Narrated By Catherine Taber
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1822)
    Performance
    (1630)
    Story
    (1641)

    The year is 2008 and Samantha Kofer's career at a huge Wall Street law firm is on the fast track - until the recession hits and she gets downsized, furloughed, escorted out of the building. Samantha, though, is one of the "lucky" associates. She's offered an opportunity to work at a legal aid clinic for one year without pay, after which there would be a slim chance that she'd get her old job back. In a matter of days Samantha moves from Manhattan to Brady, Virginia, population 2,200, in the heart of Appalachia, a part of the world she has only read about.

    Jan says: "Sorry John... wanted to like it... love you anyway"
    "Missing A Feel for the Law"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Young, brilliant lawyer leaves big firm and does something stupendously good – not very likely. I read only two or three of the first novels, but this seemed to be the flavor of Early Grisham. Implausible stories populated with cardboard characters. I avoided his books thinking him closer to Dan Brown than skillful writers like Scott Turow who also have a deep Feel for the Law, how it works, and the possible outcomes when it's infused with imaged facts and people.

    Then I stumbled on the Mature Grisham with plots extreme but possible and instructive and each with the right Feel. Examples include Sycamore Row, The Racketeer, and The Appeal. The Appeal is a superb fictional equivalent to Jonathan Harr’s brilliant non-fiction account of A Civil Action (Not in Audible’s inventory; set of CDs from Amazon = $149.00! It’s not that good but worth a reversion to Reading.).

    I looked forward to Gray Mountain as another from the Mature Grisham, but it had the characteristics of Early Grisham: predictable, implausible and tiresome. It was as though he had an old, rejected manuscript, and he didn’t have the heart to toss it. Now, as a best selling writer who has mastered The Craft, he cleans his story up and out to his agent. Of course it’s going to be published, but it isn’t good; it lacks The Feel. I hope he’s run out of old manuscripts.

    The narrator was fine but she didn't have enough to work with.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Moving Day

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 24 mins)
    • By Jonathan Stone
    • Narrated By Christopher Lane
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (292)
    Performance
    (260)
    Story
    (256)

    Forty years’ accumulation of art, antiques, and family photographs are more than just objects for Stanley Peke - they are proof of a life fully lived. A life he could have easily lost long ago. When a con man steals his houseful of possessions in a sophisticated moving-day scam, Peke wanders helplessly through his empty New England home, inevitably reminded of another helpless time: decades in Peke’s past, a cold and threadbare Stanislaw Shmuel Pecoskowitz eked out a desperate existence in the war-torn Polish countryside, subsisting on scraps, dodging Nazi soldiers.

    Joe Crescenzi says: "What a fantastic story... a real treat!"
    "Best revenge novel since The Count of Monte Cristo"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I’ve listened hundreds of audiobooks and this is one of the best, and the best revenge story since the Count of Monte Cristo.

    Here’s the setup: [It’s not a spoiler. The plot has too many (good) twists for me to count.]

    The protagonist is 72. He and his wife are moving from the East Coast to live out their lives in the “kinder climate of Santa Barbara.” A team of men in neat, clean uniforms arrive with a big moving van. The geezer thinks they are a day early. The team leader, polite and intelligent, checks his clipboard carefully and confirms that today’s the day. The geezer’s wife appears and says the van and crew are a early.

    The geezer thinks he’s made a mistake – after all he’s 72 – and his wife got the date from him. He assures her that today’s the day. The crew packs up the house carefully and efficiently. The leader asks the geezer if he and his wife have a place to stay. Yes, the geezer assures him, he and his wife will spend the last night in the house just as they spent their first, with nothing but a blanket and candle. That's nice - I'd like to know these people.

    The next day the real movers arrive.

    I’m 71 and live in Santa Barbara, and I relish the suggestion that the thieves who prey on geezers who recognize their own potential for getting a date wrong, may made a mistake in the selection of their victim. Yes, he and his wife have accumulated beautiful and valuable furniture to steal. It was insured, and they are the kind of people who have never a single claim on their homeowner's policy. They know and feel that what they lost was just STUFF They will be well compensated for their loss, and they are moving to Santa Barbara. They can and should enjoy every minute of the rest of their lives.

    But the thieves may have made the mistake of stealing from a geezer who has spent his entire adult lifetime repressing his Inner Badass.

    Excellent writing and well performed.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Ophelia Cut: Dismas Hardy, Book 14

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 20 mins)
    • By John Lescroart
    • Narrated By David Colacci
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (214)
    Performance
    (187)
    Story
    (189)

    Moses McGuire has good reason to be concerned about his beautiful 23-year-old daughter, Brittany. She moves quickly from one boyfriend to the next, and always seems to prefer a new and mysterious stranger to a man she knows something about. But her most recent ex, Rick Jessup, isn’t willing to let her go, culminating in a terrible night when Brittany is raped. Within 24 hours, Rick Jessup is dead, Moses McGuire is the prime suspect in the investigation, and Dismas Hardy has been hired to defend his brother-in-law.

    Jane says: "Entertaining but unconvincing plot resolutions"
    "Remember the shootout at the pier?"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is a full-on "mature" Dismas Hardy story. You get what you pay for and the value is good. This is a bit of a clean up story for Hardy fans who read and remember the over-the-top 'on the pier' shoot out where Abe, Dismas and Moses kill a lot of bad guys (six?) and SPLIT. (Only in SF.) Well, this story starts off with everyone worried that Moses is going to start talking six years after the fact and it goes on from there.

    The Incident at the Pier is more or less central but so is the date rape of Franny's niece, who happens to be Moses's daughter who may or may not have murdered the man responsible. There seems to be an underlying premise that most fathers would want to murder a man responsible for the date rape of his beautiful and very sexually active twenty-something daughter. I doubt it's the attitude of most of those men or very many of those daughters.

    Then, there's a muddled conclusion with muddled implications that should haunt Dismas for the rest of his life even though it was none of his doing. As I recall, Moses was kind of interesting as a philosopher bartender, but he doesn't wear well during his trial with either the other characters or with the reader.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • The Keeper: Dismas Hardy, Book 15

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 36 mins)
    • By John Lescroart
    • Narrated By David Colacci
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (255)
    Performance
    (225)
    Story
    (221)

    On the evening before Thanksgiving, Hal Chase, a guard in the San Francisco County Jail, drives to the airport to pick up his step-brother for the weekend. When they return, Hal’s wife, Katie, has disappeared without a clue. By the time Dismas Hardy hears about this, Katie has been missing for five days. The case strikes close to home because Katie had been seeing Hardy’s wife, a marriage counselor. By this time, the original Missing Persons case has become a suspected homicide, and Hal is the prime suspect.

    P. Giorgio says: "Where did Hardy go?"
    "Lescroat in full stride"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is classic Lescroart. It's set in San Francisco - probably a San Francisco of yesterday but he describes a crazy place I knew and liked. He's not a lawyer but he gets the procedural stuff and the sense of criminal law practice as well as anyone in the writing business. Dismas and Fran are getting older and in a way, they are both getting cooler.

    David Colacci is, of course, the voice of the series and does for Lescroart what Richard Ferrone has done for the Prey Series.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.