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Robert

Baltimore, MD, United States | Member Since 2005

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  • How Doctors Think

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By Jerome Groopman
    • Narrated By Michael Prichard
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (388)
    Performance
    (95)
    Story
    (93)

    On average, a physician will interrupt a patient describing her symptoms within 12 seconds. In that short time, many doctors decide on the likely diagnosis and best treatment. Often, decisions made this way are correct, but at crucial moments they can also be wrong: with catastrophic consequences. In this myth-shattering book, Jerome Groopman pinpoints the forces and thought processes behind the decisions doctors make.

    Audiophile says: "Disappointing"
    "Disappointing"
    Overall

    I enjoy Groopman's articles in the New Yorker, and I took this selection after hearing his compelling interview on NPR. However, I was disappointed in the content of the book. This does not really tell us too much about how doctors think; what constitutes the complexity of a diagnosis or how doctors make decisions. Rather, it is more of a collection of stories about misdiagnosis or mistreatment of patients and friends of Dr. Groopman. And it turns out that Groopman is mostly the hero of the book -- either making the tough diagnosis himself or referring to one of his friends who saves the day. His friends happen to be located at Harvard, Mayo Clinic, and Sloan-Kettering. Not exactly the answer for the masses of Americans belonging to HMOs who cannot even get a specialty referral without a letter to a congressman.

    The book starts out addressing the theme that young doctors are becoming too entranced with algorithmic medicine. He complains that they follow guidelines for care like robots on an assembly line. Most would agree, however, that the bigger problem in American medical care is the failure of doctors to adhere to evidence-based guidelines, rather than over-reliance on them. Care for diabetics, asthmatics, and hypertensives fall far short of what it should be and what would improve the health of the nation.

    Dr. Groopman does share our pain, however. He had a day of distress because a doctor called him at home with a fatal mis-diagnosis while his wife was away skiing. He had the diagnosis corrected the next day at work, but lost a night's sleep over it.

    Once you get past the self-congratulations, the old-boy network of super-docs, the confessions of imperfection in himself, and the self-pity; there are a few good points.
    1. Get a second opinion.
    2. Be an informed consumer.
    3. Ask questions
    3. If you do not like your doctor, get another one.
    Not worth the read to learn these lessons.;

    29 of 30 people found this review helpful

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