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Paul

United States | Member Since 2004

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  • Billy, Alfred, and General Motors: The Story of Two Unique Men, A Legendary Company, and a Remarkable Time in American History

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 3 mins)
    • By William Pelfrey
    • Narrated By Dickson Lane
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (62)
    Performance
    (48)
    Story
    (50)

    You couldn't find two more different men. Billy Durant was the consummate salesman, a brilliant wheeler-dealer with grand plans, unflappable energy, and a fondness for the high life. Alfred Sloan was the intellectual, an expert in business strategy and management, master of all things organizational. Together, this odd couple built perhaps the most successful enterprise in U.S. history, General Motors, and with it an industry that has come to define modern life throughout the world.

    Ray says: "Not Only an Automotive History"
    "Interesting history - quirky narrator"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you try another book from William Pelfrey and/or Dickson Lane?

    Yes, to the author; NO to the narrator.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of Billy, Alfred, and General Motors?

    Interesting story about the formation of the auto industry, and GM in particular. Good character studies of the principles; Durant, Sloan, and Henry Ford.


    How could the performance have been better?

    The main negative is with the narrator who had a very strange quirk that I have never heard any other narrator do as a long-time Audible listener. Whenever he read a direct quote, he lowered his voice an octave and delivered the quote in a shy, quiet way... as if he were delivering a secret that he didn't want anyone to overhear except the listener. There was absolutely no need to do this - the narrative made it very clear that it was a quote - and why the narrator felt he had to significantly alter his delivery is a complete mystery. The reason this was a big problem is I listen in my car, and I continually had to crank up the volume every time he read a quote. It was VERY ANNOYING... and for absolutely no reason.


    If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from Billy, Alfred, and General Motors?

    I would have forced the narrator to deliver the story consistently, rather than lowering his voice every time he came to a quote.


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