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Regan

Washington, DC, United States | Member Since 2008

6
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 3 reviews
  • 18 ratings
  • 1 titles in library
  • 0 purchased in 2014
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  • A New Song

    • UNABRIDGED (17 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By Jan Karon
    • Narrated By John McDonough
    Overall
    (260)
    Performance
    (127)
    Story
    (129)

    Jan Karon's millions of fans can't wait to sit down with her heartwarming and hilarious characters, who have a way of becoming family. In fact, readers and booksellers across the country kept Out to Canaan and At Home in Mitford on The New York Times best seller list for months. In A New Song, Mitford's longtime Episcopal priest, Father Tim, retires. However, new challenges and adventures await when he agrees to serve as interim minister of a small church on Whitecap Island.

    Sara says: "A trip to the beach"
    "Disappointing"
    Overall

    I have a certain affection for the Mitford series as it was one of the first audiobooks I ever read and John McDonough's fabulous narration really hooked me on both the series and audiobooks in general. However, I found this installment in the series trying too hard to be a proselytizing "Christian" genre book, instead of a charming, sometimes funny, sometimes moving story that happens to have an Episcopalian minister as it's main character. Too many threads and plot lines were just set adrift in this book with no decent conclusion to them. All of them in fact. Then the book ends with a full thirteen minute sermon on being born-again and having a 'personal relationship with Jesus Christ' which has nothing do with any of the plots of the book, just smacked in there for good measure. It really wasn't up to par with the previous entries in this otherwise great series.

    3 of 7 people found this review helpful
  • The Sultan's Seal

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 56 mins)
    • By Jenny White
    • Narrated By Nadia May
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (56)
    Performance
    (20)
    Story
    (19)

    The body of a young Englishwoman washes up in Istanbul wearing a pendant inscribed with the seal of the deposed sultan. The death resembles the unsolved murder of another Englishwoman, 10 years before. A magistrate in the new secular courts, Kamil Pasha, sets out to find the killer, but his dispassionate belief in science and modernity is shaken by betrayal and widening danger. In a mystical voice, a young Muslim woman recounts her own relationship with one of the dead women and with the suspected killer.

    Susan says: "The Sultan's Seal"
    "Interesting setting, but drags a bit"
    Overall

    Jenny White clearly knows her setting and uses it to good advantage in this story. But there are too many characters that are not clearly enough drawn to distinguish them from each other, and it makes the intrigues difficult to follow at points. At times the writing drags a bit. It could have been tightened up some with a good edit. And there were a few too many loose ends for my liking. Still all-in-all not a bad read and a reasonable freshman effort. I understand that the next in the series copes with some of these issues (though I haven't read it yet). Those who like the Amelia Peabody series will probably like the Kamil Pasha books.

    Nadia May is an excellent narrator for the most part, but her "American" is pretty atrocious: I believe Bernie is from Boston, but she gives him a stereotypical "western" drawl. Still, I'm fond of her as a narrator and recommend her.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • War and Peace

    • UNABRIDGED (61 hrs and 8 mins)
    • By Leo Tolstoy
    • Narrated By Frederick Davidson
    Overall
    (1161)
    Performance
    (623)
    Story
    (619)

    Often called the greatest novel ever written, War and Peace is at once an epic of the Napoleonic wars, a philosophical study, and a celebration of the Russian spirit. Tolstoy's genius is clearly seen in the multitude of characters in this massive chronicle, all of them fully realized and equally memorable.

    Diana says: "Glad I finally decided to read it"
    "Horrible narration"
    Overall

    I gave up on this and got the two-volume Neville Jason version instead --what a difference! If I hadn't been reading this for a book group, I probably wouldn't have made the effort to try a different version, but it's well worth it. This one is so bad, I'm surprised that Audible even carries it. Run away.

    2 of 5 people found this review helpful

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