You no longer follow Mike From Mesa

You will no longer see updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can re-follow a user if you change your mind.

OK

You now follow Mike From Mesa

You will receive updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can unfollow a user if you change your mind.

OK

Mike From Mesa

MikeFromMesa

Member Since 2003

969
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 111 reviews
  • 188 ratings
  • 0 titles in library
  • 45 purchased in 2014
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
234

  • The End: The Defiance and Destruction of Hitler's Germany, 1944-1945

    • UNABRIDGED (18 hrs and 37 mins)
    • By Ian Kershaw
    • Narrated By Sean Pratt
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (123)
    Performance
    (104)
    Story
    (101)

    From the preeminent Hitler biographer, a fascinating and original exploration of how the Third Reich was willing and able to fight to the bitter end of World War II. Countless books have been written about why Nazi Germany lost World War II, yet remarkably little attention has been paid to the equally vital question of how and why it was able to hold out as long as it did.

    Liz says: "Engrossing yet horrifying"
    "Interesting information on the end of the war"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The End is a study of how Germany kept their civilian and military committed to World War II to the end in spite of it being clear that the war was lost, especially after the successful Allied landings in Normandy. While I think there is nothing very surprising in this book (German fear of the Russian Army during the war is well known as is the power of the Nazi government to enforce its edicts), the book held together for me reasonably well in spite of my having read a good amount about this war. There was nothing very new, but neither did the book ever get boring.

    Mr Kershaw is a known expert on Adolph Hitler and on Germany during the Nazi period and, although his views may diverge from the commonly held belief that Hitler was Nazi Germany, his knowledge about how Germany perservered until the end of the war as a single state without anyone signing a separate treaty with the Western Powers is of considerable interest. The ability of the Wehrmacht to successfully resist the British, Canadian and US Armies in France, Belgium and Western Germany was always been a puzzle to me considering that it was also fighting the Russians in the East and that the populations and economies of the countries it was fighting were much larger than that of Germany.

    While not breaking any new ground (for me, at least), it did successfully piece together all of the separate threads which held Germany together and proved helpful and informative. This is, of course, not a replacement for a study of the war as a whole, but a successful adjunct to that part of a general study that covers the closing period of that war. I recommend it on that basis.

    7 of 8 people found this review helpful
  • Nemesis: The Battle for Japan, 1944-45

    • UNABRIDGED (29 hrs and 17 mins)
    • By Max Hastings
    • Narrated By Stewart Cameron
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (8)
    Performance
    (8)
    Story
    (8)

    With an introduction read by Max Hastings. A companion volume to his best-selling ‘Armageddon’, Max Hastings’ account of the battle for Japan is a masterful military history. Featuring the most remarkable cast of commanders the world has ever seen, the dramatic battle for Japan of 1944-45 was acted out across the vast stage of Asia: Imphal and Kohima, Leyte Gulf and Iwo Jima, Okinawa and the Soviet assault on Manchuria.

    GEORGE says: "Great Book; Very Poor Presentation!!"
    "Almost great."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    As with Inferno, Max Hastings has written a different kind of history of World War II, this one of the war in the Pacific theater. Like Inferno, this history provides an overview of the strategy and battles with details gleaned from personal letters, diary entries and recollections of those involved. All sides are represented with many such entries involving the Japanese, Chinese and Burmese as well as the western allies, and subjects not generally covered in histories of World War II are covered in some detail. Thus, in this book, we find details on what life was like for allied soldiers held as POWs by the Japanese, for western civilians held in internment camps, for the few Japanese held as POWs by the allies, random acts of compassion and violence committed by both sides, the thoughts of those involved in the fighting on places like Iwo Jima, Okinawa and other islands, the only detailed discussion of the Russian invasion of Manchuria right before the surrender of Japan that I have found in books like these, an extraordinary chapter on the decision to drop the atomic bomb as well as almost unknown incidents like those involving the Australian soldiers who mutinied and refused to be sent out on patrols and the Australian civilians who refused to load and unload war supplies on holidays and weekends during the last 2 years of the war when Australia was no longer under the threat of Japanese invasion.

    The writing is engrossing and hard to put down, the stories of individuals both fascinating and horrifying and the truth of what life was like for those caught up in the war both clear and enlightening. While most histories of World War II have centered on the war in Europe this book makes clear that the war in the Pacific was just as difficult and painful for those involved, on both sides, as the one in Europe and Mr Hastings clearly shows how public opinion slowly turned from anger against the Japanese for their undeclared attack against Pearl Harbor into revulsion as stories of the treatment of allied POWs came out. Interestingly enough he also tells of the efforts by the allied governments to suppress the stories of Japanese brutality regarding the allied POWs.

    As wonderful as this book is I only gave it 4 stars because Mr Hastings sometimes seems to let his personal opinions overwhelm the narrative. There are parts of the book where those opinions prevent him from presenting different, but valid, views on the subject. While there are many such examples I will mention only one.

    Mr Hastings does not Douglas McArthur and that dislike seems lot color all of his writings concerning the general. Almost nothing McArthur did or planned (excepting his stewardship of Japan after the war) seems acceptable to Mr Hastings. He judges McArthur’s invasion of the Philippines as unnecessary for the defeat of Japan and spends considerable time saying so. Even if one accepts his premise that the invasion was militarily unnecessary Mr Hastings does not even consider that there might be other valid reasons for the invasion. The Philippines was a US dependency and the people were largely supportive of the US governance and the planned granting of independence. Almost alone among the peoples of Japanese occupied Asia the Philippine people looked forward to a US invasion and would probably have considered the US bypassing them as a slap on the face. In addition there was the cause of the American and Philippine POWs held by the Japanese and the attempt to save their lives. As Mr Hastings makes very clear, Japanese surrender did not mean the safety of US POWs and many were killed by their captors after Japan surrendered. In addition Mr Hastings blames the terrible loss of life of the Philippine civilians, killed by the Japanese during the invasion, as being as much due to the invasion as to the Japanese - an assumption I found both unreasonable and prejudicial.

    Mr’s Cameron’s narration is very good and helps keep the narrative foremost in view. However he has the very annoying habit of mispronouncing the word “corpsman”. In American English this is pronounced KOR-MAN but Mr Cameron constantly pronounces it KORS-MAN. It is extraordinarily annoying and ruined parts of the narration for me. I have to assume that he does not know the proper pronunciation since the word is American and refers to the medical enlisted men in the US Marines. Regardless, it is annoying.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Resurrection

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 37 mins)
    • By Arwen Elys Dayton
    • Narrated By Kate Rudd
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (163)
    Performance
    (152)
    Story
    (149)

    Five thousand years ago, the Kinley built a ship capable of traveling faster than light. It carried a group of scientists to a small, distant planet - a primitive place called Earth. Its mission was peaceful observation. But when the ship was destroyed, the Kinley crew found themselves stranded in ancient Egypt, participants in the pageant of life in the time of the Pharaohs. They buried remnants of their technology deep beneath the desert and sent a last desperate message home…. Five thousand years later, the Kinley homeworld hovers on the brink of extinction.

    Cody says: "Fast Paced Adventure in an Expertly Crafted World"
    "A bit of a disappointment"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I found this to be a difficult book to read and to review.The plot sounds like the book should be first class - the crew of the first faster-than-light starship gets stranded on a distant planet (Earth), a war almost destroys the mother planet and much of their science is lost, a new war threatens the destruction of the entire race and, after 5000 years, they attempt to find the original ship and it’s science. We have almost everything here - interplanetary war, a chase (including the attacking aliens) to find a lost technology, time-travel (sort of), love, hate, revenge, salvation, attempted genocide and more. So why was I so disappointed?

    First, it was hard for me to credit the characters. Surely one would expect a race testing their first and only faster-than-light ship to do some kind of basic psychological testing on the crew before sending them 8 light years on their maiden voyage, so how do we end up with one psychopathic killer and two people claiming to the primitive locals that they are gods? What ever happened to the Prime Directive?

    Second, why would a race utterly dependent upon the re-discovery of a lost technology for their continued existence only send one ship with only two crew members to find it? Surely they would make more than just one attempt to save their entire race.

    Third, surely someone living in domed cities to escape the radiation poison would know that such places would be kept at a higher pressure inside to insure that any cracks would result in air leaking out, not leaking in.

    In any case I almost put this book down about a quarter of the way through. I had lost patience with the actions of the stranded crew since they did not seem reasonable given psychological testing that goes on when such crews are selected, I could not conceive of only one rescue ship being sent, given how grave the situation was, and I found the narration to be ill suited to the story. In the end I decided to try to finish the book and, much to my surprise, I found the plot more interesting in the second half of the book. I finally became used to the narration and found it less objectionable toward the end of the book, perhaps because the story became more interesting and more believable.

    There were some positives about this book. The world the author created was both complex and credible, some of the crew members seemed more real because they were less idealistic and selfless than often presented in these kinds of books, the switching back and forth between the ancient and modern worlds proved to be an interesting device and the interaction between the humans and the aliens was particularly interesting to me. While I had planned to give this book, and the narration, 3 stars, in the end I decided that the second half of the book salvaged the first half for me and I ended up giving it 4 stars.

    For me, tough going, but I found some rewards for the effort to get through the book. However I did not go looking for other books by this author.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Trinity Game

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 28 mins)
    • By Sean Chercover
    • Narrated By Luke Daniels
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (179)
    Performance
    (158)
    Story
    (153)

    Daniel Byrne is an investigator for the Vatican’s secretive Office of the Devil’s Advocate - the department that scrutinizes miracle claims. Over 10 years and 721 cases, not one miracle he tested has proved true. But case #722 is different; Daniel’s estranged uncle, a crooked TV evangelist, has started speaking in tongues - and accurately predicting the future. Daniel knows Reverend Tim Trinity is a con man. Could Trinity also be something more? The evangelist himself is baffled by his newfound power.

    J. Webb says: "Faith without Acts...Could Get You Killed."
    "Not what I expected"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I found this to be an interesting story and not at all what I expected.

    Sean Chercover has created an interesting set of characters. Daniel Byrne is a Catholic priest who is having issues with his vows. His uncle is a known religious con man who is now speaking in "tongues" and Daniel's old (pre-priesthood) girlfriend becomes involved in the investigation into the truth or falseness of his uncle's predictions. The story is interesting, the characters are well drawn and have real depth, the situation is, to the best of my knowledge, unique in this type of book and the pressures on Daniel Byrne, from his superiors at the Vatican to those exerted by his ex-girlfriend, give this story a very different kind of feel. And, to add to all of that, this has the feeling of a new series and I expect to see Daniel Byrne again in an upcoming story.

    The narration is very good, the story takes several very different turns and, although part of the resolution seems predictable, much is not. There are some drawbacks. I have never known situations where priests are granted as much leeway and forgiveness as Daniel is, given his predilections for disobeying orders, but they seem like small concerns given the overall feel and direction of the story line. Recommended, with those reservations, for those interested in finding a new suspense plot.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Tricky Business

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 12 mins)
    • By Dave Barry
    • Narrated By Dick Hill
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (80)
    Performance
    (46)
    Story
    (45)

    The Extravaganza of the Seas is a 5,000 ton cash cow, a top-heavy tub whose sole function is to carry gamblers three miles from the Florida coast, take their money, then bring them back so they can find more money.

    William says: "A Lot of Fun"
    "A warning"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I was familiar with the columnist Dave Barry who wrote the short and funny articles I would see online and in the newspapers and expected something similar when I bought this book. I listened to the sample and heard the warning that there were “bad words” in the book because the book involved some unsavory characters and “that is the way they talk”, but was still unprepared for what I found. Yes, the book contains characters using hard language, but it also involves violence, murder and graphic human dismemberment and I personally had to skip past some sections because I did not want to listen to graphic details of extreme violence. I would warn people that this is not, in my opinion, a book for young listeners.

    Having said that, most of this book is typical Dave Barry. The story involves people at the “Old Folks Home”, members of an unsuccessful band, cocktail waitresses, the Coast Guard, drug smugglers and others who all get caught up in mayhem trying to make legal as well as illegal livings. It is Dave Barry funny with an interesting set of characters, an interesting story and enough laughs to satisfy pretty much any reader. The narration is nearly perfect and the combination provided me with a reasonably pleasant, if sometimes very uncomfortable, listening. An interesting story, a lot of smiles, chuckles and laughs, very good narration and some strong violence so, for me, a mixed bag.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Dog on It: A Chet and Bernie Mystery

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 40 mins)
    • By Spencer Quinn
    • Narrated By Jim Frangione
    Overall
    (1155)
    Performance
    (682)
    Story
    (681)

    In this, their first adventure, Chet and Bernie investigate the disappearance of Madison, a teenage girl who may or may not have been kidnapped, but who has definitely gotten mixed up with some very unsavory characters.

    Maggie says: "Great entertainment!"
    "Cute and OK."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I bought this book because the premise sounded interesting and because I had listened to, and thoroughly enjoyed, Suspect. That book so thoroughly captivated me that I thought I should give this book, also centered around a dog, a try. But, since that book was so good, I should have expected a bit of a disappointment.

    Dog on It is told completely from the perspective of Chet, the dog, and thus offers a bit of a change of view. The writing is decent, the plot is simple, but relatively interesting and viewing the events through the eyes and mind of the dog is cute, at least for the first book. I am not sure the device will remain fresh and interesting through all of the volumes of the series. Chet himself is an interesting character although Bernie and the other humans seemed to lack any real depth as people. The narration is acceptable although there are some unexpected and needless pauses and at times the flow suffers because of those pauses.

    The concept of telling the story through the eyes and mind of the dog is cute and the book itself is OK. I am not sure I will listen to the next book in the series because the human characters lack any real interest. That may change as Bernie has met a love interest and their future relationship may add that missing depth to the humans in the book, but at this point the best I can say is that it is cute and OK.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Caesar and Christ: The Story of Civilization, Volume 3

    • UNABRIDGED (36 hrs and 31 mins)
    • By Will Durant
    • Narrated By Grover Gardner
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (37)
    Performance
    (32)
    Story
    (32)

    The third volume of Will Durant's Pulitzer Prize-winning series, Caesar and Christ chronicles the history of Roman civilization and of Christianity from their beginnings to A.D. 325.

    Mike From Mesa says: "Superb."
    "Superb."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Will (and Ariel) Durant’s 11 volume History of Civilization is an attempt to understand our current political, economic and social system in light of what came before and the progression of events that led us to where we are today. This is volume 3 of that set.

    Mr Durant’s writing is bright, sprightly and full of the irony of human existence. This book covers the entire history of Rome from its founding through its fall as well as the birth and early years of Christianity. It includes a synopsis of the New Testament by summarizing the life of Jesus and the actions of the Apostles after his crucifixion and goes a good way to explain the rise and triumph of Christianity over the Pagan religions and of Rome itself. The book also includes a chapter covering the reasons for the fall of Rome to those it considered to be barbarians and the list of reasons given cannot help but give pause to anyone surveying our current politics.

    The book is quite old (copyrighted 1942) and thus does not contain some information which has been found since the writing of the book, but it is still a wonderful description of the period, the people, their philosophies, religions, arts, writers, politics and history. The book is comprehensive enough to cover all relevant events during the 1000 plus years but sometimes veers off onto subjects that the reader may find to be of less interest. While I personally could have skipped some of the sections covering individual Stoic and Epicurean philosophers as well as the section of Roman music, the book is so varied and covers so much that readers will almost certainly find whatever information they may be looking for in it regardless of whether or not that particular information is normally included in other histories of Rome.

    The book covers a broad range of subjects concerning ancient Rome although none are covered in extraordinary depth and the reader may want to pick up separate books covering specific areas of interest to find out more about them. As examples the Punic Wars and the Roman Civil War are covered briefly enough to understand their significance to Rome but the reader may want more information about them than is provided here.

    One drawback of the Audible version of this book is that it does not include downloads of the maps and photos that are in the print version and thus the listener will be missing the ability to actually see some of the items of art that are being described. That is not a problem particular to this book but is a general problem with spoken books and I found myself taking out the print version (I have the entire set of The History of Civilization in print format) and inspecting the photos of the statues and pottery that Mr Durant describes in the book and the ability to do that was a big help.

    The book is narrated by Grover Gardner and it is hard to see how a better narrator could have been selected. Mr Gardner’s voice is perfectly suited to this kind of book and it was a pleasure to listen to him. With the exception of what seemed to me to be a couple of misspoken dates during the narration Mr Gardner did a flawless job and adds immensely to the enjoyment of the book. I will be keeping my eyes open for any remaining volumes of the 11 volume history should they become available on Audible and now expect to pick up the next volume (The Age of Faith) in its Audible version.

    A superb book by a superb narrator for anyone interested in the rise and fall of Rome and the rise of Christianity.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • Sherlock Holmes in America

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 14 mins)
    • By Jon L. Lellenberg (editor), Martin H. Greenberg (editor), Daniel Stashower (editor)
    • Narrated By Graeme Malcolm
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (218)
    Performance
    (190)
    Story
    (188)

    Just in time for Sherlock Holmes, the major motion picture starring Robert Downey, Jr. and Jude Law: the world’s greatest fictional detective and his famous sidekick Dr. Watson are on their first trip across the Atlantic as they solve crimes all over 19th-century America - from the bustling neighborhoods of New York, Boston, and D.C. to fog-shrouded San Francisco. The world’s best-loved British sleuth faces some of the most cunning criminals America has to offer and meets America’s most famous figures.

    Amy says: "Terrific for Sherlockians!"
    "A lot of fun."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    An interesting pastiche of stories of Sherlock Holmes in the US. As a life long fan of the Sherlock Holmes stories I found these additions to be well worth reading. In fact I found many of them to be more interesting than some of those in the "Canon" and have no complaints about any of them that are actually Sherlock Holmes stories.

    However two of the "stories" are, in fact, not Sherlock Holmes stories at all but are short articles written about Arthur Conan Doyle. One is a study of what the author says is the anti-Hibernian flavor of the stories. While he may (or may not) be right, it is certainly not a Sherlock Holmes story and I found the psychological analysis of Mr Doyle both annoying and a bit silly. A second is a description of Mr Doyle's tour through the US. It is hard for me to think of either of those as being Sherlock Holmes stories.

    Still, those that are actual Sherlock Holmes stories are a lot of fun and, I think, worth the price if you like the Sherlock Holmes character.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • A Man Called Intrepid: The Incredible WWII Narrative of the Hero Whose Spy Network and Secret Diplomacy Changed the Course of History

    • UNABRIDGED (21 hrs and 27 mins)
    • By William Stevenson
    • Narrated By David McAlister
    Overall
    (18)
    Performance
    (17)
    Story
    (17)

    A Man Called Intrepid is the account of the world’s first integrated intelligence operation and of its master, William Stephenson. Codenamed INTREPID by Winston Churchill, Stephenson was charged with establishing and running a vast, worldwide intelligence network to challenge the terrifying force of Nazi Germany. Nothing less than the fate of Britain and the free world hung in the balance as INTREPID covertly set about stalling the Nazis by any means necessary.

    Mike From Mesa says: "You have to wonder ..."
    "You have to wonder ..."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    William Stevenson, or little Bill as he is referred to in this book (to compare him with big Bill, William Donovan) ran the British spy network in the US during World War II. This book is the unmasking of much that happened during that time and there are some fascinating stories included within its covers.

    Mr Stevenson is one of those relatively unknown heroes who made the winning of the war by those other heroes, the US, British, Canadian, Austrialian, French, Russian and other soldiers and sailors doing the fighting, those living through the daily bombing in the UK, those whose loved ones were risking life and limb on battlefields and those in occupied territory who had to live under the Nazi tyranny, possible. I have no doubt that we are all indebted to him and all of spies those like him who help win the war.

    The problem is that one has to wonder if some of the information included in the book is accurate. This book was published in 1976 so it is not new, but some of the information included is at variance with histories of this period that are being written now. It is reasonable to think that the events described in this book, if accurate, would be cited in the new books and used to revise what is currently being written. For example ...

    The most inflammatory event described is the Nazi bombing of Coventry. My Stevenson says that Winston Churchill knew the destination of the bombing raid and did nothing to warn those living in Coventry in order to protect the Ultra secret. I remember when, back in 1976, I first heard of this and I certainly believed it. It is one of those stories that seems to perfectly capture the terrible choices that people in power have to make. The only problem is that today historians are still saying that there is no evidence that this is true and, in fact, many of those involved in war planning have said very openly that it is not true and point to both historic actions and events to prove that the story is not true. Very few historians credit the story.

    Another example concerns the Dieppe raid which Mr Stevenson says was not planned and executed for the purpose stated but was rather for another purpose all together and served as a distraction for that true purpose. Perhaps that is true, but no other historian writing about this event today that I have read credits that story either.

    Included are descriptions of other events which have the feel of truth and are backed up by current histories of the period - the escape of the physicist Niels Bohr, the attack on the plant that supplied Germany with heavy water for their atomic experiments and the British involvement with undermining and exposing political opponents of Roosevelt's actions prior to the US entry into the war. So the book seems to me to be a mixed bag. One truly annoying omission in the book comes from the statement that the Ultra secret was guarded so closely that only 20 Allied military officers knew it. I hoped, in vain, that those people would have been identified. And interestingly enough while Mr Stevenson describes the breaking of the Japanese diplomatic code by William Friedman, he makes no mention of the breaking of the Japanese Naval codes by Commander Rochefort.

    The narration was a disappointment for me. Mr McAlister's reading is hesitant and thus hard to follow at some points in the book. His pronunciation of some people's names seemed odd and at variance with common usage today. It is a history and is perhaps a bit dry as read and I can only wonder what it might have been like had it been read by someone like Grover Gardner.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • HITLER: 1936-1945 Nemesis

    • UNABRIDGED (38 hrs and 26 mins)
    • By Ian Kershaw
    • Narrated By Graeme Malcolm
    Overall
    (29)
    Performance
    (27)
    Story
    (26)

    As Nemesis opens, Adolf Hitler has achieved absolute power within Germany and triumphed in his first challenge to the European powers. Idolized by large segments of the population and firmly supported by the Nazi regime, Hitler is poised to subjugate Europe. Nine years later, his vaunted war machine destroyed, Allied forces sweeping across Germany, Hitler will end his life with a pistol shot to his head.

    Mike From Mesa says: "Well worn ground"
    "Well worn ground"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is the second volume in Mr Kershaw's excellent biography of Adolph Hitler. The first volume covered his life up until 1936 and contained much information that I had not seen anywhere else. The second volume covers 1936-1945 and this period has been exhaustively covered by historians since it involves the lead up to, and the period of, World War II in Europe. There was little new, at least for me, in this volume since so much had been written about the time period and thus this book, although excellent, provides little insight that has not been provided in many other books. That is not to say that there is no new information here. For example there is a section of why Hitler declared war on the US after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor even though he had no treaty obligation to do so and I had not seen that explained anywhere else. Similarly there are other facts and insights scattered throughout the book that were new to me.

    Even if you have read about World War 2 the book is worth getting and reading, and especially so if the reader is not familiar with the events during that period. But readers should not expect a wealth of new information not available elsewhere. Still this volume serves as an excellent close to the first volume and is worth buying and reading, especially if the reader has finished the first volume of the biography. As you might expect in a biography the book covers Hitler and his life more than the details of the war even though the war consumed almost all of Hitler's life after the invasion of Russia. Since this is not a military history the battles are covered only in the detail needed to understand the background of Hitler's actions at that time.

    The narration is excellent as is the writing and this book is an excellent source of information about Hitler and the period covered. Recommended for those interested in this period of time.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs)
    • By Jonas Jonasson
    • Narrated By Steven Crossley
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1223)
    Performance
    (1081)
    Story
    (1098)

    After a long and eventful life, Allan Karlsson ends up in a nursing home, believing it to be his last stop. The only problem is that he's still in good health, and in one day, he turns 100. A big celebration is in the works, but Allan really isn't interested (and he'd like a bit more control over his vodka consumption). So he decides to escape. He climbs out the window in his slippers and embarks on a hilarious and entirely unexpected journey, involving, among other surprises, a suitcase stuffed with cash.

    Sylvia says: "Full of Surprises and Unexpected Events"
    "What a hoot!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I was looking for something lighter as a counter-point to some of the books I had just finished and stumbled upon this delightful story. I was uncertain about it but thought that I did not have much to lose since it was a Daily Deal and seemed like just the thing to lighten my mood.

    To my utter surprise it was a delightful choice. Allan Karlsson is a quirky guy who is just not ready to be finished with life at 100 and misses his vodka. His adventure involving thieves, police, friends and the high and mighty is something not to be missed. I found myself laughing, chuckling and smiling throughout the entire book and especially during the windup as the protagonists are telling their tale to the Prosecuting Attorney.

    This was the most delightful book I have read since A Dirty Job and Gods Behaving Badly and I recommend it highly to those with a taste for the light and quirky. The narration is excellent, the story is delightful and the experience is well worth the time spent in listening.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

CANCEL

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.