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Pierre Gauthier

Montréal | Listener Since 2010

46
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 29 reviews
  • 38 ratings
  • 109 titles in library
  • 0 purchased in 2014
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FOLLOWERS
3

  • The Jungle Book

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 8 mins)
    • By Rudyard Kipling
    • Narrated By Ralph Cosham
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (52)
    Performance
    (45)
    Story
    (44)

    Tales of Mowgli, the boy raised by animals in the exotic jungles of India; Rikkitikkitavi, a courageous young mongoose who battles the sinister black cobra Nag; Toomai, the boy who works with elephants; and more will delight listeners both young and old. These classic stories brim with adventure and thrills as the lively characters fend off ferocious tigers and deadly snakes, slip through the jungle to watch elephants dance, and seek refuge from dangerous hunters.

    Julia says: "Contents"
    "Disappointing!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    Potential buyers should be aware that the ‘Jungle Book’ is not a novel but a collection of short stories.
    These are not in chronological order nor indeed necessarily connected to one another. Some are not even set in the jungle but rather in Alaska or on Baffin Island!

    The resulting hodgepodge is plainly not very interesting, certainly much less than the many children’s books that have been derived from it or than the famous Disney animated movie!

    1 of 14 people found this review helpful
  • Metamorphosis

    • UNABRIDGED (2 hrs and 13 mins)
    • By Franz Kafka
    • Narrated By Martin Jarvis
    Overall
    (128)
    Performance
    (26)
    Story
    (28)

    Gregor Samsa wakes up one morning to find he has been transformed into a gigantic insect. This extraordinary tale of imagination was written by Kafka against the backdrop of increasing turmoil in central Europe and remains not just an affecting tale but a disturbing allegory.

    Pierre Gauthier says: "Haunting!"
    "Haunting!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    Physiologically, no insect could ever be as large as a human being.

    Thus, this short story’s premise of a young man waking up one morning as a huge insect is completely absurd.

    Yet, the story is masterfully written in such a matter-of-fact style that the listener grants it almost undoubted plausibility.

    The resulting nightmarish quality provides a lasting memory that brings one to ponder on social stigma and integration.

    It is definitely a very worthwhile purchase.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Don Quixote: Translated by Edith Grossman

    • UNABRIDGED (39 hrs and 37 mins)
    • By Miguel de Cervantes, Edith Grossman (translator)
    • Narrated By George Guidall
    Overall
    (167)
    Performance
    (158)
    Story
    (155)

    Sixteenth-century Spanish gentleman Don Quixote, fed by his own delusional fantasies, takes to the road in search of chivalrous adventures. But his quest leads to more trouble than triumph. At once humorous, romantic, and sad, Don Quixote is a literary landmark. This fresh edition, by award-winning translator Edith Grossman, brings the tale to life as never before.

    James says: "My Fourth Try at an Audible Quixote"
    "Surprisingly Fun!"
    Overall
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    Any additional comments?


     
    Potential listeners should not be discouraged by the considerable length of the work.  It turns out to be far more exciting that one could expect.  The key is that the novel should not be considered at face value but as a parody of chivalric romances that apparently abounded in Cervantes' days.  Thus, the reader discovers that a major theme of the work is the contrast, or rather the unfathomable gap, between literature and reality.

    The work actually includes two separate books. The second written some time after the first was published includes many ironic comments on the latter.  There are many funny moments throughout, as when Don Quixote meets for the first time another character claiming to be a knight errant ... who has defeated the famous Don Quixote.  The description of the actual Dulcinea Del Toboso is also memorable.

    It must be underscored that the excellent translation is very lively and includes a variety of styles and forms, apparently as in the original.

    This work is consequently very highly recommended.

    5 of 6 people found this review helpful
  • The Modern Scholar: Classic Foundations: Purpose and Tradition in Architecture

    • ORIGINAL (5 hrs and 9 mins)
    • By Professor Carroll William Westfall
    Overall
    (4)
    Performance
    (4)
    Story
    (3)

    In this engaging series of lectures, Carroll William Westfall, the University of Notre Dame's Frank Montana Professor of Architecture, delves into the classical principles of Western architecture. Exploring features such as ornamentation, decoration, and innovation, Professor Westfall shows how architecture is derived from the very principles that form the cornerstones of our civilization - and, with scholarly precision, he also demonstrates how this field of endeavor is rooted in nature itself.

    Pierre Gauthier says: "Truly fascinating!"
    "Truly fascinating!"
    Overall
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    Any additional comments?



    In this short series of lectures, Professor Westfall brilliantly underscores the value of tradition in the fields of architecture and city building.  His points of view have clearly been polished by years of consideration and he integrates a variety of fields in his discussions: philosophy, history, political science, etc.

    He succeeds in speaking of architecture without any illustrations.  Thus, though he largely shares the same positions, he comes out as the complement of Léon Krier who often expresses himself with drawings and very little text.

    It must be pointed out that Professor Westfall, though critical of modernism,  is not at all closed to modernity.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • The Modern Scholar: Seven Wonders of the Ancient World

    • ORIGINAL (7 hrs and 41 mins)
    • By Jennifer Tobin
    Overall
    (39)
    Performance
    (25)
    Story
    (24)

    Esteemed professor Jennifer Tobin leads a compelling series of lectures on the Seven Wonders of the ancient world. Examining the historical and social context of each wonder, Tobin answers such questions as "Why was it built?" and "What can it tell us about the people who built it?" From the Great Pyramid at Giza to the Colossus of Rhodes and the Pharos of Alexandria, the course provides a 360-degree view of these enduring marvels of human achievement.

    Paul says: "More than the monuments"
    "Disappointing!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    This work describes in some detail each of the seven canonical Wonders of the Ancient World and provides an overview of their specific histories. As these were only retained in the 16th century, the discussion also includes other constructions that were part of alternate lists at some point in time.

    Sadly, although she speaks with no foreign accent, Ms. Tobin clearly does not master the English language. She is constantly hesitant and often has great difficulty formulating clear ideas. Thus, the work is plagued with dozens of expressions such as:
    • “both of these two groups”;
    • “the building does not survive”;
    • “the several thousands of years between 2500 BC and 500 BC”;
    • “horn does not survive well in archeological records”;
    • “seeing the world through the lens of your own eyes”;
    • “imaginative building”.

    The result is often irritating and does not meet the standards of what would legitimately be expected for a university level presentation.

    Accordingly, it is difficult to recommend this work to anyone. Even a beginner is entitled to clear, understandable information!

    2 of 16 people found this review helpful
  • The Modern Scholar: Classical Mythology: The Romans

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 55 mins)
    • By Peter Meineck
    Overall
    (41)
    Performance
    (24)
    Story
    (24)

    Rome grew from a tiny community of small hill villages near the River Tiber in central Italy to one of the most powerful empires the world has seen. The Romans themselves believed that their great city was founded in the middle of the eighth century BCE. By the middle of the second century CE, Rome had a population of 1.5 million; Alexandria, in Egypt, 500,000; and Londinium, in Briton, 30,000.

    Pierre Gauthier says: "Very Worthwhile!"
    "Very Worthwhile!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    This fascinating series of lectures deals not with the Roman gods and goddesses per se but rather with the myths that pertain to the past of the great city: Remus and Romulus, the rape of the Sabine women, the Seven Kings of Rome, Aeneus, etc. It is well organized and based not only on the classic texts that have survived but also on archeological findings, much work in that field in fact being currently underway. In fact, it is striking how much is yet to be discovered in order to fully understand the myths that have been transmitted down to our times.Like other ‘Modern Scholar’ audio productions, some lectures are completed with answers to questions posed by students in actual classroom sessions. Also, references to a web site are provided for those who wish to go further in their learning ... or to test it with a ‘final exam’.This lecture series is a great complement to 'Greek Mythology' by the same lecturer and is strongly recommended to all interested in the topic.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle

    • UNABRIDGED (47 mins)
    • By Arthur Conan Doyle
    • Narrated By Alan Cumming
    Overall
    (5508)
    Performance
    (4729)
    Story
    (4739)

    The season of gift-giving is here, and this year we've got something special for our members: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Yuletide whodunit "The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle". In this holiday-themed short story, Sherlock Holmes and his trusty sidekick, Dr. Watson, follow the trail of a lost hat and a Christmas goose through the streets of London and into a rapidly expanding mystery.

    Katheryne says: "Superb! Love Alan Cumming"
    "Very Enjoyable!"
    Overall
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    Story
    Any additional comments?

    Though the story is contorted and a bit pointless, the exceptional rendition by the narrator makes this a truly pleasurable experience.Thank you Audible for such a Christmas gift!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Boswell's London Journal

    • ABRIDGED (55 mins)
    • By James Boswell
    • Narrated By Anthony Quayle
    Overall
    (6)
    Performance
    (4)
    Story
    (4)

    In 1762 James Boswell, then 22 years old, left Edinburgh for London. The famous Journal he kept during the next nine months is an intimate account of his encounters with the high-life and the low-life in London. Frank and confessional as a personal portrait of the young Boswell, the Journal is also revealing as a vivid portrayal of life in 18th-century London.

    Pierre Gauthier says: "Very Disappointing!"
    "Very Disappointing!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    This very short abridged version of James Boswell’s ‘London Journal ‘ is enough for the listener to decide that the full work is not a worthwhile investment in time and energy.

    Apart from a superficial description of his first meetings with Samuel Johnson, these musings deal almost exclusively with the narrator’s intimate encounters with the other sex.

    Though it is perhaps somewhat revealing of the times when it was written, this self-centered account is today almost completely devoid of interest.

    To top it all, the technical quality of the recording is quite below par, as if the microphone had been deficient.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Classical Mythology: The Greeks

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 9 mins)
    • By Peter Meineck
    Overall
    (161)
    Performance
    (81)
    Story
    (77)

    Through the study of these time-honored myths, the Greek heroes and gods - including Heracles, Zeus, Achilles, Athena, Aphrodite, and others - leap from the page in all their glorious splendor. The following lectures are not only an entertaining guide to Greek mythology, but a fascinating look into the culture and time that produced these eternal tales.

    Billy Barker says: "Loved it!"
    "Great Value!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    Though it is perhaps not earth shattering, this substantial course provides an excellent introduction to Greek mythology, focusing largely on the Iliad and the Odyssey.

    It is very well organized by themes such as ‘Gender in Myths’, ‘Myths of Identity’, ‘Myths of Initiation’, etc.

    As in a real classroom, the lectures are occasionally enriched by answers to some questions from students.

    Another bonus is access to a web site where a ‘final exam’ is provided.

    This enjoyable course is strongly recommended to anyone even remotely interested in Classical mythology. Personally, I certainly look forward to listening to it a second time!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • At Home: A Short History of Private Life

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 38 mins)
    • By Bill Bryson
    • Narrated By Bill Bryson
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2544)
    Performance
    (1274)
    Story
    (1278)

    Bill Bryson and his family live in a Victorian parsonage in a part of England where nothing of any great significance has happened since the Romans decamped. Yet one day, he began to consider how very little he knew about the ordinary things of life as he found it in that comfortable home. To remedy this, he formed the idea of journeying about his house from room to room to “write a history of the world without leaving home.”

    Tina says: "Another wonderful Bryson"
    "Entertaining!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    This work is not so much a history of private life in the UK and the United States as a wide collection of anecdotes on this theme, taken broadly. These touch the 1851 London Exhibition, the construction of Blenheim Palace and the Erie Canal, the working conditions in 19th century mines, the growth of sugar consumption in Victorian Great Britain, etc., etc., etc.

    The narrative is given some framework by being organized around the rooms of the author’s British home. Thus, the kitchen provides the excuse to discuss food matters whereas the nursery leads to a discussion of children. Often, these links are truly thin as when the fuse box is considered a room to introduce the topic of electricity.

    The author does not pose to be a historian and clearly subscribes to the idea that ‘something printed is something true ‘, no matter how implausible. He does not search for alternate sources that may provide nuance ... or contradiction.

    The overall result is a hodgepodge of tidbits that is certainly amusing but not truly worthy of an investment in time and energy.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful

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