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Cheimon

New York, NY USA | Member Since 2007

70
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 31 reviews
  • 159 ratings
  • 460 titles in library
  • 35 purchased in 2015
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FOLLOWERS
5

  • All the King's Men

    • UNABRIDGED (20 hrs and 57 mins)
    • By Robert Penn Warren
    • Narrated By Michael Emerson
    Overall
    (812)
    Performance
    (430)
    Story
    (428)

    The fictionalized account of Louisiana's colorful and notorious governor, Huey Pierce Long, All the King's Men follows the startling rise and fall of Willie Stark, a country lawyer in the Deep South of the 1930s. Beset by political enemies, Stark seeks aid from his right-hand man Jack Burden, who will bear witness to the cataclysmic unfolding of this very American tragedy.

    Eric Berger says: "Marvelously written and read"
    "Beautifully presented"
    Overall

    This is a wonderfully moving, insightful presentation of the novel, treating the characters with tenderness as they are being torn apart. That said - this is not an audiobook for the casual listener, the novel demands attention. If you are like me, and listen to audiobooks while walking on busy streets, relying on an author to dwell on important plot points long enough for you to hear them eventually (think Tolstoy), you will find yourself rewinding All The King's Men a lot.

    8 of 8 people found this review helpful
  • The New Yorker, April 6th 2015 (Evan Osnos, Stephen Rodrick, Steve Coll)

    • HIGHLIGHTS (2 hrs and 7 mins)
    • By Evan Osnos, Stephen Rodrick, Steve Coll
    • Narrated By Dan Bernard, Christine Marshall
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (1)

    In this issue: "A Calculated Risk", by Steve Coll; "Fibreglass Menagerie", by Ian Parker; "Born Red", by Evan Osnos; "The Nerd Hunter", by Stephen Rodrick; and "Dear Diary, I Hate You", by Alice Gregory.

    Cheimon says: "BRING BACK THE MOVIE REVIEWS!!!!!"
    "BRING BACK THE MOVIE REVIEWS!!!!!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    They are essential listening!! And only ten minutes! You can fit them in! Please bring them back!!!!

    Also, please bring back the overview in the beginning - it gives a better sense of what the stories are about and it's helpful to have a sense if I'll be interested in the whole issue or just a part of it from the outset.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Lone Survivor: The Eyewitness Account of Operation Redwing and the Lost Heroes of SEAL Team 10

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By Marcus Luttrell, Patrick Robinson
    • Narrated By Kevin Collins
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3679)
    Performance
    (3335)
    Story
    (3342)

    Four US Navy SEALS departed one clear night in early July, 2005 for the mountainous Afghanistan-Pakistan border for a reconnaissance mission. Their task was to document the activity of an al Qaeda leader rumored to have a small army in a Taliban stronghold. Five days later, only one of those Navy SEALS made it out alive. This is the story of the only survivor of Operation Redwing, SEAL team leader Marcus Luttrell, and the extraordinary firefight that led to the largest loss of life in American Navy SEAL history.

    Mike says: "Enthralling and authentic story of valor in combat"
    "A must-listen despite fake-accented narrator"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Bad narration is a small price to pay for an unbelievable, profoundly inspiring story that will probably stay with you long, long after the narrator's voice has faded.

    But seriously, Hachette, are there no Texan narrators? Or Southerners who sound at least vaguely Texan? Or really any narrator who can do a Texan accent that will not sound like he's constantly making fun of his war hero subject? Apparently Mr. Collins is from New Jersey. If there's ever a second audio edition, I nominate MacLeod Andrews.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Grandissimo: The First Emperor of Las Vegas: How Jay Sarno Won a Casino Empire, Lost It, and Inspired Modern Las Vegas

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 27 mins)
    • By David G. Schwartz
    • Narrated By Eric Martin
    Overall
    (115)
    Performance
    (99)
    Story
    (101)

    Sarno's casinos - and his ideas about how to build casinos - created the template for Las Vegas today. Before him, Las Vegas meant dealers in string ties and bland, functional architecture. He taught the city how to dress up its hotels in fantasy, putting toga dresses on cocktail waitresses and making sure that even the stationery carried through with the theme. He saw Las Vegas as a place where ordinary people could leave their ordinary lives and have extraordinary adventures.

    Andrew says: "Great Listen - Thanks to Dr. Dave"
    "Oddly... dull. Not a good 'Intro to Vegas'"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    To my surprise, this turned out to be a fairly boring book. Schwartz does little with all the literary fodder Las Vegas of the 60's and 70's provides and largely stays on the surface of his characters, their relationships and all the political tugs and pulls. While he certainly does a fine job recounting the life of Jay Sarno, it's all just information, and often too much of it. Where are the major themes, the connections, the grand whole that modern biographies paint so magnificently?

    This may very well be valuable reading if you are a Vegas expert already and Sarno is a missing piece of the puzzle for you. But if you, like me, know very little about the town, this is too specific and narrow a book to open it up much.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • What Everyone Needs to Know about Islam, Second Edition

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 44 mins)
    • By John L. Esposito
    • Narrated By Neil Shah
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (14)
    Performance
    (13)
    Story
    (13)

    Since the terrorist attacks of September 11th, there has been an overwhelming demand for information about Islam, and recent events - the war in Iraq, terrorist attacks both failed and successful, debates throughout Europe over Islamic dress, and many others - have raised new questions in the minds of policymakers and the general public. This newly updated edition of What Everyone Needs to Know about Islam is the best single source for clearly presented, objective information about these new developments, and for answers to questions about the origin and traditions of Islam.

    Cheimon says: "Fairly flat and superficial - expected more"
    "Fairly flat and superficial - expected more"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The book is set up as a long series of Frequently Asked Questions - sadly, the answers don't extend beyond the typical FAQ format either. It is a very basic bird's eye view of some of the history, religious tenets and practices in Islam.

    Given Professor Esposito's resume, I was hoping for a deeper and more coherent religious and sociological perspective. Instead, he remains at the very surface of belief and history.

    In addition, he weaves in a steady undercurrent of perhaps necessary, but just very tired-sounding affirmations of the peacefulness of Islam and of the overwhelming majority of those who practice it. That's all well and good, and probably can't be said often enough (even within a single book), but that can't be ALL everyone needs to know about Islam? I, for one, would like to know more.


    (Perhaps this is just not meant to be an audiobook... the questions do not build on each other very much, so a lot of information is repeated in various spots. Maybe a good book to have on the shelf for the odd Islam question that might come up, not a very satisfying listen though.)

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Ulysses

    • UNABRIDGED (27 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By James Joyce
    • Narrated By Jim Norton
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (870)
    Performance
    (576)
    Story
    (565)

    Ulysses is regarded by many as the single most important novel of the 20th century. It tells the story of one day in Dublin, June 16th 1904, largely through the eyes of Stephen Dedalus (Joyce's alter ego from Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man) and Leopold Bloom, an advertising salesman. Both begin a normal day, and both set off on a journey around the streets of Dublin, which eventually brings them into contact with one another.

    A User says: "Ulysses (Unabridged)"
    "All-in, transformative performance"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Jim Norton takes this classic to a new level. It's a pleasure, likely even a welcome aid in understanding to first-time readers and an exquisite, enriching new experience to those who are well familiar with the text. Think of this audiobook as performance rather than mere narration - much like reading Hamlet will not keep you from enjoying it on stage, prior study of Ulysses does not make this audiobook any less worthwhile (quite the opposite).

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Feminine Mystique

    • UNABRIDGED (23 hrs and 14 mins)
    • By Betty Friedan
    • Narrated By Parker Posey
    Overall
    (243)
    Performance
    (194)
    Story
    (194)

    The book that changed the consciousness of a country - and the world. Landmark, groundbreaking, classic - these adjectives barely describe the earthshaking and long-lasting effects of Betty Friedan's The Feminine Mystique. This is the book that defined "the problem that has no name", that launched the Second Wave of the feminist movement, and has been awakening women and men with its insights into social relations, which still remain fresh, ever since.

    Sarah says: "This is an inspirational novel"
    "Important first-hand report from the past"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    At its most basic, The Feminine Mystique read today is a reminder of how fundamentally our society has changed in two short generations, how many perspectives, mindsets and ambitions we take for granted today that might have been deemed actually harmful or even dangerous only sixty years ago. (Of course, it is equally stunning how many of the questions Friedan poses remain open today, though that is more general knowledge.)

    Sadly, the narration is not up to par. I wish they had chosen a professional narrator instead of a celebrity. Ms. Posey's voice lacks inflection and is often too casual. A few odd direction/editing choices don't help either.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Color Purple

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 3 mins)
    • By Alice Walker
    • Narrated By Alice Walker
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1518)
    Performance
    (1074)
    Story
    (1074)

    Celie is a poor black woman whose letters tell the story of 20 years of her life, beginning at age 14 - when she is being abused and raped by her father and attempting to protect her sister from the same fate - and continuing over the course of her marriage to "Mister", a brutal man who terrorizes her.

    Lauren says: "Good Listen"
    "Narration by author - its own work of art"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    No matter how often you have read the book, watched the movie, seen the musical - your "The Color Purple" experience and appreciation cannot be complete until you have listened to Alice Walker narrate her own work. The skill with which she captures her characters and their times and the subtlety with which she conveys the changes that define them, make this performance a work of art in its own right. The novel got under my skin all over again.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue: The Untold Story of English

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 22 mins)
    • By John McWhorter
    • Narrated By John McWhorter
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1527)
    Performance
    (1211)
    Story
    (1204)

    A survey of the quirks and quandaries of the English language, focusing on our strange and wonderful grammar. Why do we say "I am reading a catalog" instead of "I read a catalog"? Why do we say "do" at all? Is the way we speak a reflection of our cultural values? Delving into these provocative topics and more, Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue distills hundreds of years of fascinating lore into one lively history.

    Cookie says: "Oh the joy!"
    "Very dry for those with mere casual interest"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    For linguists, I am sure this is well worth the five hours - for me, it was tough to get through. McWhorter digs deep into a large variety of old European languages and nuances of vocabulary and grammar that go well beyond what I was looking for.

    The narration by the author is a huge bonus though because pronunciation of so many very foreign or old words is crucial, I doubt another narrator could have performed this nearly as well. His occasional laughs at his own jokes are unnecessary, but forgivable.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 52 mins)
    • By Colin Woodard
    • Narrated By Walter Dixon
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (620)
    Performance
    (541)
    Story
    (548)

    North America was settled by people with distinct religious, political, and ethnographic characteristics, creating regional cultures that have been at odds with one another ever since. Subsequent immigrants didn't confront or assimilate into an "American" or "Canadian" culture, but rather into one of the 11 distinct regional ones that spread over the continent each staking out mutually exclusive territory. In American Nations, Colin Woodard leads us on a journey through the history of our fractured continent....

    Theo Horesh says: "One of a Kind Masterpiece"
    "Deep divisions of past shed light on present"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book goes far beyond what we generally learn about what America looked like "under the hood," especially around Independence, and provides insightful cultural explanations for so many of the inconsistencies and conflicts that plague us today.

    Woodard backs up the lines he draws among the various groups of early immigrants with so much background and so many interesting facts that I have been able to impress even astute students of American history with this book. In his persuasive view, our many modern divisions are the harvest of seeds sown long before the Constitution (about which I also learned some surprising facts). The seeds include not only religion and slavery, but fundamentally different views on freedom, wealth and democracy, and even very different experiences as colonies. The differences between New Englanders and New Yorkers, the cultural nuances among the Western states, the kinship between the Coasts, even the regional differences in unionization make infinitely more sense after listening to American Nations.

    If you have any interest in how the patchwork that is America came into being, you will devour this book.

    Walter Dixon's occasional use of regional or foreign accents are misplaced and sometimes borderline offensive, especially as none of the 17th and 18th century persons he narrates with a neutral accent would sound neutral to modern ears either. He is such an outstanding, funny, intelligent character narrator in fiction, non-fiction just seems to be a waste of his talents.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Psychopath Inside: A Neuroscientist's Personal Journey into the Dark Side of the Brain

    • UNABRIDGED (4 hrs and 58 mins)
    • By James Fallon
    • Narrated By Walter Dixon
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (60)
    Performance
    (49)
    Story
    (49)

    The memoir of a neuroscientist whose research led him to a bizarre personal discovery, James Fallon had spent an entire career studying how our brains affect our behavior when his research suddenly turned personal. While studying brain scans of several family members, he discovered that one perfectly matched a pattern he’d found in the brains of serial killers. This meant one of two things: Either his family’s scans had been mixed up with those of felons or someone in his family was a psychopath.

    Douglas says: "Like Other Readers..."
    "Powerful due to unlikable first-person perspective"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    What distinguishes this book from others is its first-person perspective - on occasion, you realize that the guy talking to you is, in fact, a psychopath. With the behavior, the narcissism and the expectations of one.

    That he can explain the workings of the brain as an expert provides a valuable theoretical backdrop. But this book stands out because we start out rooting for the author because we are embarking on a personal journey with him, until his choices leave us disappointed over and over again - just like we are dealing with a psychopath.

    If you are interested in the subject matter, do not miss this book.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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