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Judith

ratings
227
REVIEWS
103
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
41
HELPFUL VOTES
126

  • The Panther

    • UNABRIDGED (21 hrs and 28 mins)
    • By Nelson DeMille
    • Narrated By Scott Brick
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1875)
    Performance
    (1578)
    Story
    (1574)

    Anti-Terrorist Task Force agent John Corey and his wife, FBI agent Kate Mayfield, have been posted overseas to Sana'a, Yemen - one of the most dangerous places in the Middle East. While there, they will be working with a small team to track down one of the masterminds behind the USS Cole bombing: a high-ranking Al Qaeda operative known as The Panther. Ruthless and elusive, he's wanted for multiple terrorist acts and murders - and the U.S. government is determined to bring him down, no matter the cost.

    Judi says: "Disappointing and slow"
    "Corey and Brenner--it doesn't get any better!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Every one of Nelson DeMille's books are like a delicious treat to be treasured and savored. Meticulously researched, cleverly written--a master story teller to whom every single written word is meaningful. No wasted words or characters. Two of his wittiest and most clever characters, John Corey and Paul Brenner unite in this on-topic masterpiece that is too close to current events to ever be made into a movie. It is a shame, as all his books should be movies. Just as John Travolta brought wise-cracking Paul Brenner to life in the movie rendition of The General's Daughter; a movie with him and the Corey character would be great. But relish DeMille's latest masterpiece; he has the recipe that so many authors have tried for and failed: humor, well-researched and intricate plot, no gratuitous violence or sex, and not a single wasted word. All wonderful. By the way, do listen to the epilogue. It is worthwhile hearing the author's own personage as it blends with that of his characters.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • Missing You

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 46 mins)
    • By Harlan Coben
    • Narrated By January LaVoy
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (344)
    Performance
    (300)
    Story
    (306)

    Number-one New York Times best-selling author Harlan Coben set huge sales records with last year’s Six Years - and he’s poised to do it again in his next breathtaking stand-alone thriller. Harlan Coben, author of six consecutive instant number-one New York Times best sellers and a total of 24 award-winning, best-selling, and internationally acclaimed novels, returns with another ripped-from-real-life thriller full of impossibly high emotional stakes and the real-to-life characters for which he has become famous.

    Susan says: "I Ain't Missing You"
    "Coben. Kidnapping. Again."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    As has become a typical dark counterpart to Coben's vastly entertaining Myron Bolitar series, every book that I can think of since then has involved heart-wrenching kidnapping or people missing--children, adults, whoever. This is no different, only more so.

    However, he writes through a female persona this time, cop Kat. And, he does a good job. She is self-depricating and wise-cracking, and canny. Funny how he subtly evokes the Bolitar series with the Windsor Lockhorn building where Kat and her friend have a safe place to meet.

    Good listen, but SO tired of the kidnapping/missing theme. Why the obsession? There are so many other interesting mysteries and capers.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Mermaids Singing

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 11 mins)
    • By Val McDermid
    • Narrated By Graham Roberts
    Overall
    (307)
    Performance
    (260)
    Story
    (260)

    The bodies of four men have been discovered in the town of Bradfield. Enlisted to investigate is criminal psychologist Tony Hill. Even for a seasoned professional, the series of mutilation sex murders is unlike anything he's encountered before. But profiling the psychopath is not beyond him. Hill's own past has made him the perfect man to comprehend the killer's motives. It's also made him the perfect victim. A game has begun for the hunter and the hunted.

    Nancy J says: "The First of a Superior Series"
    "Little shop of tortures"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The entire book is composed of graphically detailed modern day application of medieval torture instruments. It is a story of a sicko needing the most gruesome forms of torture in history to become sexually aroused. The author seems to have become consumed by the methods of the Inquisition and other heinous forms of desiccating a human. Yes, there is the search for the "gay murderer" by a sexually confused profiler; but it is less about the "mystery", and much, much, much more about the detailed descriptions of torture. Not a great substitute for character development and a good mystery. I am unlikely to wade through this author's work again.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Tonight I Said Goodbye

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 40 mins)
    • By Michael Koryta
    • Narrated By Scott Brick
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (383)
    Performance
    (290)
    Story
    (287)

    Investigator Wayne Weston is found dead of an apparent suicide in his home in an upscale Cleveland suburb, and his wife and six-year-old daughter are missing. Weston’s father insists that private investigators Lincoln Perry and Joe Pritchard take the case to exonerate his son and find his granddaughter and daughter-in-law. As they begin to work, they discover there is much more to the situation than has been described in the prevalent media reports.

    Ed says: "Amazingly good for a debut book"
    "Move over Coben and DeMille--this guy is great!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The missing wife and child, a la Harlan Coben, the humorously wisecracking detective, a la Nelson DeMille, narrated by Scott Brick--this author has it all!

    I had never heard of Michael Koryta, but I am definitely a new fan. I longed for the return of Coben's Myron Bollitar, with his witty repartee and DeMille's fabulously articulate wisecracking protagonists, but my wait is over. This book is well-written, well crafted, humorous, has a great plot, and depth of characters. It even has a "surprise" twist at the end. What more could you want?

    It takes a lot for me to put an author in the same class as Nelson DeMille, but this guy's got it. You end up really knowing the characters, and it never gets slow. I highly, highly recommend it to anyone who wants mystery taken to the next level.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • McNally's Secret: Archy McNally, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 34 mins)
    • By Lawrence Sanders
    • Narrated By Victor Bevine
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (62)
    Performance
    (54)
    Story
    (54)

    Playful, seductive, irresistible - this best-selling masterwork of fatal passion and greed introduces Lawrence Sanders's most wickedly charming sleuth. Meet Archy McNally, a freewheeling playboy who specializes is "discreet inquires" for the rich and not-so-discreet. Beneath the glaring sun of Palm Beach - and behind the lowest crimes of high society - McNally is paid to keep family skeletons in the closet. But when it comes to sex and scandal, McNally has a few secrets of his own....

    Ted says: "Forgettable? Yeah, Like A Savory Rich Desert!"
    "Gatsby-era dialogue"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    At first, I thought the dialogue of this book was a joke, a farce--in no way serious. Then the references to everything from the 40s to the 90s gave me chronological vertigo. Put all together, it was just vertigo.

    It says the book was published in 1992. Maybe republished, but the stilted Gatsby-era dialogue and numerous references were waaay before the 90s--maybe the 40s? This author was born in 1920, and the book bears all the hallmarks of someone writing of the 1930s or 40s, with some updated "things" randomly thrown in.

    I can assure you that even an Ivy Leaguer would not speak with such a foppish vocabulary and expressions, even in the 90s. The 30s, 40s...maybe, while wearing a raccoon coat. This preposterous vocabulary had Archy referred to often as a "lad"or "buster", talk was "blather" or "drivel", he said something "diddled" him, bad guys were "villains", "nefarious types", "fiends" and "no-goodnicks", people "decried" things, women were "upholstered", men had a "Barrymore profile", and he wore a "boater" hat. There were no contractions in the diction; everything was "I am" or "you (or one) will", etc. All songs and television shows were of 50ish vintage. Frank Sinatra was king.

    Thrown in to try to "update" the chronology were a Lexus (referred to once), a cell phone (referred to once or twice), a Miata, and not much else. The songs he liked and heard were 40s songs, the computer he referred to was a 70s computer, and everyone was greeted as "old man" or "old boy", with whom he would have a "spot of lunch". His favorite expression, annoyingly, was "one never knows, do one?". Furthermore, being an Irish dandy, he liberally used Yiddish words and expressions, adding confusion to confusion.

    The sad thing was that if this were truthfully presented as a period piece, it could have been charming, if not mind-blowing. But the careless "updating", while maintaining the archaic dialogue and vocabulary made it a linguistic folly. It literally kept me reeling, not being able to place the action in time or space.

    As to the plot, if you could possibly get over the ridiculous dialogue and lack of a place in chronology, it was weak and forgettable.

    Thankfully, it didn't cost me a credit, and I won't be staggering through this author's time, space and vocabulary continuum again. This was so not written in the 90s (at least not by anyone who had been outside of his house in half a century), and I feel cheated that they would think anyone could believe it was!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Lay Down My Sword and Shield

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 45 mins)
    • By James Lee Burke
    • Narrated By Will Patton
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (482)
    Performance
    (316)
    Story
    (311)

    Against the backdrop of growing civil rights turmoil in a sultry border town, the hard-drinking ex-POW attorney Hackberry Holland yields to the myriad urgings of his wife, his brother, and his so-called friends to make a bid for a congressional seat - and finds himself embroiled in the seamy world of Texas powerbrokers.

    Cat F. says: "The Publisher's Summary is Anemic"
    "TMI!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    While a powerful comparison of politics, civil rights and life in the South to a Korean prisoner of war camp, this book becomes one long nightmare. I haven't quite finished it yet, but the prolonged, painfully detailed, and seemingly endless descriptions of the brutality in the camp--down to the constant descriptions of the defecations, starvation, and bloody, bone-crunching horrors was just too much. Most of us have been alive long enough to have heard the gruesome details of such imprisonment, but having it constantly thrown at the reader, gory detail after gory detail for so very much of the book, was not necessary to use it as the metaphor it was.

    Will Patton was great in his narration, but the vile nightmares of unimaginable cruelty totally dominated this book, and I never would have chosen it if I knew i would have to share every brutal moment of those continual nightmares.

    I imagine it is much like an abused child who goes on to become an abuser. He went through the gutters of humanity in war, only to seek out the gutters of humanity in politics--particularly southern racist politics. And his remedy seemed to be self sedation via alcohol and $3 Mexican whores". I'm hoping an enlightenment will evolve, but so far, the author seems determined to keep us in the gutter with the prisoners.

    The approach of comparing the cruelty and inhumanity of racism with the cruelty and inhumanity of war is compelling--but enough is enough. I'm on the fence about this author; and this will make me take a step back for awhile.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Gods of Guilt

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 49 mins)
    • By Michael Connelly
    • Narrated By Peter Giles
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2021)
    Performance
    (1787)
    Story
    (1779)

    Mickey Haller gets the text, "Call me ASAP - 187," and the California penal code for murder immediately gets his attention. Murder cases have the highest stakes and the biggest paydays, and they always mean Haller has to be at the top of his game. When Mickey learns that the victim was his own former client, a prostitute he thought he had rescued and put on the straight and narrow path, he knows he is on the hook for this one. He soon finds out that she was back in LA and back in the life.

    Jane says: "Definitely entertaining. I had some smiles."
    "Great courtroom coup"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Connolly does it again, with Mickey Haller pulling off impossible courtroom wins. Although it could be tedious, it isn't, and seemingly dry courtroom tales become tantalizing under Connolly's expert pen. However, while it is a bit of a peeve for me that, with many other books, the significance of the title either is too difficult to decipher, or does not reveal itself until the end. In "Gods" it is constantly, CONSTANTLY repeated over and over throughout the book. In my opinion, it's the book's one flaw. We get it! It is an elusive and elegant phrase, but terribly overused. Great read, other than that!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Second Son: A Jack Reacher Story

    • UNABRIDGED (1 hr and 27 mins)
    • By Lee Child
    • Narrated By Dick Hill
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (199)
    Performance
    (181)
    Story
    (184)

    In this new short story from #1 New York Times best-selling author Lee Child, available exclusively as an eBook, a young Jack Reacher knows how to finish a fight so it stays finished. He knows how to get the job done so it stays done. And, in one of his earliest challenges, he knows that his analytical brain is just as important as his impressive brawn.

    Henry says: "I have all 18 Jack Reacher books by Lee Child"
    "Beware! Not a new story"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I pre-ordered this because it claimed to be a new story from Lee Child. I thought any Reacher story, even a short one would be worth it. I'm not sure where I heard the entire story of his youth as a Marine brat, but I heard it before--probably as part of a full book. This is NOT a "New" story, and isn't even worth the couple of dollars it cost, because it is not new. Any Reacher fan will have heard it before. Since I don't buy books anywhere but Audible, I know I heard it here, and a while ago. Bad way to get you to pay for what you have already heard/read. Yes, it is a good story of the precocious Reacher, but been there done that. Redundant.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Prince of Fire

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 50 mins)
    • By Daniel Silva
    • Narrated By Guerin Barry
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (474)
    Performance
    (259)
    Story
    (263)

    Now Allon is back in Venice, when a terrible explosion in Rome leads to a disturbing personal revelation: the existence of a dossier in terrorist hands that strips away his secrets, lays bare his history.

    Steven says: "great book, horrible audio"
    "Good despite lack of past tenses,mispronunciations"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    It is hard to go wrong with a Silva novel. His intensity, correlation with history, and continuing story line make most listens compelling. I didn't realize that I had missed this one in the lineage of his books, and found it wanting. Not because of the story line, but because of the annoying narration.

    I have come to know the characters as familiar, as Silva does such an excellent job in fleshing them out. However, when this narrator pronounces their names entirely differently, it is unsettling. It is hard for me to grasp how such an accomplished writer as Silva could momentarily forget the correct past tenses of most verbs ("spring, sprang, sprung", etc.), so I have to believe it was the narrator who furnished the tense most comfortable, even if incorrect, to him. He also put the emphasis on wrong words in the story, completely changing the meaning of many sentences. Somehow, Gabriel wasn't Gabriel when voiced by this narrator.

    But, for everyone who loves Silva books, it is still a necessary listen, even though occasionally a grating one. Good story, bad narration and characterization.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Into the Darkest Corner

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 1 min)
    • By Elizabeth Haynes
    • Narrated By David Thorpe, Karen Cass
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (985)
    Performance
    (824)
    Story
    (828)

    Catherine has been enjoying the single life for long enough to know a good catch when she sees one. Gorgeous, charismatic, spontaneous – Lee seems almost too perfect to be true. And her friends clearly agree, as each in turn falls under his spell. But there is a darker side to Lee. His erratic, controlling and sometimes frightening behaviour means that Catherine is increasingly isolated. Driven into the darkest corner of her world, and trusting no one, she plans a meticulous escape.

    Betty says: "AN OCD IS STALKED BY A PSYCHOPATH"
    "A compelling case for OCD--Compelling listen!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I didn't expect to like this book at all, and would not have gotten it if it weren't on sale. For one thing, the subject matter of an abused OCD whom no one believes is unpleasant if not haunting. Then, when I started listening, I was sure I didn't like the female narrator, Karen Cass, who sounded like a brainless wonder with a British accent.

    In fact, I was haunted, until I finished it. It was an incredible story, perfectly narrated by Cass, who managed to show innocence, vulnerability, reason and strength somehow all the time. In spite of it being the most frightening thriller I had read in a long time, I could not stop listening. Cass's "dumb blond" voice didn't annoy; rather it became the only voice of reason in the story. And, she was stronger than I would have thought possible--stronger than I would have been under her circumstances.

    But the real heroine was the author, Elizabeth Haynes, of whom I have never heard, but will certainly look into. She didn't "tell" the story, she literally placed the reader or listener in the situation. I found myself holding my breath when Cathy did, and felt myself wanting by comparison. It truly was haunting--I have had nightmares ever since starting it--but wouldn't have stopped listening for the world. There were no unnecessarily gruesome descriptions of anything, they just happened. I have read and listened to way too many novels that depended on the drawn-out gratuitious violence in horrific and continuous detail. This was more compelling because you felt it all.

    It really makes a case for not dismissing the fears of people who seem to fear all the time. The fact that they display OCD symptoms does not make the performance of the checking and double-checking wrong or misguided. It may be that they have a reason to be fearful and simply can't depend on someone else to protect them--or believe them. The quirk has a root, and the root may have merit.

    The story's switching from the dark past (2004) to the "present" (2008) was a bit confusing and even annoying at first. But the parallels soon became evident, as did the necessity of this type of very effective presentation.

    A truly must-read, even for the feint at heart. It is a magnificent story of the triumph of the human spirit and one's ability to dispel "ghosts" literally without any help or support other than her own sense of reason and conviction.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Burglar in the Rye

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 53 mins)
    • By Lawrence Block
    • Narrated By Richard Ferrone
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (95)
    Performance
    (67)
    Story
    (65)

    Winner of multiple Edgar and Shamus Awards, Lawrence Block keeps fans guessing to the end with his rollicking Bernie Rhodenbarr mysteries. In this diverting caper, full-time bookstore owner and part-time burglar Bernie tries to do the right thing for a new friend, only to find himself accused of some terrible wrongs.

    F. Hayek says: "Outstanding"
    "Good voyage in literary references, and OK mystery"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The lovable fastidious thief just misses the mark in this book, but the richness in literary references makes it worthwhile. The book ends like an Agatha Christie mystery, with all characters gathered in the same room and our hero pointing out the guilty person. However, unlike Christie, he had an unfair advantage, and the clues were not really there or believable. The "Thief's Guide" series is much more enjoyable.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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