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Susan

Skipper

ratings
104
REVIEWS
77
FOLLOWING
3
FOLLOWERS
0
HELPFUL VOTES
34

  • Crystal Soldier: Liaden Universe Books of Before, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 56 mins)
    • By Sharon Lee, Steve Miller
    • Narrated By Kevin T. Collins
    Overall
    (166)
    Performance
    (148)
    Story
    (149)

    Centuries in the past, mankind fought a seemingly unbeatable adversary from sector to sector across the Spiral Arm until the war ground to a standstill and the Enemy withdrew. Believing that they had won, the citizens of the galaxy rebuilt. The Inner Worlds, which had escaped the worst of the war's ravages, became even more insular, while the Rim worlds adopted a free and easy way with law and order. Now, hundreds of years after their withdrawal, the Enemy is back - and this time they'll be satisfied with nothing less than the extinction of the galaxy.

    Shawn says: "A good introduction to Lianden"
    "Good book, great narration"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I love this narrator. He doesn't try to adopt a unique voice for each character, but yet he sounds real, and I can tell who is speaking. As for the book, the first third, especially when Jela meets Tree, is very good, yet slow. Likewise, the last third, from meeting Uncle until the end, is very good -- and nicely paced. The middle section got a bit tedious at times.

    This is book 1 in the Liaden series. The crystal soldier is probably M. Jela Granthor's Guard, a supersoldier and generalist, with extra strength and stamina, increased vision and memory, etc. Jela is consistently portrayed as dutiful -- to preserving all life, Tree in particular.

    Jela and baby Tree unite. Baby Tree talks to Jela in images, and creates special seed pods for Jela to eat. Jela lugs that potted plant around throughout the book. Lol.

    Then Jela meets peerless pilot Cantra yos'Phelium. Some good scenes, but they circle warily. Had to laugh at Cantra's ironic take on life in general and on Tree in particular. With sharp self-mockery, she wonders, "Why am I listening to a vegetable?"

    Dulsey and Uncle each play a role. I didn't care for either of them, but especially Dulsey. She seemed self-centered, and acted like she was entitled.

    The villains, the big bad Sheriekas, are perfect beings of unlimited power, determined to destroy everything and everyone not similarly perfect. They were far too nebulous and vague. Poorly developed.

    I liked Rool Tiazan and his Gray Lady, but they didn't show up till the last section. Cool scene, when they first met Tree.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Dragonsbane

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 15 mins)
    • By Barbara Hambly
    • Narrated By Derek Perkins
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (23)
    Performance
    (20)
    Story
    (23)

    When the Black Dragon seized the Deep of Ylferdun, young Gareth braved the far Winterlands to find John Aversin, Dragonsbane - the only living man ever to slay a dragon. In return for the promise of the King to send help to the Winterlands, Aversin agreed to attempt the nearly impossible feat again.With them, to guard them on the haunted trip south, went Jenny Waynest, a half-taught sorceress and mother of Aversin's sons.But at the decadent Court, nothing was as expected. Rebellion threatened the land.

    Susan says: "Jenny's Journey"
    "Jenny's Journey"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The "Dragonsbane" is the hero of song and story, about whom bards sing ballads. He's the great warrior who slew a dragon ten years ago.

    Gareth, a young nobleman from the king's court, is fond of dragon ballads. Idealistic -- and desperate — Gareth comes north to seek aide in killing a new dragon ravaging the king's southern territories. However, he is surprised at what he finds, for the legendary warrior — bane of the dragons — is simply John Iverson, bespectacled, bookish, plain-speaking, hard-working lord of the north, caring deeply for his people, carving a hard-won life from the winter lands, the hinterlands.

    Gareth also finds Jenny, a witch, the love of John's life, the mother of his two young sons. But not his wife.

    Although Gareth and John play key roles, as does the dragon himself (cool creature, great characterization) and the villain (a credible cretin, and so very vile), this book is primarily about Jenny's journey of discovery.

    Across the chapters, she discovers her powers ("the heart of magic is magic. A Mage does magic"). In the end, she discovers her heart.

    For some reason, her dawning realizations didn't deeply engage my own mind or tug on my heart. Maybe she thought too much, repeating herself, leaving little interpretation or guesswork for me. Maybe it's because her sons were never brought to vivid reality, so I couldn't care enough about them. I thought Jenny almost foolishly wishy-washy.

    This is a fantasy, complete with kings, wizards, gnomes, dragons, and treasure, but there's a touch of romance. Almost a lover's triangle, in some scenes.

    Great narration by Derek Perkins, except he made John sound like a country bumpkin — which he is according to the text, and by his own frank admission — but I couldn't fall in love with him because of that portrayal.

    This book brought to mind Raven's Shadow and Raven's Strike, a duology by Patricia Briggs. An emperor seeks help from a country farmer in ridding his lands of a shadow. However, I liked the Raven series more, because I grew to care more about the characters.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Goblin Emperor

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 25 mins)
    • By Katherine Addison
    • Narrated By Kyle McCarley
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (34)
    Performance
    (31)
    Story
    (31)

    The youngest, half-goblin son of the Emperor has lived his entire life in exile, distant from the Imperial Court and the deadly intrigue that suffuses it. But when his father and three sons in line for the throne are killed in an "accident," he has no choice but to take his place as the only surviving rightful heir. Entirely unschooled in the art of court politics, he has no friends, no advisors, and the sure knowledge that whoever assassinated his father and brothers could make an attempt on his life at any moment.

    Alison says: "Excellent story and great narration!"
    "Not bad, but not what I expected"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    3.5 stars for this predominantly heartwarming coming-of-age-in-politics piece, but fantastic 5-star narration by Kyle McCarley. Well-modulated British accent fit the characters nicely.

    The story itself was not what I expected. I thought this would be a politically-focused fantasy, with magic and mystery abounding. Well, there was a wee pinch of magic, occurring only once or twice in the entire story. There was a mystery, but it stayed in the background for the most part.

    This book could be any realistic narrative about day-to-day events as a young, untrained, unwanted boy (named Maia -- pronounced Maya -- age 18) takes over his suddenly dead father's throne as emperor of the elves. The light-skinned, white-haired elves. But Maia is only half-eleven, since his mother was a goblin. His skin and hair is dark. This brings to mind racial tensions, but honestly, the author didn't expound much on the potential for bias.

    Instead, Addison chronicles the day to day transformation of Maia, from a frightened, under-confident, ignorant, and yet kind-hearted young emperor to a wise, compassionate, confident, beloved, and grace-fueled leader. The entire book chronicles the first season of his reign, from winter's first snowfall to the heavy spring rains.

    Maia was ignored by his cruel father (the elven emperor) from birth. The emperor rejected Maia and his beloved goblin mother. At age 8, when his mother died, he was sent to live far away in the marshlands with only an abusive drunk and some servants. He received no proper education.

    When he arrived at court to rule at age 18, he was regarded with suspicion and disdain. However, he consistently strove to repudiate his ego and repress his need for vengeance against those who ridiculed him, abused him, attempted to kill him. Instead, he focused on fulfilling his duty to the people. This included building bridges -- of one sort and another.

    Quibbles: It grew a bit boring at times. The characters were difficult to remember. Too many similar sounding foreign names and words to keep track of, and the audio has no glossary, unlike the book. Also, I saw no reason for his abusive cousin Setheris to reasonably expect anything from him. I didn't like his constant need to apologize or beg pardon for no good reason. It grew tiresome and didn't befit an emperor -- as he was advised by his capable secretary, Scevat. (Plus, I don't like being around people who apologize continually. Makes me feel irritable.)

    Maia was almost too good-kind. Not quite credible, nor fully likable. I'm not necessarily a huge fan of grimdark fantasy, but this went too far the other way. I liked Maia best when he showed his "human" side -- expressed interest in beautiful girls, delighted wonder at the model bridge the clockmaker built, grew irritated with having to wear so much jewelry, missed his mama, and told Severis off.

    Probably won't read a sequel, if one is written, but maybe. Despite my quibbles, I found it oddly compelling. Would probably like it better after a second listen. Quite decent writing, easy to follow (except for the exhaustive and highly confusing invented language).

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Death of the Necromancer: Ile-Rien Series, Book 2

    • UNABRIDGED (17 hrs and 53 mins)
    • By Martha Wells
    • Narrated By Derek Perkins
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (24)
    Performance
    (23)
    Story
    (23)

    Nicholas Valiarde is a passionate, embittered nobleman with an enigmatic past. Consumed by thoughts of vengeance, he is consoled only by thoughts of the beautiful, dangerous Madeline. He is also the greatest thief in all of Ile-Rien... On the gaslight streets of the city, Nicholas assumes the guise of a master criminal, stealing jewels from wealthy nobles to finance his quest for vengeance: The murder of Count Montesq.

    Susan says: "Ocean's 11 gang meets Holmes & Watson"
    "Ocean's 11 gang meets Holmes & Watson"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Kingdom-level fantasy with strong elements of magic, mystery, and political conspiracy. Pitch perfect narration. Easy on the ears with discernibly different voices. No irritating breathing sounds, affectations, or mannerisms.

    As for the story, it's got vengeance, vivisection, resurrection, and insurrection. Political intrigue via golems and hedge witches, science and sorcerers, magical paintings and magical trees (a lá Hogwarts), and steampunk-ish spheres melding magic and technology. There's Unsealie Court Dark Fey and cute garden fairies, too (but not a dragon in sight).

    (I listened, didn't read, so names may be misspelled.)

    It's captivating, somewhat heartwarming, fast-paced and coherent. The story is set mostly in a fantastical rendition of old world London (Lodun) and Vienna (Vienne). Horses and carriages, ball gowns and butlers, telegraphs and ... sewers. (Lots of action down in the sewers.)

    The good guys are a band of thieves, a likable cast of ne'er-do-wells reminiscent of Robin Hood. The leader of this gang is Lord Nicholas Valliard (aka Donaten the mastermind thief). His team includes Madeline, an actress and master of disguise (his lover); Cusard, a lock-pick thief; Captain Raynard, a calvary officer wrongfully discharged; and Crock, a prison escapee framed for murder.

    Then there is Nicholas's friend Ariselde, an opium-addicted sorcerer, and Isham (Ariselde's manservant). Eventually Madele, an old hedge-witch, joins in.

    And there's a queen -- fabulous character. In fact, nearly every female in this story is strong: Madeline, her grandmother Madele, the queen.

    Plus, serving the queen is the tenacious and perceptive Inspector Sebastien Ransward, along with his discerning colleague Dr. Halle.

    The villains are varied and many, but Nicholas primarily is after Lord Montesq, who fabricated evidence to frame his beloved adoptive father Edouard, which led to his hanging. Of course, he's first got to put a stop to the Necromancer.

    I like how this author writes, slowly revealing character traits and pertinent life stories, weaving these tidbits into the story over time. Also, she avoids long info dumps, doesn't try so hard to convince me that her magical theories hold water, and goes easy on the internal dialogue, so the pace isn't mired in needless and redundant thoughts. She lets me draw my own conclusions about what the characters might be feeling and thinking. I appreciate this so much.

    This is straight fantasy suspense. Sometimes gory, gruesome, scary. No real romance, since Madeline and Nicholas are already openly in love and cohabiting on page one. Yet their devotion is cool!

    There is a touch of bromance, however, among the members of this Ocean's Eleven team. Crack loves Nicholas, especially. And an intriguing relationship sprouts between Nicholas (channeling a kinder gentler Moriarty) and Inspector Ranswald (a more socially adept Sherlock).

    Some good plot twists.

    My only quibbles are minor: A little too pat at the ending, and I'd be willing to sacrifice some high-octane action scenes and skullduggery for bonding time around the fire. Phew! These guys never get to rest! (Except for poor opium-soaked sorceror, Arisilde -- another fabulous character). Some parts are predictable.

    It's all good. Not sure I would listen to it again and again -- as I do with favorites -- because it didn't totally pull on my heart strings. But maybe I will.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Dog Who Could Fly: The Incredible True Story of a WWII Airman and the Four-Legged Hero Who Flew at His Side

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 2 mins)
    • By Damien Lewis
    • Narrated By Derek Perkins
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (4)
    Performance
    (4)
    Story
    (4)

    An instant hit in the UK, this is the true account of a German shepherd who was adopted by the Royal Air Force during World War II, joined in flight missions, and survived everything from crash-landings to parachute bailouts-ultimately saving the life of his owner and dearest friend. In the winter of 1939 in the cold snow of no-man's-land, two loners met and began an extraordinary journey that would turn them into lifelong friends.

    Jane says: "4 ½ stars. Audiobook needs a pdf file for pictures"
    "Heartwarming and True (mostly)"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Superb narration by Derek Perkins. A five-star performance! The narration improved on the story, I believe, which is saying something. His voice is easy on the ears and distinctly different for dog and man.

    This biographical account is based on personal diaries, BBC footage and reports, and military documents.

    The "story" begins in France late in 1939, when native Czech Airman (bomber) Robert Bozdech is shot down in France, over enemy lines. Hiding out with his wounded pilot in an abandoned farmhouse, he discovers a starving newborn German Shepherd, whom he names Ant / Antis. Unable to abandon the puppy to certain death, he hides Ant inside his jacket and crawls through thick snow across "no man's land" -- bombs dropping from both sides, narrowly missing Robert, Ant, and his pilot Pierre. Within fewer than 24 hours, the young warrior pup is already defending Robert and Pierre.

    In the months and years that followed Antis would save lives several times. This decorated dog rescued civilians buried under rubble in shell-shocked, battle-worn Britain, alerted men and women of incoming attacks at various Royal Air Force bases, and flew alongside his best friend in Wellington fighter planes.

    This account focuses more on the tight bond between dog and man, less on the war itself. Still, there are some interesting war nuggets: Hitler's Czech invasion, Czech airmen joining the French Air Force to fight Nazis, France falling to Hitler, French and Czech soldiers fleeing to England to join the RAF and continue to fight Nazis, the bombing of Britain (so much bombing!), various bomber planes (Wellingtons, Liberators, etc.), and the place of dogs in the military during war (most pets were not allowed during war, so this story is unusual).

    Various secondary characters added much to my enjoyment of the story.

    The quality of the writing is good, not great. The story felt heartwarming. I chuckled several times, and held my breath with worry a few times, too. The pace flowed quickly. I learned something about the war from this unlikely perspective.

    However, some overused phrases (e.g., "he looked deeply into his dog's eyes") cost the book one star, along with the rushed ending. I wanted to know more about Robert's wife and son in Communist Czechoslovakia, and more about his postwar life in England.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Silence for the Dead

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 32 mins)
    • By Simone St. James
    • Narrated By Mary Jane Wells
    Overall
    (25)
    Performance
    (24)
    Story
    (25)

    In 1919 Kitty Weekes - pretty, resourceful, and on the run – falsifies her background to obtain a nursing position at Portis House, a remote hospital for soldiers left shell-shocked by the horrors of the Great War. Hiding the shame of their mental instability in what was once a magnificent private estate, the patients suffer from nervous attacks and tormenting dreams. But something more is going on at Portis House - its plaster is crumbling; its plumbing makes eerie noises; and strange, cold breaths of air waft through the empty rooms.

    Susan says: "Engrossing gothic"
    "Engrossing gothic"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Fabulous narration by Mary Jane Wells. In 1919 England, at a lonely mansion where moors meet sea, 21 "mad" soldiers convalesce from WWI, suffering PTSD. But ghosts that reek of rot and whisper sweet suicide in the patients' ears really inhibit their recovery.

    To this bleak place comes Kitty Weeks, age 20-ish, masquerading as a nurse, fleeing her own murderous father. She's resilient and courageous, but not foolish. And she recognizes the mysterious "patient 16" immediately. Soon enough, they join forces.

    Engrossing, this dark gothic suspense novel. There's even a lovely bit of romance. Heartwarming in a few scenes, as the "madmen" bond against evil and remember who they are.

    Quibble: The characterization of the hospital matron shifted midstream. What??

    Some reviewers felt the plot faltered in the second half. Not so for me. Maybe Wells' narration made the difference. Plus, in the second half we got some heartwarming soldierly scenes and some tender love scenes.

    4.5 stars!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Steal the Dragon

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 28 mins)
    • By Patricia Briggs
    • Narrated By Jennifer James Bradshaw
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (161)
    Performance
    (136)
    Story
    (138)

    Patricia Briggs' "unique" (Kliatt) novel of a slave, swordwielder, and spy gets a second life with an exciting new package to attract the fans that made her Mercy Thompson novels bestsellers.

    Antoinette says: "Narrator tried too hard to sound 'sexy'"
    "Narration improves on weak plot"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Excellent narration by Jennifer James Bradshaw. She differentiated the voices, and sounded not "sexy" (as someone said) but mellifluous, with a smoothly modulated voice.

    As for the story itself, please excuse any misspelling of names, since I listened only. I liked the developing relationship between the healer Tristan (a sylvan, a green magic user) and the empath Riella (escaped slave turned horse whisperer and spy). That was nicely handled, even though Tris pulled a fast one, and should have had to grovel more.

    However, the plot is weak. The final resolution didn't hold together well, because of a sudden character shift. I couldn't see "the prophet" as anything but a slave trader and rapist. His link with "the night god" didn't make sense, since this god was known for providing refuge for the weak, by covering them in darkness, hiding them (not raping or enslaving). Thus, the prophet's characterization went wonky, when Briggs tried to re-draw him as benign, just because he helped... Never mind. No spoilers here. Also, the whole cats plot thread went nowhere, really. I expected more of that.

    This is part of a series, but it can be read as a stand alone, no problem. Overlapping characters are the spymaster (Wren) and the aeMagi.

    Contents include rape, murder, and torture.

    Ignore the title. No dragons, except in a game and a memory.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Mystic and Rider: The Twelve Houses, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 27 mins)
    • By Sharon Shinn
    • Narrated By Jennifer Van Dyck, Sharon Shinn
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (471)
    Performance
    (243)
    Story
    (245)

    The fire mystic Senneth crosses the country of Gillengaria on a mission for the king, trying to discover if noble marlords from the Twelve Houses are planning an uprising. She is accompanied by the soldiers Justin and Tayse, two King's Riders who are unswervingly loyal to the crown. Also on the journey are the shape-changers Kirra and Donnal, and a young mystic named Cammon who can practically read minds.

    Ted says: "Light fantasy, heavy romance"
    "Good start to series."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I liked this one, but didn't feel thoroughly engrossed. Didn't bond deeply to the characters, but I liked them quite well, and bonding may occur in the sequel. My favorite characters are the wild cat (a ralynx?) and the young empathic "sensitive" Cammon. (Spelling may be off.)

    The fantasy elements are somewhat interesting. The plot to overthrow the king made sense, and I was intrigued about the old queen's sudden death followed by the king's hasty new marriage. Intrigued by the princess, never seen.

    The romance was okay, but a bit uninspired. The dialogue is decent. Some good fight scenes. Some cool fire-Mage magic.

    No swearing. No sex. Nothing too violently gruesome. A clean family-safe fantasy.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Raven's Strike

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 25 mins)
    • By Patricia Briggs
    • Narrated By Jennifer James Bradshaw
    Overall
    (175)
    Performance
    (153)
    Story
    (151)

    The Traveler Seraph must use all her cunning and ability as a Raven mage to track down an unimaginable force of destruction known as the Shadowed.

    scottc says: "A great story"
    "Book 2 of 2. Wishing for another!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Fabulous narration. Top notch! As for the story, this is book two of two, a short fantasy series with wizards, ghosts, vampirism, trolls, mistwraithes, wolf-shifters, elemental gods, specially gifted "Travelers" and a little romance. I really bonded with the characters, first introduced in the prequel, Raven's Shadow. They became real to me across these two books. I want to see more of Seraph, Tier, Jes, Hennea, Lehr, Rinnie, Emperor Phoran the 26/27th, and his two loyal guards. I even loved the big black dog and the old war horse.

    Suspenseful, heartwarming, engrossing, and fairly novel. Some grim scenes. Some black magic. Some bardic storytelling, song, and campfire camaraderie, to balance the darker bits. A villain not immediately obvious to me. Great scenes of fierce marital love even after 20 years. Authentic and well-sketched kids (ages about 10, 18, 20) play key roles in both books. Loved watching this family fight shadows together! Loved seeing the kids come into their own. Young Rennie learns to control winds and weather. Lehr learns to hunt, track, and open locks. And Jes learns to integrate his two opposite personas: empath and warrior. Kudos to Briggs for these two books.

    My only gripe is that sometimes the author goes on too long, trying to explain how her magic works, what the "orders" are, who the gods are, and how to bind -- and free -- a person's spirit-entwined order (gift).

    A lovely ending to this duology, but I wish it wouldn't end yet. How about another, dear author? Maybe Lehr could get a story. Or Rinnie.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Raven's Shadow

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 15 mins)
    • By Patricia Briggs
    • Narrated By Jennifer James Bradshaw
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (206)
    Performance
    (179)
    Story
    (179)

    Seraph is a Raven mage who left behind her responsibilities for the love of the ex-soldier Tier. But when Tier disappears, Seraph must use her magic - and fulfill her ancestors’ oath to protect humanity from destruction.

    Jennifer says: "Slow Start - Entertaining"
    "Book 1 of 2. Wishing for 3!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Fabulous narration. Top notch! As for the story, this is book one of two, a short fantasy series with wizards, elemental gods, specially gifted "Travelers" and some romance. I really bonded with the characters introduced in this book. They became real to me across the two books. Wish Briggs would write another book, making a trilogy of it. I want to see more of Seraph, Tier, Jes, Hennea, Lehr, Rinnie, Emperor Phoran the 26/27th, and his two loyal guards. I even loved the big black dog and the old war horse.

    Heartwarming, engrossing, and fairly novel. Some grim scenes. Some black magic. Some bardic storytelling, song, and campfire camaraderie, to balance the darker bits.

    My only gripe is that sometimes the author goes on too long, trying to explain how her magic works, what the "orders" are, who the gods are, etc. But that happens more in book 2 than in this book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Mr. Perfect

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 9 mins)
    • By Linda Howard
    • Narrated By Laura Hicks
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (491)
    Performance
    (431)
    Story
    (434)

    What would make the perfect man? That's the deliciously racy topic that Jaine Bright and her three girlfriends are pondering one night at their favorite after-hours hot spot: Mr. Perfect. Would he be tall, dark, and handsome? Caring and warmhearted - or will just muscular do? As their conversation heats up, they concoct a tongue-in-cheek checklist that becomes an overnight sensation, spreading like wildfire at work and sizzling along email lines. But what began as a joke among friends turns deadly serious when one of the four women is murdered....

    Judy says: "Oldie but Goodie!"
    "Better in text format"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The narrator is probably fine for most listeners, based on the reviews and ratings. For me, her voice modulation was a bit shrill. After 30 minutes, it began to grate a bit. Also, I didn't much care for her vocal characterization of the hero, Sam.

    The story itself was better when I read it, compared to audio. I love the beginning chapters, where Sam and Jane get to know each other. Great car wash scene! Some funny one-liners. Decent dialogue.

    Some parts of the book are skip-worthy, so when reading, I just skim past the sections involving the other three women (Marci, Lena, and TJ) and their love life. I grow impatient with the pages (and audio minutes) spent on this. Instead, I focus on the main characters, Sam and Jane. I also flip past the pages depicting the bloody murder. Repeated explicit sex gets boring, so fast forward there, too.

    So, I'd give the book almost 4 stars (because I skim past the sections I don't care for). In audio format, it's hard to skim over unwanted sections.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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