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crazybatcow

I like Jack Reacher style characters regardless of setting. Put them in outer space, in modern America, in a military setting, on an alien planet... no worries. Book has non moralistic vigilante-justice? Sign me up! (oh, I read urban fantasy, soft and hard sci-fi, trashy vampire and zombie novels too)

East Coast, Canada | Member Since 2012

1970
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 289 reviews
  • 395 ratings
  • 882 titles in library
  • 22 purchased in 2015
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  • Hexed: The Iron Druid Chronicles, Book 2

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 52 mins)
    • By Kevin Hearne
    • Narrated By Luke Daniels
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (9114)
    Performance
    (8192)
    Story
    (8204)

    Atticus O’Sullivan, last of the Druids, doesn’t care much for witches. Still, he’s about to make nice with the local coven by signing a mutually beneficial nonaggression treaty when suddenly the witch population in modern-day Tempe, Arizona, quadruples overnight. And the new girls are not just bad, they’re badasses with a dark history on the German side of World War II. With a fallen angel feasting on local high school students, a horde of Bacchants blowing in from Vegas, and a dangerously sexy Celtic goddess of fire vying for his attention, Atticus is having trouble scheduling the witch hunt.

    A. Sentoni says: "Authenticity, Humor and Brilliant Writing"
    "If you liked book one, you'll like this too."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I was a bit leery at the start since it felt like it might be a bit lecture-y on the nature of faith - i.e. there's a whole conversion with the Widow Donahue near the beginning that results in having some weapon blessed, but which felt like a discussion of faith and prayer.

    This lecture-moment passed pretty quickly though and the story was actually a bit more action-packed and a bit faster paced than book one was. I'm not sure Oberon was quite as pithy-funny in this book, but there are humorous comments throughout the story which lighten the mood a bit. It's chock full of mythical/religious references which make the story seem authentic (yeah, I know it's fantasy, but still, this makes it feel very realistic).

    Overall, it's as good as the first in the series, so if you liked that one, you'll like this. (The story does stand alone, but you probably won't enjoy this story as much if you didn't read book one first.) This story is wrapped up in the end, but there are some threads left hanging which will have to be tied up in the next installment so I'm starting book three now to find out how Atticus is going to fulfill his obligations.

    The narration is excellent.

    11 of 14 people found this review helpful
  • The Black Company: Chronicles of The Black Company, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 54 mins)
    • By Glen Cook
    • Narrated By Marc Vietor
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1376)
    Performance
    (1014)
    Story
    (1020)

    Some feel the Lady, newly risen from centuries in thrall, stands between humankind and evil. Some feel she is evil itself. The hardbitten men of the Black Company take their pay and do what they must, burying their doubts with their dead - until the prophesy: The White Rose has been reborn, somewhere, to embody good once more. There must be a way for the Black Company to find her....

    Peter says: "Great Story, Narrator Takes Getting Used To"
    "Should have left it on the bookshelf...forever..."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    err... probably I shouldn't have gotten this in audio format - in paper format I could have skimmed the pages and pages of descriptive babble. Actually, I shouldn't have gotten it in paper format either. It should have stayed on the bookshelf.

    There is no real plot - it's just a bunch of blah-blah about some mercenaries and the battles they get into. The author is very descriptive and explains every detail, for example, about swinging a sword in battle and how it impacts and what happens after it impacts, and so on. It is not graphic though, just overly detailed. It's kinda like Cook wanted to copy Joe Abercrombie's work in its wordiness and focus on the steps involved in completing a task, but written for a YA audience, so there is no blood or guts or bad words. Oh, and there is no sense that justice is being sought, and no vigilante action... it's a straight up "group of men with various magical powers go to A and kill people, then go to B and are attacked, then go to C and have a battle"... ad nauseam. We don't know why they are doing this (other than it's their job), and we don't care since they aren't trying to right any wrongs, or solve any problems.

    So, essentially, it is long and boring and who really cares what happens to these wordily-described characters? Although there are pages and pages devoted to describing what they look like and their actions (i.e. they play cards a lot... yes, he describes their card games... "Goblin played card A, Raven played card B, then Bob won by turning over an ace")....they are all cutouts, except maybe the main character, and he's only fleshed out because he talks incessantly. Literally - talks incessantly - about everything: "person A did this and person B did that and person C laughed"... and so on. Too bad we don't care.

    If you like the premise of dark/violent fantasy, try anything by Abercrombie (extremely dark) , or Brett's Warded Man (less violent than Abercrombie), or even Weeks' Way of Shadows... All of them are what this book seems to be trying to be.

    The narration is okay - given how the book was written, I'm not sure he had much to work with. There is no swearing or gore or sex. I won't be reading any more in the series since I need there to be some plot or goal, and, if there is violence, I need it to be to the point, not half-hidden in descriptive babble that goes on for 15 minutes at a time.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Return Man

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 2 mins)
    • By V. M. Zito
    • Narrated By Bernard Clark
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (129)
    Performance
    (121)
    Story
    (124)

    The outbreak tore the US in two. The East remains a safe haven. The West has become a ravaged wilderness, known by survivors as the Evacuated States. It is here that Henry Marco makes his living. Hired by grieving relatives, he tracks down the dead and delivers peace. Now Homeland Security wants Marco for a mission unlike any other: He must return to California, where the apocalypse began. Where a secret is hidden. And where his own tragic past waits to punish him again.

    Mike Naka says: "wtf a zombie assassin? yes, but much more!"
    "An action novel, with a side of zombies"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    It is a slightly different take on zombies... instead of it being about someone running from a zombie breakout, it's an action novel about guy on a mission in the middle of a zombie breakout. The characters here are not trying to deal with or cure zombies, and they aren't even trying to "find a safe place from them" - they just need to survive them to complete another mission.

    There were a couple points where I wondered if the motivation behind the main character remaining in zombieland was believable, but ultimately I think it was. It made sense that he would have an outstanding "mission" that kept him from going to a safe zone, and it was perfectly reasonable to accept that he was a damaged man completing some self-imposed punishment.

    While there is plenty of zombie action (which is a bit on the gory side), it really comes across as an action novel, it just happens to involve zombies in addition to human enemies. There were some moments where, perhaps, the introspection went a little too deep, and there was a little "break through" of the author's political views into the storyline... but these were both minor and infrequent. Some of the scenes are over the top, and extended to add gore value, but... overall it was a reasonably average action novel, slightly above average zombie novel, and generally a good read.

    I'd give it 4 stars as a zombie novel and 3 stars as an action novel. While it doesn't contain much foul language or any sex, it is on the gory side of the zombie spectrum... maybe not as graphic as some, but definitely detailed and graphic enough that I'll mention it. The narration was good.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Exoskeleton: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 37 mins)
    • By Shane Stadler
    • Narrated By Patrick Conn
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (192)
    Performance
    (175)
    Story
    (172)

    A convicted felon is given a choice following his sentencing: serve a 25-year conventional prison sentence...or spend 365 days in a new, experimental corrections program. He opts for the experimental program, only to realize he has made a horrible mistake. A dark tale of science spun dangerously out of control, Exoskeleton will leave even the most jaded of listeners quaking in their boots.

    Molly says: "Exoskeleton - now I get it"
    "Step below B grade novel - more horror than sci-fi"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I think I must be the only reviewer here on Audible who was not paid or given a free book to review this novel. There is no way this story is even a 3 star, let alone anything higher than that. Period. Oh, and it doesn't fit in the science fiction genre - it is a horror story.

    The book seems okay as it starts, but just got worse as it went on. It spent way too much time discussing/detailing torture, and the longer it went on, the more times the same (or similar) torture scenes were explored. It isn't really that graphic, just... repetitive and detailed and every torture scene was described in detail - being *just that little bit worse* than the scene before. There are only so many times we need to hear about the pain being so bad that he blacked out, or nearly blacked out, or greyed out or defecated, etc. And, seriously, all these people torturing him doesn't make any sense - there can't be an entire organization of sadists who have the sole goal of creating as much pain as is possible... as a job...

    For 3/4 of the book, the torture seems pointless but it does turn out that there is some (albeit foolish) rationale behind it. Why they went through the hassle of obtaining and using Will (as opposed to any other existing convict) was not explained, however. (There was some attempt to explain this by there being a shortage of convicts available, but... realistically, in the U.S. penal system there would have been hundreds of thousands of eligible convicts who didn't need to be framed in order to be used as a guinea pig.)

    Some specific annoyances: people scratch an itch... they don't itch it. The "spiritual/philosophical"component (as a result of torture) was lame. It seems it is there to give the author a chance to talk about post-death or souls, or the nature of existence. But coming from an author that doesn't know when to use "itch" and when to use "scratch", it was very hard to take seriously.

    All in all... it was an annoying book to finish: there was a lot of jumping back and forth between (mostly) irrelevant characters who all sound the same, a plot that is ultimately fantastical/supernatural but is presented as if it is realistic, and a setting that is conveniently contrived just so the setting will be correct for the author's "spiritual" exploration.

    The narration is not very good. He emphasizes the wrong part of the sentence sometimes -making statements sound like questions - and pronounces some words incorrectly (femur as fe-mure and epitome as epi-TOME). He also laughs or coughs when the characters in the book do (but thank goodness he didn't scream when the characters screamed). I won't be looking for more books by this author, and would think twice before buying books read by this narrator.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Aurora: CV-01: Frontiers Saga, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 15 mins)
    • By Ryk Brown
    • Narrated By Jeffrey Kafer
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (610)
    Performance
    (553)
    Story
    (558)

    world recovering from a devastating plague. A brutal enemy threatening invasion. A young man seeking to escape the shadow of his father. A ship manned by a crew of fresh academy graduates. A top-secret experimental propulsion system. A questionable alliance with a mysterious green-eyed woman. What destiny has in store for the crew of the UES Aurora is far greater than any of them could ever imagine. And this is only the beginning....

    John C. says: "90% SciFi, 10% Cheese"
    "Summary headline: boy-man saves the day"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Ender's game anyone?

    Of course, not nearly as well written.

    Bad boy (who is chronologically mature, but written like a teenager) who turns out to be just enough of a rebel that he makes an outstanding leader (i.e. can save the world by thinking outside the box while everyone else (mostly females) are still arguing over what they should do).

    If women weren't needed for the males in this story to oogle and have sex (or think about having sex) with, there'd be no women at all in this story.

    Or... maybe a more accurate analogy would be a Star Trek episode where Wesley Crusher becomes captain at age 14 but has Kirk's libido. Yes, that sums up the "child-prodigy with chip on his shoulder + let's drool over how hot all the women are in their tight uniforms" tone.

    And, other than that... it's a standard, unoriginal sci-fi story that feels like it stole its storyline from a hodgepodge of nearly all the classic sci-fi books written by good authors... minus the part that includes good writing. (i.e. space battles won by dint of boy (err, I mean man) being super talented and lucky, space ships with new tech being sent off on maiden voyage, transluminal spaceship flight to uncharted areas of space, first contact with another planet's inhabitants, etc).

    And the farther I get into it, the worse it becomes. I think I read somewhere that this is a first novel... and I hope that is true, because it certainly sounds like a newbie wrote this, fresh after watching a 4 day Star Trek marathon on the Space channel.

    The narration is actually quite good. It's the unoriginal storyline and tell-not-show approach that makes this story un-enjoyable. (Oh, and the author jumps from inside one character's thoughts to inside another characters thoughts without any pauses- so we get to see this unoriginal story from everyone's point of view.). Unfortunately, I have the next book in the series already, but I won't be reading it.

    There is some adolescent sexual innuendo/sex, but no graphic sex, violence or language.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • I Hear the Sirens in the Street: A Detective Sean Duffy Novel - The Troubles Trilogy, Book 2

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 42 mins)
    • By Adrian McKinty
    • Narrated By Gerard Doyle
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (882)
    Performance
    (794)
    Story
    (790)

    A torso in a suitcase looks like an impossible case, but Sean Duffy isn’t easily deterred, especially when his floundering love life leaves him in need of a distraction. So with detective constables McCrabban and McBride, he goes to work identifying the victim. The torso turns out to be all that’s left of an American tourist who once served in the U.S. military. What was he doing in Northern Ireland in the midst of the 1982 Troubles?

    Dave says: "Utterly brilliant"
    "Make sure you're okay with Irish politics"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I read the first book in this series first - and I think this is required. The story itself is separate from the first one, but this book will make much more sense if you do read book one first since it sets the stage, give the background for Duffy's world, and starts Duffy down the path he is taking in this book.

    If you did not like the Irish politics of book one, it is as thick here as it was there. In fact, if this story were to be pulled out of that setting, it would be a much weaker story. A lot of the obstacles that Duffy has to deal with are direct results of the political turmoil during the "Troubles".

    I'm not familiar with that era, but accepted it as the backdrop of Duffy's detecting (it is a detective novel, underneath all the politics), and think it made the novel dark (noir) and heavy (in a good way). It is a violent (but non-gory) novel and there are no sex scenes.

    The narration is very good, but it is a heavy Irish accent that you might have to get used to. I got the next one in the series on Audible as soon as I finished this one. Ghosts of Belfast is a read-alike book here on Audible, read by the same narrator (and it has the same setting and same noir tone).

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Quarantined

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 9 mins)
    • By Joe McKinney
    • Narrated By Therese Plummer
    Overall
    (93)
    Performance
    (85)
    Story
    (86)

    The citizens of San Antonio, Texas, are threatened with extermination by a terrifying outbreak of the flu. Quarantined by the military to contain the virus, the city is in a desperate struggle to survive. Inside the quarantine walls, Detective Lily Harris is working burial statistics duty at the Scar, San Antonio's mass graveyard, when she finds a murder victim hidden amongst the plague dead.

    crazybatcow says: "It's a viral outbreak quarantine. Zero zombies."
    "It's a viral outbreak quarantine. Zero zombies."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Okay. First things first. This book has nothing to do with zombies. Absolutely nothing...

    What it is: a murder/detective story set in a city that was quarantined because of a viral outbreak that kills nearly 20% of the people it infects.

    It was pretty realistic... well, the setting and goings-on (riots, looters, fear) that occur within the quarantined city was realistic. The belief that a government would be able to successfully seal off a city with flown in barricades before someone "escaped" to spread the virus to the rest of the country was a bit on the naive side. When the virus that ends up jumping species to wipe out 20-30% of us finally does arrive, it will be spread much much too fast for any government to lock it down as quickly as they do in this story.

    It wasn't very original, or stunningly written, but it was a decent story, with engaging enough characters that they don't really drive you crazy. The main character was female, and the author does need a bit more experience living as/with a woman because the woman here is written as a stereotype... (i.e. an entire scene is written around her having a bath and shaving her legs... like that would be a priority in a virally infected world where she has a murder to solve). I won't mention the lame sex scene (it should have been left out it was that pathetic). And there are periodic (and fortunately short) tirades about women's self-esteem as affected by magazines, Republican suppression, and evil organizations who would rather let millions of people die than lose out on potential profits. You won't be left wondering how the author feels about any of these topics.

    Anyway... it's a quick read, with some insights on what "real life" might be like in a quarantined city... and what challenges a detective might face while trying to solve a murder under these circumstances. I'd read more by this author, as long as I was prepared for uninspiring characterizations and a heavy reliance on stereotypical physical descriptions and behaviours.

    I didn't mind the narration - it wasn't intrusive, and I didn't notice any mispronunciations (other than a couple HWO instead of WHO), but, then again, I'm not from Texas. It is not gory or graphic and I don't think there was any swearing.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Vicious Circle

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 22 mins)
    • By Mike Carey
    • Narrated By Michael Kramer
    Overall
    (676)
    Performance
    (407)
    Story
    (410)

    Felix Castor has reluctantly returned to exorcism after the case of the Bonnington Archive ghost convinced him that he really can do some good with his abilities ("good," of course, being a relative term when dealing with the undead). But his friend, Rafi, is still possessed; the succubus Ajulutsikael (Juliet to her friends) still technically has a contract on him; and he's still dirt poor.

    Cather says: "A worthy sequel"
    "Hard-boiled detective story, with ghosts"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    It is a hard-boiled detective story, in an urban fantasy setting. Oh yeah, and includes ghosts/demons/undead as "citizens". The lines of good and evil don't follow the traditional paths: here some humans are bad, some undead are good, and some of each are the opposite.

    The story is a bit slow to pick up... I actually got a bit frustrated with the delay in the story gearing up because I had selected this book for a trip and didn't have any alternatives handy, and I wanted an immediate escape from flight delays. I think the delay was to set the backdrop and introduce the main characters of Felix's world.

    Fortunately, the story does pick up not too far in, and once it did, it became a very engaging mystery/detective novel. The mystery Felix is trying to solve might be non-traditional (ghosts), but the detective-procedural was actual pretty "normal". It was traditional hard work and a few hard knocks that allowed Felix to solve the mystery, not a deus-ex-machina.

    I think if you read the first book in the series and liked it, you'd like this one at least as much, maybe more since there isn't as much time fleshing out the world. If you hadn't read the first book, though, I still think you can start with this one and not be lost for long - the slow part at the beginning sets up the world sufficiently for newcomers, and the detective story is completely stand-alone.

    The narration is very good. It is not gory or graphic and I don't think there was much (if any) swearing. If you liked the first couple Joe Pitt (vampire) books by Charlie Huston - (only the first couple, they got lecture-y by the series end) - this has a very similar tone/humor.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • The Cold, Cold Ground

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 3 mins)
    • By Adrian McKinty
    • Narrated By Gerard Doyle
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1564)
    Performance
    (1363)
    Story
    (1358)

    Adrian McKinty was born in Carrickfergus, Northern Ireland. He studied politics and philosophy at Oxford before moving to America in the early 1990s. Living first in Harlem, he found employment as a construction worker, barman, and bookstore clerk. In 2000 he moved to Denver to become a high school English teacher and it was there that he began writing fiction.

    Alan says: "What a stunning book"
    "How much is story, how much narrator?"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Okay... I'll be honest by saying that I delayed writing my review and, at first, I got this series mixed up with Stuart Neville's... I thought it might have been only because they are both set in Ireland but... I think the main characters are similar as well, and the books have a noir tone to them, and, of course, Doyle narrates both of them. Excellently, btw.

    That being said, this is an interesting and engaging series, even though it is a bit thick with Irish politics and the "Troubles" which are foreign to someone of my age and nationality. I am vaguely aware of the circumstances of Ireland in the 80s, but never lived them, so the stage set for this story was not at all familiar to me.

    So, if you were to look at the reviews of the paper version of the book, you might find that some reviewers had a little rant about the veracity of some of the author's settings, I didn't read this book for historical accuracy and am okay not knowing any better. And I have no idea why some readers found the author's writing style or language choices to be pretentious... maybe they were reading it as a literary exploration of Ireland during the 80s and saw things in it that weren't really there? Or maybe it's as simple as Doyle making the story come alive in his narration and those who read the book in paper form missed all this.

    Fortunately, I read this book hoping it was a noir detective story... and that's exactly what it is. It is dark and violent and a bit confusing as to what motivated people to behave the way they did, but that's what makes it worth reading - to figure it out. I bought the rest of the series on Audible for full price as soon as I finished this one.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Germline: The Subterrene War, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 12 mins)
    • By T. C. McCarthy
    • Narrated By Donald Corren
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (97)
    Performance
    (80)
    Story
    (81)

    One hundred years from now, Russia and the United States are at odds again. This time the war has gone hot. Heavily armored soldiers battle genetically engineered troops hundreds of meters below the icy, mineral-rich mountains of Kazakhstan. War is Oscar Wendell’s ticket to greatness. A reporter for the Stars and Stripes, he has the only one-way ticket to the front lines. The front smells of blood and fire and death—it smells like a Pulitzer.

    crazybatcow says: "A military sci-fi that isn't sci-fi at all"
    "A military sci-fi that isn't sci-fi at all"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    It is a military sci-fi that doesn't include weapon-porn (so we are not subjected to what size rounds fit in which type of gun, nor how many revolutions ammunition might make in a gun barrel, or the armour penetration per inch by weapon type, etc). I like military-ish fiction that doesn't include gun/military enthusiasts' fantasies, so this book fit the bill for me.

    Sure, some of the military stuff was glossed over, and some of the sci-fi was glossed over... and really, it wasn't all that sci-fi-y. It's almost like a straight up "look, I survived an atrocious war even though I came out scarred" novel. There was nothing in it that is outside the current realm of possibility: although some of the tech might not actually exist yet, the theories behind the tech does.

    But the book isn't really even about war, it's about the people impacted by war...

    The main character isn't a soldier. And that means we get to see a very long war from an alternative point of view. I also think it allowed Oscar to be better written, and more humanized than he would have been if he was a proper soldier. i.e. there was no real harm in him being high as a kite in the midst of battle since he wasn't really supposed to be there anyway.

    The story is actually one of growth and maturity: it's the maturation of one man - because of, or in spite of, a horrendous war background. There is some (not overly moralistic) message about how war scars people psychologically, and how our veterans may not receive the respect and help they require after returning... particularly in circumstances where the "war" has slipped from the front page.

    The narration is fine. Surprisingly, there is not much gore or swearing, and there is no detailed sex. The story is wrapped up completely at the end.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Teckla: Vlad Taltos, Book 3

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 13 mins)
    • By Steven Brust
    • Narrated By Bernard Setaro Clark
    Overall
    (216)
    Performance
    (187)
    Story
    (190)

    Soon after the events of Jhereg, Vlad becomes embroiled in a struggle between the House of the Jhereg and a group of revolutionaries that his wife has joined.

    Ron says: "Rebel Uprising"
    "Oh my! Not even close to what it should be..."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Hmmm... after reading the first book in this series, I immediately bought the remainder of the books because I figured they would all be similar in quality and tone. Now I am worried that I was mistaken.

    The first book was a noir vigilante book set in a foreign (fantasy) world. The second was more along the lines of an almost-noir detective novel, and although there was not much vigilantism, the dark theme remained. This one was... well... a soap opera-y philosophical fiction. It had no detective work going on; it had no noir; it had no vigilantism. It was more than a bit on the lecture-y side (oh, look how bad "THE MAN" is and how the "system" controls us) and involved the main character essentially pacing back and forth (literally, from one side of town to another, and figuratively in trying to figure out his wife) and bemoaning the apparent breakdown of his marriage (in the face of her struggle against governmental control of "the people").

    See my disappointment? It is missing all the features I enjoy (vigilantes, noir, detectives) and includes some of my main pet peeves (morals and lectures). And what was left - man pulling his hair out over relationship breakdown - really didn't tickle my emotional armpits. I simply didn't care. Maybe I'm callous, or maybe Brust simply is better at writing noir than emotional pieces.

    I really hope the next one is back to the good stuff because this one was just not worth reading. If this had been the first book I'd read by Brust, it would have been the last. In fact, I'm half tempted to ask for my money back because I feel like I was ripped off - I thought I was buying a noir fantasy with vigilante overtones and I got a philosophical political treatise instead.

    The narration is fine. There is nothing gory or graphic and I don't think there is any swearing.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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