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Gaius

Lafayette, IN, United States

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  • 1 reviews
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  • 11 titles in library
  • 0 purchased in 2014
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  • The Map That Changed the World: William Smith and the Birth of Modern Geology

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 59 mins)
    • By Simon Winchester
    • Narrated By Simon Winchester
    Overall
    (318)
    Performance
    (138)
    Story
    (139)

    In 1793, William Smith, the orphan son of a village blacksmith, made a startling discovery that was to turn the science of geology on its head. While surveying the route for a canal near Bath, he noticed that the fossils found in one layer of the rocks he was excavating were very different from those found in another. And out of that realization came an epiphany: that by following these fossils one could trace layers of rocks as they dipped, rose and fell, clear across England and clear across the world.

    reggie p says: "Geology made interesting"
    "Enjoyable"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I enjoy the history of the earth and the history of societies and this book encapsulates the two rather well. You get a good idea of the time which Smith lived, the ideas that abounded, and the man himself. William Smith reminds me a bit of Tesla in that he was a brilliant, eccentric man who was ambitious, but for some reason didn't finish things that could have solidified his career. Other books will do better to describe in detail the history of the earth via stratigraphy, but few will paint a better picture of how it was dicovered. It's just too bad WIlliam Smith wasn't a better diarist because it would have allowed Winchester to offer more from the mind of a man who's thoughts seem to be as hidden as the fossils he helped to unearth. A nice compliment to this book would be Alan Cutler's "The Seahell on the Mountaintop".

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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