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Michael

Forney, TX, United States

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  • Does the Noise in My Head Bother You?: A Rock 'n' Roll Memoir

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 1 min)
    • By Steven Tyler
    • Narrated By Jeremy Davidson
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (401)
    Performance
    (277)
    Story
    (281)

    The son of a classical pianist straight out of the Bronx of old Archie comics, Steven Tyler was born to be a rock star. Weaned on Cole Porter, Nat King Cole, Mick and his beloved Janis Joplin, Tyler began tearing up the streets and the stage as a teenager before finally meeting his "mutant twin" and legendary partner, Joe Perry. In this addictively listenable memoir, Tyler unabashedly recounts the meteoric rise, fall, and rise of Aerosmith over the last three decades and riffs on the music that gives it all meaning.

    Damian says: "Reads true to the man and true to music"
    "I WAS a big Aerosmith fan..."
    Overall

    For years I believed that Aerosmith was one of the lucky bands. A band who finally found enduring staying power because they had ditched the pharmacological crutch that typified their early years, and were able to draw from the darkness music that was able to reach people on a deep level. I'm not sure that's the case any longer.

    When I saw this audiobook available earlier today I very quickly spent a credit to get it. Everyone knows that Steve Tyler is a world class wordsmith, and the book being written as if he just dictated it CAN be entertaining. For me the problems arrive with the first three chapters (as far as I've gotten so far) glorifying his use of drugs. Three hours into it I know that he spent his teenage years drunk, high, and tripping. That's a pretty common story for people in his age range. However, where most of his colleagues look back on that time feeling lucky to have made it out the other side, he seems to look back on those experiences as the "good 'ol days". Don't get me wrong these events are all part of who made him the man he is, but where is the redemption? Where is the acknowledgement that he got lucky? Does he never look back at his Janice Joplin, Jimmi Hendrix, Kieth Moon, John Bohnam, or any of the other musical greats whom he idolized, and realize that he is lucky to have avoided their fates? Sadly at the three hour mark the answer is "No". To be fare, drugs aren't the only things that he idolizes. He also idolizes Woodstock, Hippie communes, and all sorts of "universal vibration" theories. Honestly he is not the man I hoped he was, but hey maybe the book will get better...

    On the plus side, Jeremy Davidson does a fantastic job giving voice to the hallucinogenic tripe that has so far been vomited onto the page.

    9 of 18 people found this review helpful

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