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Sean

BELVEDERE TIBURON, CA, United States | Member Since 2009

265
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 49 reviews
  • 72 ratings
  • 1 titles in library
  • 7 purchased in 2014
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FOLLOWERS
26

  • The Mansion of Happiness: A History of Life and Death

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 41 mins)
    • By Jill Lepore
    • Narrated By Coleen Marlo
    Overall
    (22)
    Performance
    (19)
    Story
    (20)

    Renowned Harvard scholar and New Yorker staff writer Jill Lepore has composed a strikingly original, ingeniously conceived, and beautifully crafted history of American ideas about life and death from before the cradle to beyond the grave. How does life begin? What does it mean? What happens when we die? “All anyone can do is ask,” Lepore writes. “That’s why any history of ideas about life and death has to be, like this book, a history of curiosity.” As much a meditation on the present as an excavation of the past, The Mansion of Happiness is delightful.

    Sean says: "Disappointing"
    "Disappointing"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The book does not engage in any philosophical discussion of life and death, despite the title. The author talks about breast pumps, cryogenics and birth control without venturing an opinion about them.

    She seems more interested in the biographies of people who were associated with various movements than in discussing our attitudes of life and death. Rather than taking a stand on an issue the reader is left to determine the author's position by how sympathetically she paints the protagonists. The subject matter is so rich it is hard to believe that she did not dive into it with more conviction.

    The performance is very good. It is read with excellent pacing and inflection and the narrator's voice is pleasant.

    Despite the title this is not a reflection on life and death. I'm still not sure what it is.

    4 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • Decoding the Heavens

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 36 mins)
    • By Jo Marchant
    • Narrated By Julie Eickhoff
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (6)
    Performance
    (5)
    Story
    (6)

    In Decoding the Heavens, Jo Marchant tells for the first time the full story of the 100-year quest to decipher the ancient Greek computer known as the Antikythera Mechanism. Along the way she unearths a diverse cast of remarkable characters and explores the deep roots of modern technology in ancient Greece and the medieval European and Islamic worlds. At its heart, this is an epic adventure and mystery, a book that challenges our assumptions about technology through the ages.

    Sean says: "Very satisfying account of an ancient mystery"
    "Very satisfying account of an ancient mystery"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The book describes the finding and investigation of one of the most enigmatic ancient artifacts. Many theories have swirled around it (Aliens!) but in 2006 a group of math, astronomy and imaging specialists finally determined the purpose of the existing fragments.

    She does a great job of describing the initial find and the first enthusiastic but erroneous interpretations of what the device was. All of the standard academic personalities are here--the Dreamer, the Enthusiastic Amatuer, the Double-crosser, the Possessive Curators, the serendipitous encounters.

    I was particularly impressed by how she explained the subtleties of translating irregularities of lunar and solar motion into clockwork. Her descriptions of the actual bronze fragments were less clear, but since they are apparently barely recognizable as gears this is easy to forgive. She also describes future possibilities for investigation since there may have been more to the device than was recovered.

    I was less happy with the performance. The reader has a whimsical delivery that the text really doesn't support, but her reading is accurate and easy to understand.

    I would recommend this to someone interested in classical Greece and science history in general.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The 30 Greatest Orchestral Works

    • ORIGINAL (24 hrs and 52 mins)
    • By The Great Courses
    • Narrated By Professor Robert Greenberg
    Overall
    (86)
    Performance
    (80)
    Story
    (78)

    Over the centuries, orchestral music has given us a category of works that stand apart as transcendent expressions of the human spirit. What are these "greatest of the greats"? Find out in these 32 richly detailed lectures that take you on a sumptuous grand tour of the symphonic pieces that continue to live at the center of our musical culture.These 30 masterworks form an essential foundation for any music collection and a focal point for understanding the orchestral medium and deepening your insight into the communicative power of music.

    Jacob says: "Really happy with the format"
    "This is what audio books were made for"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    As someone with an extremely limited knowledge of music I have always felt intimidated by classical compositions. I could not tell you the difference between a symphony and a concerto, but after listening to these lectures I have a much better appreciation of them.

    The lecturer's delivery is a cross of Lewis Black and George Will--authoritative but wickedly funny. He actually made me laugh out loud a few times. His passion for these works comes through in every lecture.

    The format he follows is a brief bio-sketch of the composer followed by snippets of music and commentary. When he says "notice how the composer uses dissonant harmonies to convey struggle" you can actually hear it. Each lecture is meant to be complete in itself allowing you to jump around, but I found listening beginning to end to be most convenient.

    This is an ideal work for an audio book.

    11 of 11 people found this review helpful
  • The Ultimate History of Video Games: From Pong to Pokemon: The Story Behind the Craze that Touched Our Lives and Changed the World

    • UNABRIDGED (21 hrs and 2 mins)
    • By Steven Kent
    • Narrated By Dan Woren
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (51)
    Performance
    (50)
    Story
    (50)

    The Ultimate History of Video Games reveals everything you ever wanted to know and more about the unforgettable games that changed the world, the visionaries who made them, and the fanatics who played them. From the arcade to television and from the PC to the handheld device, video games have entraced kids at heart for nearly 30 years. And author and gaming historian Steven L. Kent has been there to record the craze from the very beginning.

    Orion Burdick says: "Focuses on the industry more than the games"
    "Repetitive but interesting"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is a well researched book but it could be half as long if he didn't repeat himself so often.

    He presents many nuggets of video game lore. Often he has found the original sources for stories that have become myths. This allows him to tell the myth and the real events that generated the story. This is not the repetition I am complaining about.

    When presenting details of a story his style is like this:

    They started having problems with their chips around this time. "Our engineers said that there was a problem with the chips."--Joe CEO. "I was working as an engineer at that time and we encountered several problems with the chips."--Jim Engineer.

    Each iteration of the information adds nothing to the story and it becomes very frustrating to listen to.

    This appears to be the definitive work on video game history, but the writing makes it difficult to get through.

    4 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • Dreamland: Adventures in the Strange Science of Sleep

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 41 mins)
    • By David K. Randall
    • Narrated By Andy Caploe
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (45)
    Performance
    (42)
    Story
    (43)

    Like many of us, journalist David K. Randall never gave sleep much thought. That is, until he began sleepwalking. One midnight crash into a hallway wall sent him on an investigation into the strange science of sleep. In Dreamland, Randall explores the research that is investigating those dark hours that make up nearly a third of our lives.

    Sean says: "Terrible performance of an average book"
    "Terrible performance of an average book"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    There have been many recent advances in sleep science and the author takes you on a slightly dreamy tour of them. The performance assaults your ear with bad foreign accents an unnecessary caricatures.

    The material is disjointed and the author repeats himself in different sections--possibly because he expected people to jump around to the chapters they were interested in. Not being a scientist he makes the various sources understandable for the layperson. But this also makes it difficult for him to analyse the material and he often presents conflicting points of view without any effort to say which is more likely to be correct. He's basically serving up everything he read and letting you sort through it.

    I had to skip certain sections because the reader adopts a nasal, whiny voice whenever he's quoting a study or an interviewee--even ones that are clearly authoritative or completely correct. It's like he's saying "this is how all geeks and nerds talk." He also feels obliged to use British, French and Austrian (Freud) accents if the source material allows.

    Without good synthesis or a critical eye for the data you could do almost as well for yourself by Googling "sleep science."

    8 of 8 people found this review helpful
  • Quantum Man: Richard Feynman’s Life in Science

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 11 mins)
    • By Lawrence M. Krauss
    • Narrated By Lawrence M. Krauss
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (188)
    Performance
    (138)
    Story
    (133)

    Perhaps the greatest physicist of the second half of the 20th century, Richard Feynman changed the way we think about quantum mechanics, the most perplexing of all physical theories. Here Lawrence M. Krauss, himself a theoretical physicist and best-selling author, offers a unique scientific biography: a rollicking narrative coupled with clear and novel expositions of science at the limits.

    Thomas C. Miller says: "Richard Feynman's Science"
    "Excellent book for science history buffs"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is an excellent book about Richard Feynman's contributions to physics over his long, storied career. It is not a biography, although one has a great sense of the man by the end.

    The author discusses his contributions to theoretical physics in detail and a basic familiarity with the concepts of relativity and quantum mechanics are required. There are no equations, so math skills are not required but if you are not already acquainted with the fundamental problems of modern physics there won't be much for you to enjoy.

    The performance was excellent. I was genuinely surprised at the end to find I had been listening to the author the whole time. I suppose the text required someone well versed in theoretical physics but his performance is engaging and inflects and enunciates better than some professional readers I have listened to.

    I would highly recommend the book for someone who is a fan of Dr Feynman's and wants a better understanding of why he is such a legend in the world of physics.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Dad Is Fat

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 26 mins)
    • By Jim Gaffigan
    • Narrated By Jim Gaffigan
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1369)
    Performance
    (1256)
    Story
    (1253)

    In Dad is Fat, stand-up comedian Jim Gaffigan, who’s best known for his legendary riffs on Hot Pockets, bacon, manatees, and McDonald's, expresses all the joys and horrors of life with five young children - everything from cousins ("celebrities for little kids") to toddlers’ communication skills ("they always sound like they have traveled by horseback for hours to deliver important news"), to the eating habits of four-year-olds ("there is no difference between a four-year-old eating a taco and throwing a taco on the floor").

    Sean says: "Good for Gaffigan fans - better for expecting dads"
    "Solid, predictable humor"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Observational parenting humor that doesn't break new ground. The book is funny enough but he does recycle material from his stand-up act and if you are not a parent the material probably won't resonate with you as well.

    I was happy that he actually read the book instead of performing it in his comedic persona. I don't think the onstage delivery would stand up over 6 hours.

    He wanders frequently between humor and reflection so sometimes you are expecting a punchline until you realize that he's just talking and not delivering a joke. The reflections are rather banal (the term "MILF" bothers him because it's not respectful of motherhood. Really? That point needed to be made in a book called "Dad is Fat"?) and tend to slow down the pacing.

    It could have been better if he edited it down to the really funny content, but it's still very enjoyable.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Bonobo and the Atheist

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 9 mins)
    • By Frans de Waal
    • Narrated By Jonathan Davis
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (60)
    Performance
    (53)
    Story
    (52)

    In this lively and illuminating discussion of his landmark research, esteemed primatologist Frans de Waal argues that human morality is not imposed from above but instead comes from within. Moral behavior does not begin and end with religion but is in fact a product of evolution. For many years, de Waal has observed chimpanzees soothe distressed neighbors and bonobos share their food. Now he delivers fascinating fresh evidence for the seeds of ethical behavior in primate societies that further cements the case for the biological origins of human fairness.

    Gary says: "Masterful presentation of interesting topic"
    "Meandering but thought provoking"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I'm a big fan of the author and really enjoyed "Our Inner Ape." I enjoyed this book less. The writing is interesting but the book has an unstructured, unfinished feel to it.

    He draws on his vast primatology experience to address the question "how can we have morality without God?" Using many insightful stories about chimps, bonobos and other monkeys he demonstrates that evolution has given us an innate moral sense that only recently (in anthropologic time) has been transplanted to the institution of religion.

    He never clearly lays out this very delicate and complicated argument. His style is more throw everything at the wall and see what sticks. I never had a sense of what would be coming next and there was no systematic refutation of possible objections. As a student of philosophy I expect a clear premise and a well structured argument to back it up. I agree with most of what he says, but I honestly don't see how you could attack his argument if you didn't. There's no "If A, then B and if B then C. Now I'm going to prove A and B." Instead he gives us detailed analysis of several medieval paintings and anecdotes from his research.

    I did appreciate his bristling at Hitchens and Dawkins' confrontational atheism. I like(d) them, but both frequently get a pass because of their divine status in the atheist pantheon.

    In the end "extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence," and he hasn't brought that.

    3 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • The Ethical Butcher: How to Eat Meat in a Responsible and Sustainable Way

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 35 mins)
    • By Berlin Reed
    • Narrated By Berlin Reed
    Overall
    (4)
    Performance
    (4)
    Story
    (4)

    America is in the midst of a meat zeitgeist. Butchers have emerged as the rock stars of the culinary world, and cozy gastropubs serving up pork belly, lamb burgers, and sweetbreads rule the restaurant scene. If butchers are our new rock stars, then Berlin Reed is their front man. Through the lens of Berlin's personal story, The Ethical Butcher educates listeners about how they can improve the meat industry by participating in it.

    Sean says: "Wanted to love it"
    "Wanted to love it"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I agree strongly with the author's premise that engaging a practice in an ethical way represents the best way to effect change. It is much better than ridicule and disdain which have no chance of creating a dialogue.

    Unfortunately, I just can't take someone seriously when the make sweeping statements like "all of modern Western society is a farce" or "the rich just don't want the poor to succeed and that's a fact."

    As an advocate of local sourcing and sustainable practices I really wanted to enjoy this book. The author has many important things to say from first person experience. But the writing is just too over the top for me to allow myself to be influenced. I feel it undermines the author's trust and disrespects the reader's acumen when an author makes sweeping generalizations and wants you to accept it with "that's just a fact."

    Also, the author has chosen to read his own book, which is almost always a mistake. His voice is nasal and weak and his reading is flat.

    I believe he would be a fantastic dinner companion, but this book is a step in the wrong direction.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Paleofantasy

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 49 mins)
    • By Marlene Zuk
    • Narrated By Laura Darrell
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (73)
    Performance
    (65)
    Story
    (62)

    We evolved to eat berries rather than bagels, to live in mud huts rather than condos, to sprint barefoot rather than play football - or did we? Are our bodies and brains truly at odds with modern life? Although it may seem as though we have barely had time to shed our hunter-gatherer legacy, biologist Marlene Zuk reveals that the story is not so simple. Popular theories about how our ancestors lived - and why we should emulate them - are often based on speculation, not scientific evidence. Armed with a razor-sharp wit and brilliant, eye-opening research, Zuk takes us to the cutting edge of biology to show that evolution can work much faster than was previously realized.

    Kali says: "Dropping some evolution knowledge!"
    "Interesting and well researched"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    In addressing the various themes of "our stone age bodies/minds aren't designed for modern life" the author covers a lot of ground, but she still leaves some areas unexplored. The performance matches the sometimes serious, sometimes funny text well.

    The author uses evolutionary science to debunk several claims regarding modern diets, fitness regimens, child rearing and relationships. Unfortunately, she only chooses to address concepts that she seems confident she can refute. While she convincingly argues for the plasticity of our genome, there certainly are ancient limitations that we are stuck with (our poor grasp of probability, our low genetic diversity, the fallacy of multi-tasking).

    Her discussions are evidence based but she mostly avoids directly citing papers and studies. However, this leaves many discussions meandering in a grey area between opinion/interpretation and hard facts.

    She tempers her criticism of the "paleo" movement with wit and empathy for those people trying live a better life. I believe adherents of the paleo-lifestyle who are interested in the other side of the argument could enjoy the book.

    3 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • Hollywood Stories: Short, Entertaining Anecdotes about the Stars and Legends of the Movies

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 17 mins)
    • By Stephen Schochet
    • Narrated By Chaz Allen
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (32)
    Performance
    (27)
    Story
    (28)

    Hollywood Stories: Short, Entertaining Anecdotes About the Stars and Legends of the Movies by Stephen Schochet, contains a timeless treasure trove of colorful vignettes featuring an amazing all-star cast. This includes: John Wayne, Charlie Chaplin, Walt Disney, Jack Nicholson, Johnny Depp, Shirley Temple, Marilyn Monroe, Marlon Brando, Errol Flynn and many others both past and contemporary.

    A. Payable says: "Hanna Barbra? Goodfellows?"
    "A 5 hour issue of People magazine"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    If you keep your expectations low this book can entertain you with short 1-2 min anecdotes from old Hollywood stars. Most of the material is from the 20-50s and even as a fan of that period I did not recognize several names.

    The production is incredibly annoying--the reader has sycophantic tone and every story is punctuated by a burst of "ditty" music ("da-deet-deet-da-da"). You will hear that ditty about 200 times by the end of the book.

    The stories are the sort you would hear from the PR department of a movie studio--not TMZ. There's no real dirty laundry, just funny stories and the occasional "Oh you scamp!" moment, but the author is clearly infatuated with his subjects--probably a little too much.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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