You no longer follow Randy

You will no longer see updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can re-follow a user if you change your mind.

OK

You now follow Randy

You will receive updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can unfollow a user if you change your mind.

OK

Randy

Lynwood, IL, USA

74
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 2 reviews
  • 4 ratings
  • 1 titles in library
  • 0 purchased in 2014
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
0

  • The Amulet of Samarkand: The Bartimaeus Trilogy, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By Jonathan Stroud
    • Narrated By Simon Jones
    Overall
    (1998)
    Performance
    (827)
    Story
    (830)

    Nathaniel is eleven-years-old and a magician's apprentice, learning the traditional art of magic. All is well until he has a life-changing encounter with Simon Lovelace, a magician of unrivaled ruthlessness and ambition. When Lovelace brutally humiliates Nathaniel in public, Nathaniel decides to speed up his education, teaching himself spells far beyond his years. With revenge on his mind, he masters one of the toughest spells of all and summons Bartimaeus, a five-thousand-year-old djinni, to assist him.

    Randy says: "Terrific Trilogy"
    "Excellent story, brilliant narration"
    Overall

    After listening to dozens of audiobooks, Simon Jones has quickly become my favorite reader. With an easy-to-understand British accent, excellent vocal range and pacing, perfect enunciation and terrific character voices, he does yet another outstanding job with this book.

    The book itself is something kids and adults will enjoy. The main characters, Nathaniel (a young magician's apprentice), and Bartimaeus (a demon conjured by Nathaniel and forced unwillingly to do his his bidding) are well-developed and brought engagingly to life by the reader. Bartimaeus's wry comments about Nathaniel and life in general will have the listener chuckling quite often.

    Nathaniel is somewhat of an anti-hero at first; he's deceitful, proud, arrogant, and above all impatient to prove and test his abilities, which of course causes all kinds of tragedy, mayhem and suspense.

    The author's style of writing several chapters first from the demon's viewpoint and then the boy's keeps things quite interesting and engaging. We get to see what's motivating both of them from different vantage points, and it works well to keep the story flowing smoothly and provides a cliff-hanger or two when we switch from one to the other.

    Simon Jones also reads book 2, which is every bit as good as this one. Both are well-worth repeated listenings. Here's hoping he reads book 3 as well.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Ender's Shadow

    • ABRIDGED (6 hrs and 14 mins)
    • By Orson Scott Card
    • Narrated By Michael Gross
    Overall
    (364)
    Performance
    (68)
    Story
    (67)

    In Ender's Game, child-hero Ender Wiggin battles a deadly alien race and wins. Now Card tells the story of Bean, the one who became Ender's right hand, his strategist and his friend, the only one who was with him in the final battle.

    Randy says: "Excellent book, poor production"
    "Excellent book, poor production"
    Overall

    I won't rehash what's been said about the book itself already; if you liked Ender's Game, you MUST read Ender's Shadow. And I do mean read, not listen. This was the first audiobook I ever stopped listening to halfway through because it was so aggravating.

    First off, the narrator seems to be whispering most of the time, and turning up the volume might cause your speakers to blow or eardrums to bleed when he does speak loudly. Also featured in the production is a fellow with such a deep voice he puts James Earl Jones to shame. I believe he narrated Ender's Game as well, and I didn't like him then either.

    Secondly, having read the actual book before, I can say without any doubt that this abridged version is a real hatchet job. Authors normally abridge their own works, so I can't imagine why Card would cut out so many key scenes of his story. Without giving anything away, gone is Bean living with Sister Carlotta, gone is Bean's first meeting with Petra, gone is the whole initial exploration of the air vent along with the explanation as to why Bean is doing unusual excercises...

    It was at this point that I gave up out of sheer frustration. Read the book!

    69 of 71 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

CANCEL

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.