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ES

ratings
8
REVIEWS
4
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
0
HELPFUL VOTES
4

  • Joseph Anton: A Memoir

    • UNABRIDGED (26 hrs and 59 mins)
    • By Salman Rushdie
    • Narrated By Sam Dastor, Salman Rushdie
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (220)
    Performance
    (194)
    Story
    (189)

    On February 14, 1989, Valentine's Day, Salman Rushdie was telephoned by a BBC journalist and told that he had been "sentenced to death" by the Ayatollah Khomeini. For the first time he heard the word fatwa. His crime? To have written a novel called The Satanic Verses, which was accused of being "against Islam, the Prophet and the Quran". So begins the extraordinary story of how a writer was forced underground, moving from house to house, with the constant presence of a police protection team.

    Lynn says: "Informative, Timely"
    "Indignation, Love, Imagination and Art"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Salman Rushdie, writing his memoir in the third person, illustrates the relationships and values and mistakes and triumphs that characterized his response to the outrage of being a writer targeted by the Iranian fatwa. He writes about his loves and imperfections, his angers and the pain he felt at the frequent criticism (often distorted) in the British press as the Fatwa and the risk to his life extended on year after year. Vivid friendships with many notable writers, artists and musicians run throughout the text, and were the web that helped him and his family survive the emotional burden of maintaining security in face of repeated renewals of the threats against him coming from the Iranian government each year. This is a memoir in which the multiple losses-- through divorce, death, estrangement, and personal vulnerability-- play next to the threat of violent death as the result of terror. Perhaps it is most moving when the 65 year old Salman writes to his 52 year old self that it is time to grow up. In this moment, he remembers some of the most painful (and unfortunate) choices he made and faces them with grace and responsibility. Throughout, his love of imaginative worlds and their possibilities shines through, as does his absolute commitment to the sacred values of free speech and human rights.

    Sam Dastor is a wonderful reader and creates an amazing variety of voices and accents. Great performance!

    This is a long and lovely listen.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Gone Girl: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 11 mins)
    • By Gillian Flynn
    • Narrated By Julia Whelan, Kirby Heyborne
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (20030)
    Performance
    (17933)
    Story
    (17995)

    It is Nick and Amy Dunne's fifth wedding anniversary. Presents are being wrapped and reservations are being made when Nick's clever and beautiful wife disappears from their rented McMansion on the Mississippi River. Husband-of-the-Year Nick isn't doing himself any favors with cringe-worthy daydreams. Under mounting pressure from the police and the media - as well as Amy's fiercely doting parents - the town golden boy parades an endless series of lies, deceits, and inappropriate behavior. Nick is oddly evasive, and he's definitely bitter - but is he really a killer?

    Teddy says: "Demented, twisted, sick and I loved it!"
    "Excellent Performance, but empty Novel"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Well read, entertaining, but ultimately there are no appealing characters and didn't really feel worth all the time I spent listening to it. Little meaning in the end.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Home: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (4 hrs and 29 mins)
    • By Toni Morrison
    • Narrated By Toni Morrison
    Overall
    (130)
    Performance
    (112)
    Story
    (111)

    Frank Money is an angry, self-loathing veteran of the Korean War who, after traumatic experiences on the front lines, finds himself back in racist America with more than just physical scars. His home may seem alien to him, but he is shocked out of his crippling apathy by the need to rescue his medically abused younger sister and take her back to the small Georgia town they come from and that he's hated all his life. This is a deeply moving novel about an apparently defeated man finding his manhood - and his home.

    Melinda says: "not a novel, but a collection of short stories"
    "Beautifully written and beautifully read"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is on par with Toni Morrison's other fiction-- moving, redemptive, and poetic. This audiobook is an outstanding performance, and listening to Ms. Morrison perform gives weight and movement to the words. The understated and contained expressiveness of her voice reflects the tension and containment that the characters must bring to themselves as they cope with overwhelming traumas of war, medical abuse, and racism. Listen and listen again.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Life and Operas of Verdi

    • ORIGINAL (24 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By The Great Courses
    • Narrated By Professor Robert Greenberg
    Overall
    (24)
    Performance
    (21)
    Story
    (21)

    The Italians have a word for the sense of dazzling beauty produced by effortless mastery: sprezzatura. And perhaps no cultural form associated with Italy is as steeped in the love of sprezzatura as opera, a genre the Italians invented. No composer has embodied the ideal of sprezzatura as magnificently as Giuseppe Verdi, the gruff, self-described "farmer" from the Po Valley who gave us 28 operas and remains to this day the most popular composer in the genre's 400-year-old history.

    Alifa says: "The Life and Operas of Verdi"
    "Professor Pompous"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What disappointed you about The Life and Operas of Verdi?

    I found the lecturer incredibly annoying and pompous. The biographical information is interesting, but the delivery is much longer than necessary and full of annoying attempts at humor that fall flat. I've found the opera synopses vapid and distracting, and the orientation to the musical highlights insufficient for my interests. Read a Verdi biography instead.


    Would you ever listen to anything by The Great Courses again?

    NO


    What didn’t you like about Professor Robert Greenberg’s performance?

    See above--


    3 of 6 people found this review helpful

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