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Gustavo

Joao Pessoa, Brazil

4
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 10 reviews
  • 11 ratings
  • 224 titles in library
  • 0 purchased in 2014
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  • Dr. Oliver Sacks on Music and the Mind

    • UNABRIDGED (1 hr and 28 mins)
    • By Oliver Sacks
    • Narrated By Robert Krulwich
    Overall
    (55)
    Performance
    (34)
    Story
    (35)

    Dubbed "the poet laureate of medicine" by The New York Times, Dr. Oliver Sacks is one of the great medical writers and storytellers of our time. He has transformed our understanding of the human mind and restored narrative to a central place in the practice of medicine. His best-selling books, including Awakenings, The Man Who Mistook his Wife for a Hat, and An Anthropologist on Mars, entertain, enlighten, and inspire his many fans around the world.

    Amazon Customer says: "A good read"
    "How a terrible reader can spoil an audiobook."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you like best about Dr. Oliver Sacks on Music and the Mind? What did you like least?

    I was listening to his Musicophilia, 25 times longer and better, because in this little book I cannot pay attention to his voice, so monotonal and lifeless it is. Actually, his reading made it unbearable to listen to anything he said, be it good or bad.


    What was most disappointing about Oliver Sacks’s story?

    I could not say becuase of his voice is so bad that one cannot pay attention to what is being read.


    Who would you have cast as narrator instead of Robert Krulwich?

    I thought the voice was from the author. I guess it is difficult to find anyone worse than him. I've read several commentaries complaining about the quality of the narrator. In all of them I gave them a fair try, by listening to them in their free sample, and ended up by saying that it wasn`t that bad. This is the first one I cannot tolerate hearing to it. I should have gone to the free trial first. It was my bad. I guess that in this particular case I was enjoying so much the narrator (John Lee) of Musicophilia that, when I found out this other one reading the text, I could not bear such dramatic change for the worse.


    Did Dr. Oliver Sacks on Music and the Mind inspire you to do anything?


    To listen first the free sample before buying any audiobook from now. It is an important lesson. It could save both money and a lot of unnecessary anger.


    Any additional comments?

    ALWAYS LISTEN THE FREE SAMPLE FIRST TO JUDGE BY YOURSELF WHETHER OR NOT YOU CAN STAND THE READING, BEFORE BUYING IT.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 6 mins)
    • By Oliver Sacks
    • Narrated By John Lee
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (477)
    Performance
    (185)
    Story
    (180)

    Music can move us to the heights or depths of emotion. It can persuade us to buy something, or remind us of our first date. It can lift us out of depression when nothing else can. It can get us dancing to its beat. But the power of music goes much, much further. Indeed, music occupies more areas of our brain than language does - humans are a musical species.

    Shimon says: "A must for music lovers"
    "The brain and music: how they are connected it."
    Overall
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    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    Yes, especially if that person likes either psycology, music or the inner works of our brain. It is very well narrated, very informative.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    It is not a fictional work. But you can relate to some of the cases discussed in here.


    Which character – as performed by John Lee – was your favorite?

    I didn't finish all the book yet, but John Lee has done a great job. I downloaded another book narrated by the author himself. I could not stand it, whereas in this book even the most technical details seem to be a normal complement to the whole book. With a lesser narrator, I don't even know if I could stand it either.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    It is not that kind of book, although someone else might be more sensitive than me as to this.


    Any additional comments?

    I cannot say what exactly makes this book so good. Could be its narrator, the way it is written, the odd aspects related to music, or the whole ensemble. Whatever it is, is a very good reading to learn things about our mind.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • I, Claudius

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 48 mins)
    • By Robert Graves
    • Narrated By Nelson Runger
    Overall
    (1446)
    Performance
    (728)
    Story
    (733)

    Here is one of the best historical novels ever written. Lame, stammering Claudius, once a major embarrassment to the imperial family and now emperor of Rome, writes an eyewitness account of the reign of the first four Caesars: the noble Augustus and his cunning wife, Livia; the reptilian Tiberius; the monstrous Caligula; and finally old Claudius himself. Filled with poisonings, betrayal, and shocking excesses, I Claudius is history that rivals the most exciting contemporary fiction.

    Chris says: "Unsurpassed, addictive brilliance"
    "One of the best one hundred books ever written"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you love best about I, Claudius?

    All the characters possess life. They want money and power; they behave like most people elsewhere. This book brings forth the human nature with all its contradictions and imperfections. Reading the Confession by Rousseau, he said that the live of Twelve Caesars had such a power over him that he lost his liking for novels. I could say the same thing about I, Claudius. The real people of Rome are so captivating that it is difficult to find imaginary characters who can be compared to them. We learn at the same time as we are informed about Roman History, in a way never told before, behind the official books, with all its secrets awaiting to be read by anyone sensitive enough to feel all there is of unique in it.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    Claudius himself. All his intelligence, all the things he had to underwent, all types of humiliations, betrays by his four wives, especially the last two. I will read more books on Roman history only to know better that time, since Julio until Nero. After that I will read again this book, to compare what normal history has to say about such period and what Robert Graves wrote in his masterpiece. I also liked to understand the role played by Livia, August's wife; Herodotus and how cunning he was. Germanicus. Tiberius. Even Caligula has its place in his craziness


    What does Nelson Runger bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    At first I thought he read too fast, but gradually I got used to his speed. His has a good voice and he puts a lot of emotion in his reading.


    If you could take any character from I, Claudius out to dinner, who would it be and why?

    Herodotus. I found him to be the most intelilengent of them; perhaps Livia is as smart as him, but I would never dinner with her. She has a bad habit of placing poison in everything one eats. August would be another good choice, for he has a great deal to say about his time ruling. I also would never invite Caligula, Nero or Tiberious. They are good for nothing.


    Any additional comments?

    This book is one of the best, if not the best work of History I ever read in all my live, with the only exceptional of one terrific book written by German writer Spengler about culture in all civilizations, but they are very different types of books. I would strongly recommend Spengler because his is one of the most philosophical and artistic historians I ever found. There is only one man more pretentious than him: the author of beyond good and evil.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Word of Promise Complete Audio Bible: NKJV

    • UNABRIDGED (98 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Thomas Nelson, Inc.
    • Narrated By Jason Alexander, Joan Allen, Richard Dreyfuss, and others
    Overall
    (2177)
    Performance
    (1464)
    Story
    (1467)

    This faithful rendering of the New King James Version presents the Bible in more than 90 hours of compelling, dramatic audio theater format.This world-class audio production immerses listeners in the dramatic reality of the Scriptures as never before with an original music score by composer Stefano Mainetti (Abba Pater), feature film quality sound effects, and compelling narration by Michael York and the work of over 500 actors.

    Nancy says: "Majestic listening"
    "The best Bible ever criated."
    Overall
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    What did you love best about The Word of Promise Complete Audio Bible: NKJV?

    It is not just one isolate thing. It is the whole package. The high quality of pronunciation, the dramatization, the great number of actors who worked professionally to bring this Bible alive, the clever way with which the translations was made, which is not so old as King James', but it is not so simple as the common standard ones; the size of it, the speed, the rhythm with which they utter it; the clarity of it. If the Devil is in the details, God is in the details as well. Those details are far superior than a normal Bible, read by a monotonal, lifeless voice, which takes away all the pleasure in the listening. The ensemble is far greater than the additional of its parts.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    Other than Jesus, all the other men's of God who have lived before him in the Old Testament. Saint Paul is one of my favorites also.


    Which character – as performed by the narrators – was your favorite?

    I still haven't heard all the Bible yet, for I prefer listening several times the same passage over and over, but they are all very good.


    If you were to make a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

    It would be impossible to make only one film about so much material. I would rather make a ten years series telling the whole story of the Bible. The name of it would be the whole Bible.


    Any additional comments?

    Any crhistians should have the opportunity to listen to this Bible, for all its high qualities. I will listen to it my whole life: only God knows how many times.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • How to Win Friends & Influence People

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 19 mins)
    • By Dale Carnegie
    • Narrated By Andrew MacMillan
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (10315)
    Performance
    (4922)
    Story
    (4913)

    You can go after the job you want...and get it! You can take the job you have...and improve it! You can take any situation you're in...and make it work for you!

    Ralph says: "This is well worth listening too! Main points are."
    "The best book on human relation so far and by far"
    Overall
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    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    Of course, I would. In spite of the misleading title, this book is not about the use of people. On the contrary, like Jesus said, the leader is the one who serves rather than the one who is served. The leader has a genuine interest in people. 18 years ago I went with my father, who had just received an important medal in Brazil from the Judicial system along with the President of the Supreme Court. My father could not speak two minutes with the President, while I who was by then just a student of law talked to him for more than one hour and was invited to spend two weeks in his private house. I just gave to the President of Justice of the Supreme Court what he craved: a sense of importance. I listened much more than I talked. I made several questions about things he liked to talk about, like volleyball, swimming pools, jokes. He treated me like I was the most important person there. I was the only one giving him a pleasant time. I did not ask a thing. But he filled me with offers. In my work place, I have never had a single problem with anyone for sixteen years, only because I speak with everybody, from the President of Brazil to the killers and thieves in the slums. I was kidnapped last year, and they kidnappers liked me so much that they wanted to return my car to rob another one. I decline such offer, because I knew that someone else might be killed for lack of interpersonal skills to deal with kidnappers. In the beginning, they wanted to kidnap my mother, to take me to rob a bank in another State. I smiled my way through all of that, using what I've learned in this book, the Tao and the Bible. This book can do wonders for you in every level of your life: with your mother-in-law, with your wife, with your children, boss, employees, etc. It is a simple yet profound guide to live among other human beings. Those lessons will be important two thousand years from now, like Jesus teachings are as valid today as they were long ago. You may not know the name of so and so, but that doesn't matter. Take way the lessons on how to deal with people, whatever your profession may be: it is going to be worthwhile. I guarantee.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    The author.


    Which character – as performed by Andrew MacMillan – was your favorite?

    Andrew Macmililan has a wonderful voice. He was the right man for the job. I only wish he had read more books than only the two written by this author.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    Too many to remember. It is not a book to be only read. It is a book for action. It changes the way you deal with people. Every person should read at least once such book.


    Any additional comments?

    What you can do with what you learn from this book is so precious that it's price is insignificante. You may save your marriage. Have a much better relationship with your children. Be both respected and loved both by people that work over you and under you. This book helped me escape from six roberies and one kidnapping completely safe. There is no limit to what you can apply those lessons. You will be a wiser person, a person that most people will enjoy be around. This book opens a whole new other ways to use the lessons taught, in ways unthinkable to its author himself. You should give it to anyone you care about. It is not one of those cheap self-help books. It was written before this time. It simple to understand, didatic, taught step by step. Most of the things you will read or listen won't change your life as this book will.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Crime and Punishment (Recorded Books Edition)

    • UNABRIDGED (25 hrs and 5 mins)
    • By Fyodor Dostoevsky
    • Narrated By George Guidall
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1442)
    Performance
    (639)
    Story
    (637)

    Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment is universally regarded as one of literature's finest achievements, as the great Russian novelist explores the inner workings of a troubled intellectual. Raskolnikov, a nihilistic young man in the midst of a spiritual crisis, makes the fateful decision to murder a cruel pawnbroker, justifying his actions by relying on science and reason, and creating his own morality system. Dehumanized yet sympathetic, exhausted yet hopeful, Raskolnikov represents the best and worst elements of modern intellectualism. The aftermath of his crime and Petrovich's murder investigation result in an utterly compelling, truly unforgettable cat-and-mouse game. This stunning dramatization of Dostoevsky's magnum opus brings the slums of St. Petersburg and the demons of Raskolnikov's tortured mind vividly to life.

    Greg says: "Wonderful Book"
    "One of the best one hundred books ever written"
    Overall
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    If you could sum up Crime and Punishment in three words, what would they be?

    Crime and Punishment


    What other book might you compare Crime and Punishment to and why?

    In one of the chapters of Brother's Karamazov, there is a long account that has most of the elements latter used in Crime and Punishment. I believe that his author was very concerned about redemption after committing a crime, through facing open punishment, both towards other human beings and to the law. There is another book, called Five Steps to Redemption, in which you, in order to be redeemed, need to place yourself in the same position you were when you broke the law, but this time you have to choose to act differently than before. Only then you would be granted true redemption. In Crime and punishment, you must confess in the streets, to everybody, crying aloud: I'm a murderer. I'm a murderer. After which, you should accept be put in prison to pay for the wrongs you have made. Only then, would you find true peace of mind and begin to live again. I believe Crime and Punishment should be read along with Five Steps Towards Redemption, for an enhanced comprehension of this issue, along with some chapters of Brothers Karamazov, to see how ingrained this idea is in its author.


    What does George Guidall bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    Saint Augustine used to say that faith entered by the ears. Some things that went unnoticed while I was reading gained more importance while I am listening to it. But I believe such great books deserve to be both read and listen to, because the two ways complement each other in a very powerful fashion. You should also watch a well done BBC production on it, read papers on magazine dedicated in literature, read the biography of Dostoyevsky. All it takes to fully grasp the essence of what you read, rather than just reading several other cheap and shallow books. One should do this to all great books of humankind. If you happen to leanr at a high level another language, you should read/or listen it in that other language as well.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    I prefer Bother's Karamazov. It is much deeper.But Crime and Punishment is better finished as a work of art. Both should be read.


    Any additional comments?

    Remember to read Five Step Towards Redemption to enhance the analyze of Crime and Punishment. They both match very well, and deepen the issues involved.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The 5 Levels of Leadership: Proven Steps to Maximize Your Potential

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 13 mins)
    • By John C. Maxwell
    • Narrated By John C. Maxwell
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (537)
    Performance
    (460)
    Story
    (443)

    True leadership isn't a matter of having a certain job or title. In fact, being chosen for a position is only the first of the five levels every effective leader achieves. To become more than "the boss" people follow only because they are required to, you have to master the ability to invest in people and inspire them. To grow further in your role, you must achieve results and build a team that produces. You need to help people to develop their skills to become leaders in their own right. And if you have the skill and dedication, you can reach the pinnacle of leadership....

    Stephanie says: "Relevant and Applicable"
    "Improve your learship skills in five levels"
    Overall
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    Would you consider the audio edition of The 5 Levels of Leadership to be better than the print version?

    I haven't seen the printed version yet, but to me seeing and listening are two complementary things. I am from Brazil, so I need to listen as much as I can. When I read, it is more to learn grammar, spelling, those stuff. When I listen, I get a lot more. Other than I can listen in situations in which would be impossible for me to read. Both are important, because the book gives more time to ponder over issues.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    Non fictional, no characters.


    Have you listened to any of John C. Maxwell’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    I haven't. I liked his voice and the speed with which he read: not too fast, not too slow. I would buy another books narrated by him.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    It is not that kind of book.


    Any additional comments?

    It is an excellent book to buy. I liked his concept of five levels of leadership and that you can have people to whom you are in the first or second level, at the same time while with other people you may be higher or lower. This book has a good basis on human knowledge. It is not a book teaching how to use people. It is rather a book about being humane, passionate, open, frank, loyal, sincere. In three words: a great leader. It deserves to be read carefully and applied in real life. Happy will be the man who can say yes to eight of his ten questions of leadership. If he he can say yes to all of them, he is already blessed. It has something of the spirit of Tao and a lot of the good old school of How to make friends and influence people, modernized to today's world.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • A Conversation with Joseph Finder and Malcolm Gladwell

    • ORIGINAL (1 hr and 9 mins)
    • By Joseph Finder, Malcolm Gladwell
    Overall
    (695)
    Performance
    (334)
    Story
    (335)

    Joseph Finder and Malcolm Gladwell are both best-selling authors who write about issues from the business world – one in fiction and the other in nonfiction. Listen to this insightful conversation between these authors as they discuss topics that range from the best qualities of CEOs and sales people, to the nature of genius, to how they do their research and the mechanics of writing, to the intricacies of interpreting facial micro-expressions.

    Ray says: "Fasinating Discussion"
    "Should be a lot longer"
    Overall
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    What did you love best about A Conversation with Joseph Finder and Malcolm Gladwell?

    The free interchange of topics discussed and the way that naturaly one issue lead to another, no mather how unrelated they were.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    Both writers are the main characters.


    Have you listened to any of the narrator’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    I haven't. I don't have anything to say, either of good or bad about him. I guess it was an okay job.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    I found very interesting the way the author of Blink buys books. He goes three times to a bookstore for every purchase and may lose interest in any book only due to an minor aesthetical failure in the presentation of it. He took very seriously Oscar Wilde sayings that only superficial man don't pay attention to the outer appearance of things. His mind seemed not to have a central issue to study things. Any book to him is just about the same. I don't agree with those views, but I liked listening to his ideas, anyway, whatever they were.


    Any additional comments?

    I've listened to it two times already. There are a few clues for writers to be, writers of lesser books, nonetheless.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Second Coming of Steve Jobs

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 58 mins)
    • By Alan Deutschman
    • Narrated By Charles Stransky
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1223)
    Performance
    (143)
    Story
    (144)

    From the acclaimed Vanity Fair and GQ journalist - an unprecedented, in-depth portrait of the man whose return to Apple precipitated one of the biggest turnarounds in business history.

    Thomas says: "Awesome background on Apple, NeXT, and Pixar."
    "The emotional account of Steve Job way of being"
    Overall
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    If you could sum up The Second Coming of Steve Jobs in three words, what would they be?

    A great book


    What was one of the most memorable moments of The Second Coming of Steve Jobs?

    Since his early years studding without having the meanings to pay for it, up to a time when he was rich, the book is filled with remarkable moments, too many to count. Though he did not eat any kind of meat, he had too much anger bottled up inside of him, eating him away: was also given to display such anger towards just about anyone. I believe that all such anger eventually developed itself into his final cancer. He had his far share of beautiful women, but was too selfish-centered to accommodate himself to any of them in a proper way. His ego was huge. He had a very charismatic personality, which he used to his own full advantage. Doesn't matter whether or not you like this take on his life, because it is so compelling that you will enjoy both the storytelling and the narrator, which is one of the very best there is, making all scenes come alive, as if we were watching a great movie about his personal life, with regards to the way he works as well. It may well be the best book published on Steve Jobs: it is not too long, it is deeply personal and shows him in several human situations. Altogether, a book that made more than a few dents on his biography, in a very personal way.I don't quite agree with those reviewers who said that this author was technological incompetent to tell Steve Jobs story in Apple. He worked for more than a decade, covering those vey issues as a journalist and he has a keen eye to what really matters about life. It is a great biography overall. Even if he is not a genius in relation to all little detail about technology, his gift is far greater: for a touching, engaging, human story, superbly told. Whatever the background the reader has, he will be enriched by so many different aspects dealt with in this short masterpiece.


    Have you listened to any of Charles Stransky’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    I haven't. But I'm thinking about researching his work, because his performace is one of the best I ever found. He adds a lot in the overall sensation of listening to this book, because he is capable of conveying every single human intonation at the precise time. He is one of the very best. I hope that Audible give him several more good books for him to work in them that exact same way.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    I had a constant flow of detailed and surprising stories about Steve Jobs presented to me. I may have laughed some times. As for crying, I cannot recall that.


    Any additional comments?

    Don't think too much. Just buy this book, if you want to know, in a concise yet fully developed manner, the life of one of the best creative minds of our time, or if you simply want to find more entertaining and informative book to listen to while commuting or power walking. But don't listen to it before sleep time: you may lose your sleep entirely. This book is that good.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Bible Jesus Read

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 36 mins)
    • By Philip Yancey
    • Narrated By Maurice England
    Overall
    (18)
    Performance
    (15)
    Story
    (13)

    If you think it's just a mysterious, outdated book, think again. It's the Bible Jesus read, used, and loved. The Old Testament is God's biography, the story of his passionate encounters with people. It is also a prequel to the story of Jesus, who came to answer the questions that troubled the ancient writers and still trouble us today. For expressing our deepest longings and voicing the full range of our lives and emotions, the Old Testament has no equal. Join Philip Yancey as he explores these sometimes shocking, often cryptic divine writings....

    Gustavo says: "How to understand God in Old Testament"
    "How to understand God in Old Testament"
    Overall
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    What made the experience of listening to The Bible Jesus Read the most enjoyable?

    The best is the content, the ideas in it. The writer has a lot to say about God in the Old Testament, especially how He relates with His chosen ones: His chosen people. He focus also in how to bear pain and suffering. I liked very much when the writer mentioned the experience of the death of his father-in-law, of how he dealt with all complications of old age and death, always quoting the Old Testament in which he (and we) can relate to, in order to better understand God's Will. This book stays with you, touches you deeply. Jesus read the Old Testament. Read it often. Knew it by heart. From reading this book, I realize that we should read it more often, too, for itself and both towards a better understanding of the New Testament and of Jesus` role in it. This book is a must read and thought provoking. If you like or care about religious issues, you won`t regret having listened to it. Even if you are a non beliver interested in knowing some good book to make you think about the human condition, you should pick this one up, because in spiritual studding there is a lot of knowledge about the humans as well. One cannot understand the divine without understand the human, and the other way around.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of The Bible Jesus Read?

    There are several such memorable moments throughout the whole book, because it is a book that goes direct to seminal points, some of them sprang from decades of reading the Bible and other important books as well, without which one cannot fully understand the Bible. The writer is well read and has given some personal thought to several issues, which makes this book both more informative and more interesting to listen to than the same old ideas of most authors who only repeat what everybody already knows, like the sermons in most churches. There are only a few of writers like that, the ones who writes because they actually have something to say rather than just an itching to appear on print and the dubious fame of being one more writer, among so many, who only repeat, sometimes even without changing the form of the words, what other have said elsewhere, long ago, in a much better way. To write well one has to spend several years getting familiar with the subject matter of what one is going to write, or at least read the great books and practice the art of writing, until writing becomes effortlessly and natural. After that, comes the long process of familiarization with what is going to be written. This book went through the whole natural process of birth. That's why it is rather small. There is no unnecessary things in it just to make it think, like some others. The writer knows his craft and he has something personal to tell the readers. Francis Bacon said that the extreme majority of all books don`t deserve to be read, because they weren`t written seriously enough. This one is one rare exception to this general rule. You may even read (or listen) to it more than once.


    Have you listened to any of Maurice England’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    If I had, I cannot say. Probably not. Overal is a good performace that makes more pleasant to listen to it than several other readers of other books. He is not the best, but is among the best, though. No more, no less.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    It is almost impossible to me to find such a book. I buy several books at once and I like to 'rest' from one book by listening to another book, a secret a learned when I was in Law school, to make me read more: about sixteen hours a day. Of course, to read like that I had to miss almost all the lessons. Half of the time, I was reading all kinds of books. There is an interview, free of charge, of two writers talking about several issues (one of them wrote Blink) that I was able to listen to it in one sitting, only because it lasts a little longer than one hour. There is a book, the Second Coming of Steve Jobs, that made me want to listen for the longest time: it is very engaging. Both the writer and reader.This one I listened for more than two hours straight. I think the merit for that belongs to the content and to the way the book is written, one subject bringing forth another one naturally. Another thing that makes me not be able to listen for too long was something I`ve learned from Seneca: whenever you are reading and find something worthwhile, stop to think about that for as long as you can. When I find things that are very important, I stop reading to ponder about what I read/heard. That may take longer, but also makes for a much more active reading/listening. In the end, what really matters is not exactly what you've read, but how you reacted to what you've read. The reaction time needs to be increased for as long as possible. A Portuguese Poet called Fernando Pessoa said that knowledge is what remains when we forget everything we've read: what remains is our reactions to whatever we've read.

    Once one very learned scholar came to Einstein and said that he used to read almost 16 hours a day, every day of the week. Then he asked what Einstein thought about him reading that much. Einstein's answer was that this man was a lazy person, a very lazy person. Bewildered, the scientist asked to Einstein why he was lazy if he studied for so long and so hard. The answer was that his laziness was due to the fact that If he reads 16 hours a day, when will he have time to think about what he has read? That scholar that read that many hours for years and years on end was only been lazy, because he was not doing the difficult and hard stuff that is required, in order to achieve real knowledge, that is, to imagine and figure out things by himself, instead of only trying to accumulate a great number of informations about some matter.

    You can never demand from yourself to remember everything you've read, for as Schopenhauer said: Retaining all you've read in your head is as impossible as bringing inside of your belly all that you have already eaten.It is much more important to break someone's head, trying to figure out some theoretical problems in our minds than just skip the pages of any book in a frantic way to get more information out of it. The computers can do that kind of stuff better and faster than us, but up to now they still can't think of anything as yet. In order to learn something, one has to spend more time in innermost contact with whatever we are thinking, but more time does not always translate itself in more chronological hours. Time means energy. To have more time is to have more energy, to go beyond the layers of the perception of our limited reality.

    Takes much more energy to think something anew than just to skip pages of a book. I myself use to spend some twenty years or more thinking over something that is bothering me to fully understand it. I have some answers that I know that are not deep enough, so I keep on digging a hole in them, trying to see the problem from all possible angles. Sometimes I think that I gave up of that issue, but to my own surprise suddenly something I read or I see helps me to make a new connection, helping me to delve into such a problem from a new perspective: that's my nature of studying anything I like. And I just read and study what I like or love. Knowlege is made out of love.Of course being the way I'm carries a burden with it, because, by focusing all our time and energy to pursue too much of anything, we will create a laser like beam of light only in that particular small area we are concentrating all of our attention in detriment of the rest of our life: one may forget to spend quality time with his loved ones or to take care of his own health.


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